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Arthur Jones, Nautilus memorabilia

Astudent

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@alfresco What was Arthur's thoughts about Ken Hutchins? Hutchins seems to be a real intelligent, creative guy but I only recall Arthur making one statement about him and that was that he was a pathological liar. Hutchins definitely gained a big following with his SuperSlow protocols and even developed his own line of machines. Heard his health hasn't been too good lately.
 

Samson250

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So Travolta has a huge gym at his airport home filled with all original Nautilus equipment! How did the wife end up with all that property in the divorce?
 

alfresco

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@alfresco What was Arthur's thoughts about Ken Hutchins? Hutchins seems to be a real intelligent, creative guy but I only recall Arthur making one statement about him and that was that he was a pathological liar. Hutchins definitely gained a big following with his SuperSlow protocols and even developed his own line of machines. Heard his health hasn't been too good lately.
Arthur had zero respect for Ken. Nut Everybody has the right to design or
modify anything they like. They also have the right to write anything they
choose be it right or wrong. Ken was / is a Arthur wannabe.

Arthur called Super Slow Training "Super Stupid."

I know nothing about his health. I hope he is well.
 

lookslikesausage

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One of my favorite machines is Nautilus the old school chain driven pull over for back, I loved that thing you could swing way back and come in way low for a huge squeeze.. even the old school bicep preacher machine was awesome along w the tricep preacher push down… would love to come across some of those
I had all three at one point but traded the Pullover (it was the newer version). Still have the Bicep and Tricep pieces. Really love the Bicep.
 

Bigboomer5150

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I had all three at one point but traded the Pullover (it was the newer version). Still have the Bicep and Tricep pieces. Really love the Bicep.
Lucky guy, there was a gym in Michigan old school place half the building was split racketball other half gym pool steam room dry sauna the whole 9 but you know it’s old when there’s full racket ball courts still, anyways they had every old school piece of the nautilus equipment that gigantic leg press slash leg curl machine it was huge anyways they eventually replaced it all but that’s stuffs worth a fortune today I bet it or not ??
 

alfresco

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Lucky guy, there was a gym in Michigan old school place half the building was split racketball other half gym pool steam room dry sauna the whole 9 but you know it’s old when there’s full racket ball courts still, anyways they had every old school piece of the nautilus equipment that gigantic leg press slash leg curl machine it was huge anyways they eventually replaced it all but that’s stuffs worth a fortune today I bet it or not ??

If you are asking about prices, they vary due to the condition, rarity, and
shipping charges (This is a big one.).

Some people replace the bearings, change from chain to a belt, new upholstery,
paint job. Some have even change the shape of cam to it being less aggressive.
 

Sides

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Briefly, Arthur entered into a business agreement to go to the Caprive Strip
in Africa and to be the first person to ever capture a fully grown crocodile.
He caught many and packaged them up and transported them by train across
Africa and loaded them on ship back to the USA. An adventure of a lifetime.

Fully grown crocodiles were very rare. Small ones are 'easy' to capture but the
problem is that they grow very slowly, so a fully grown one was much sought
after and brought many people into the road side attractions that were very
popular after the war.

1. Wooden packing crates for transporting the crocodiles.
2. Measuring a captured crocodile. This one was 12' 9" long. Value ~ $2,000
Arthur attention to detail and accuracy was legendary. That is why he called
BS on so many bodybuilders with their inflated measurements and bodyweight.
3. Crates of captured crocodiles, ready for shipment to USA from Mozambique.
4. Dragging a crocodile back to a holding pen which Arthur had to build out of
existing materials which were very scarce.
5. Their tented camp. The Caprive Strip was very barren and devoid of many trees
but did have an almost unlimited supply of crocodile food; lechwe, an antelope.
6. Arthur in one of his home made crocodile holding pens.
7. Pulling a crocodile of the water.

What I find fascinating about all this is that today most people just know Arthur Jones as "the Nautilus guy" or for his brief, intense training protocols which led to later protocols like HIIT or Mentzer's "Heavy Duty" or Dorian Yates "Blood and Guts" training.

And yet Arthur Jones had whole careers, and had made and lost fortunes, in entirely separate fields, on several different continents, decades before he made the first Nautilus machine ("the Blue Monster.") Many people in other times only knew him because of his work importing, selling, and filming wild animals. There is the story about Arthur Jones calling to rent a car, and the rental clerk knowing exactly who he was before he even said his name, because the clerk recognized the voice of the narrator of the wild animal adventure show "Wild Cargo."

It is staggering to think how much courage, hard work, and logistical acumen it would have taken to capture hundreds of adult wild live crocodiles (189 by Arthur's count), then keep them alive in captivity, transport them over the ocean to the United States, and sell them to their eventual buyers.

Jones' account of his adventures in the Caprivi Strip can be found here:


Jones was certainly no one-trick pony; that's for sure. He was a brilliant man who was immensely talented and proficient in many fields of endeavor. And yet, sadly at the end of his life he seems to have ended up bitter and disappointed, as shown by this quote from his autobiography:

"Having avoided medical school because I did not want to work an average of twenty hours a day, seven days a week, like my father did, I nevertheless worked at a very similar pace throughout most of my life; now, many years later, I still don’t sleep very much, but I no longer have the energy required to work at the pace I did for about forty years. I have been dead broke several times, have made fortunes and then lost them, made very large fortunes in several businesses, importing animals, reptiles and tropical fish, film production, the operation of international airlines for the transportation of airfreight, the exercise-machine business (Nautilus) and most recently in the medical market. So I have certainly been busy for a very long time; yet, now, in retrospect, when I look back over the years of my life, most of it appears to have been wasted effort. Many things that once appeared to me to be all important now hold no slightest interest for me. I still own the largest privately-owned airport in the world, but no longer have any airplanes; until a very few years ago I had the largest privately-owned collection of exotic wild animals in the world, but now have no animals of any kind, not even a cat, and I like cats."
 

lookslikesausage

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Lucky guy, there was a gym in Michigan old school place half the building was split racketball other half gym pool steam room dry sauna the whole 9 but you know it’s old when there’s full racket ball courts still, anyways they had every old school piece of the nautilus equipment that gigantic leg press slash leg curl machine it was huge anyways they eventually replaced it all but that’s stuffs worth a fortune today I bet it or not ??
some pieces are worth a little bit. depends on the condition. it's a very niche item. most people wouldn't even know what they're looking at. They want shiny and new. They assume shiny and new equals good. Of the few who do know what they're are looking at, then there's an even slimmer group who'd be willing to fork over a few grand for vintage Nautilus. one of the big problems with vintage pieces like this is transportation. You might have one guy in the whole country who'd be willing to pay an outrageous price for a piece because it's his favorite piece ever (it's a grail for him). He's on the other side of the country. So even though he's willing to pay almost any price for said piece, now he has to find a way to ship across the country. That, every often, can cost more than the actual piece of equipment.
 

lookslikesausage

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What I find fascinating about all this is that today most people just know Arthur Jones as "the Nautilus guy" or for his brief, intense training protocols which led to later protocols like HIIT or Mentzer's "Heavy Duty" or Dorian Yates "Blood and Guts" training.

And yet Arthur Jones had whole careers, and had made and lost fortunes, in entirely separate fields, on several different continents, decades before he made the first Nautilus machine ("the Blue Monster.") Many people in other times only knew him because of his work importing, selling, and filming wild animals. There is the story about Arthur Jones calling to rent a car, and the rental clerk knowing exactly who he was before he even said his name, because the clerk recognized the voice of the narrator of the wild animal adventure show "Wild Cargo."

It is staggering to think how much courage, hard work, and logistical acumen it would have taken to capture hundreds of adult wild live crocodiles (189 by Arthur's count), then keep them alive in captivity, transport them over the ocean to the United States, and sell them to their eventual buyers.

Jones' account of his adventures in the Caprivi Strip can be found here:


Jones was certainly no one-trick pony; that's for sure. He was a brilliant man who was immensely talented and proficient in many fields of endeavor. And yet, sadly at the end of his life he seems to have ended up bitter and disappointed, as shown by this quote from his autobiography:

"Having avoided medical school because I did not want to work an average of twenty hours a day, seven days a week, like my father did, I nevertheless worked at a very similar pace throughout most of my life; now, many years later, I still don’t sleep very much, but I no longer have the energy required to work at the pace I did for about forty years. I have been dead broke several times, have made fortunes and then lost them, made very large fortunes in several businesses, importing animals, reptiles and tropical fish, film production, the operation of international airlines for the transportation of airfreight, the exercise-machine business (Nautilus) and most recently in the medical market. So I have certainly been busy for a very long time; yet, now, in retrospect, when I look back over the years of my life, most of it appears to have been wasted effort. Many things that once appeared to me to be all important now hold no slightest interest for me. I still own the largest privately-owned airport in the world, but no longer have any airplanes; until a very few years ago I had the largest privately-owned collection of exotic wild animals in the world, but now have no animals of any kind, not even a cat, and I like cats."
This is really sad to read however, I'd only add that even if he never accomplished what he did in his lifetime, he'd likely be just as sad, or maybe even more sad and regretful that he never actualized his potential. I doubt he looked back on his life felt that he didn't accomplish a lot.
 

hawkmoon

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So much good material here...I need to set time aside. I usually browse PM during small breaks in my workday, but this material deserves more time.
Thank you @alfresco , as always.
 

alfresco

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Here is what Arthur did to attain his best condition. As many you know,
he was a volume guy but his forced layoffs, eventually convinced him to
cut his training back because of the sticking points he would encounter'
once he started training again. So he cut it back, then back some more,
eventually he landed here.

The only correction to my training is that I added behind the neck presses
after the upright rows, which was preceded by lateral raises. What remains
is explained. It is a great pre-exhaust tri-set if you can handle it . . .
with no rest in between, everything is set-up in advance, at your feet, you
don't even have to move.
 

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tokon

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i would love to read through a few of these articles but cannot download in a format that enables me increase font size!
 

alfresco

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1. Arthur and a rhino.
2. Filming rhino's with a special camera mount on vehicle.
3. Arthur's equipment in his studio.
4. Filming rhino's with a special camera mount.
5. Special camera mount on Arthur's helicopter
6. Arthur recording in his studio, Rhino Hill, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).
 

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thethinker48

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What I find fascinating about all this is that today most people just know Arthur Jones as "the Nautilus guy" or for his brief, intense training protocols which led to later protocols like HIIT or Mentzer's "Heavy Duty" or Dorian Yates "Blood and Guts" training.

And yet Arthur Jones had whole careers, and had made and lost fortunes, in entirely separate fields, on several different continents, decades before he made the first Nautilus machine ("the Blue Monster.") Many people in other times only knew him because of his work importing, selling, and filming wild animals. There is the story about Arthur Jones calling to rent a car, and the rental clerk knowing exactly who he was before he even said his name, because the clerk recognized the voice of the narrator of the wild animal adventure show "Wild Cargo."

It is staggering to think how much courage, hard work, and logistical acumen it would have taken to capture hundreds of adult wild live crocodiles (189 by Arthur's count), then keep them alive in captivity, transport them over the ocean to the United States, and sell them to their eventual buyers.

Jones' account of his adventures in the Caprivi Strip can be found here:


Jones was certainly no one-trick pony; that's for sure. He was a brilliant man who was immensely talented and proficient in many fields of endeavor. And yet, sadly at the end of his life he seems to have ended up bitter and disappointed, as shown by this quote from his autobiography:

"Having avoided medical school because I did not want to work an average of twenty hours a day, seven days a week, like my father did, I nevertheless worked at a very similar pace throughout most of my life; now, many years later, I still don’t sleep very much, but I no longer have the energy required to work at the pace I did for about forty years. I have been dead broke several times, have made fortunes and then lost them, made very large fortunes in several businesses, importing animals, reptiles and tropical fish, film production, the operation of international airlines for the transportation of airfreight, the exercise-machine business (Nautilus) and most recently in the medical market. So I have certainly been busy for a very long time; yet, now, in retrospect, when I look back over the years of my life, most of it appears to have been wasted effort. Many things that once appeared to me to be all important now hold no slightest interest for me. I still own the largest privately-owned airport in the world, but no longer have any airplanes; until a very few years ago I had the largest privately-owned collection of exotic wild animals in the world, but now have no animals of any kind, not even a cat, and I like cats."

This is more rhetorical than anything but; Do you think contentment was ever going to be part of Arthur's personality?

It seems like he had an extreme personality; saw the world in his own way and operated using that lens. Often times people like these have big impacts; shape entire industries, and happiness often becomes besides the point for them. You would know more on this though than anyone else since he was your friend

I know Arthur has talked about loneliness and companionship as elements that weren't easily filled for him; despite having anything and everything in the world
 

maldorf

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1. Arthur and a rhino.
2. Filming rhino's with a special camera mount on vehicle.
3. Arthur's equipment in his studio.
4. Filming rhino's with a special camera mount.
5. Special camera mount on Arthur's helicopter
6. Arthur recording in his studio, Rhino Hill, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).
Wow, I guess it's safe to walk up to I giant rhino in the wild? That animal could have turned him to mush in a few seconds. I see he had his riffle. Braver than me!
 

alfresco

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This is more rhetorical than anything but; Do you think contentment was ever going to be part of Arthur's personality?

It seems like he had an extreme personality; saw the world in his own way and operated using that lens. Often times people like these have big impacts; shape entire industries, and happiness often becomes besides the point for them. You would know more on this though than anyone else since he was your friend

I know Arthur has talked about loneliness and companionship as elements that weren't easily filled for him; despite having anything and everything in the world
Good question.

It would be great to read Sides 'side' of this as he has lots of information
on Arthur and is very bright, articulate and insightful. I hope he chimes in.

I know your question is directed at Sides as you quoted him but I will give
you my two cents worth.

My answer is that Arthur was not easily satisfied (content?), was
always looking for ways to improve whatever he was doing in his life at
the time. So, that being true, I doubt he was easily satisfied or would ever be
completely satisfied. He was a very driven person. Driven by what exactly,
your guess is as good as mine. But problem solving and perfection was at
the top of the list. He was not driven by by money. He considered it a tool
to accomplish his goals whatever they were at the time.

I think the closest he ever came to true contentment (which is impossible
to say now that he has passed), something he was most proud of was his
low back medical machine which has been largely overlooked in the medical
community despite his best efforts to the contrary. He really did want
people to be well, the best they could be and was always doing research
towards that end.

Reading his autobiography (should be required reading for anybody following
this thread) will give you much insight into him and his personality. I think
one his biggest regrets is that he could not be in two places at once because
of all the mistakes that were made in his absence.

I really can't comment on his loneliness and companionship. He seemed to be
always surrounded by people (hanger's-on), almost all wanting something
from him. That must have been exhausting for him. Loneliness I have no cue.

Hope this helps.
 

thethinker48

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Good question.

It would be great to read Sides 'side' of this as he has lots of information
on Arthur and is very bright, articulate and insightful. I hope he chimes in.

I know your question is directed at Sides as you quoted him but I will give
you my two cents worth.

My answer is that Arthur was not easily satisfied (content?), was
always looking for ways to improve whatever he was doing in his life at
the time. So, that being true, I doubt he was easily satisfied or would ever be
completely satisfied. He was a very driven person. Driven by what exactly,
your guess is as good as mine. But problem solving and perfection was at
the top of the list. He was not driven by by money. He considered it a tool
to accomplish his goals whatever they were at the time.

I think the closest he ever came to true contentment (which is impossible
to say now that he has passed), something he was most proud of was his
low back medical machine which has been largely overlooked in the medical
community despite his best efforts to the contrary. He really did want
people to be well, the best they could be and was always doing research
towards that end.

Reading his autobiography (should be required reading for anybody following
this thread) will give you much insight into him and his personality. I think
one his biggest regrets is that he could not be in two places at once because
of all the mistakes that were made in his absence.

I really can't comment on his loneliness and companionship. He seemed to be
always surrounded by people (hanger's-on), almost all wanting something
from him. That must have been exhausting for him. Loneliness I have no cue.

Hope this helps.

I quoted Sides's post thinking it was yours lol ; both of you guys have deep insight into bodybuilding history, and I was too tired to properly read the poster name

So your 2 cents are definitely appreciated, thank you
 

Sides

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Messages
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This is more rhetorical than anything but; Do you think contentment was ever going to be part of Arthur's personality?

It seems like he had an extreme personality; saw the world in his own way and operated using that lens. Often times people like these have big impacts; shape entire industries, and happiness often becomes besides the point for them. You would know more on this though than anyone else since he was your friend

I know Arthur has talked about loneliness and companionship as elements that weren't easily filled for him; despite having anything and everything in the world
Of course, Ron knew Arthur best, and the rest of us can just speculate based on what we have read of the man. But I think it’s a great question, with a sad answer.

Did Arthur Jones have the capacity for contentment or lasting happiness within him? I would say that the answer is no.

He certainly had more than his share of successes and failures, won and lost fortunes, beautiful women and bitter divorces, friends and enemies, adventures and discoveries, fame and acclaim, and then he faded back to the shadows of anonymity, as a sullen and tired old man moping and puttering around the house in Florida, telling friends that he was “waiting to die.”

Even as a child and young man, Arthur was constantly running away from home, hitchhiking and riding the rails across the country, trying his hand at many different businesses, but never staying in one place for long or focusing at length on what was in front of him.

Arthur Jones was clearly brilliant, but as others have pointed out, today he might be diagnosed somewhere on the autism spectrum, perhaps with Asperger’s Syndrome or a similar condition. Arthur was a highly functioning individual to a tremendous degree in many fields, yet self-admittedly seemed to lack the capability to successfully communicate his ideas to others, often resorting to insults and invective, or even threats of violence, instead of persuasion.

Arthur called this his “slap in the face with a cold fish philosophy”, as reported by Dan Riley, who was the head strength coach for the Houston Texans and Washington Redskins. Dan was also the strength coach at West Point when Arthur did his famous Project Total Conditioning study, and became a great friend and fan of Arthur’s ideas, despite his initial reluctance:

https://www.houstontexans.com/news/texans-fitness-corner-2674183

"I was supposed to be the Academy's "strength training expert." I didn't know anything about machines or high intensity exercise. Rather than admit this, I found it easier to discredit the equipment and the methods. I was forced to visit Arthur Jones for a week at his Nautilus plant in Deland, Florida. After meeting with Jones I found him to be arrogant and abrasive. It became easier to dislike him, his equipment, and his high intensity training.

He insulted anyone and everyone to include medical doctors, trainers, therapists, professors, scientists, football coaches, strength coaches, bodybuilders, and weightlifters. His relationship with most professionals was strained at best…

I visited Arthur Jones many times in Deland, and Ocala, Florida. He taught me more about exercise than anyone. We became friends.

During one of my visits I asked him why he treated people the way he does? I asked him why he insulted everybody? He told me it was what he called his, "Slap in the face with a cold fish philosophy."

He explained to me how he attended clinics and medical symposiums and tried to talk with doctors, coaches, professors, and athletes, about his equipment and new techniques. He claimed they weren't willing to listen. So he began insulting people. He said it was like meeting someone for the first time and "whacking them in the face with a cold fish." It got their attention and people began to listen to what he had to say. He said they might not believe him, but at least they were now willing to listen. Some people listened and learned, but many more refused to accept or believe anything he had to say."


Whether because of his inability to communicate with people, or because of his bitterness at how things had turned out, Arthur seemed to regret many of his life choices by the time he wrote his autobiography. He begins “And God Laughs” with the following paragraph:

http://www.arthurjonesexercise.com/GodLaughs/1.PDF

“Most of the people who come to our attention are from a relatively small part of the total population, individuals who have devoted their efforts towards attempts to gain fame or fortune, or both. But if they are successful, they may then find that very little turned out the way they expected. Having been unfortunate enough to become relatively famous twice in my life, and having become very rich at least once, I have learned some of the real costs of fame and fortune. If I had to do it over, and had any choice in the matter, I would pass . . . “Thanks but no thanks.””

In the last chapter of his book, Arthur goes to great length to describe his self-perceived difficulties at communicating, and his lack of hope in the future:

http://www.arthurjonesexercise.com/GodLaughs/80.PDF

“In an early chapter I remarked that this book is largely devoted to a long list of bad people and a few good people, and that is true; but it does not follow that I believe that most people are bad. Quite the contrary, I still believe that most people are good in every sense of the word; but I also believe that the majority of people, the good people, are seldom heard of. Perhaps they are smarter than I am, have enough sense to avoid attention.

Which, if true, produces a bit of a paradox: because, if you believe that you have something of value to say, just how can you make other people aware of those opinions while keeping them to yourself? I have seldom had sense enough to keep my mouth shut in many situations where opening it led only to trouble that probably could have been rather easily avoided by remaining silent; and this book may well prove to be nothing more nor less than another mistake similar to a long list of earlier ones. But none of these mistakes were ever results of attempts on my part to prove how smart I am, were usually proof of my continued stupidity; nor were they attempts to prove how dumb somebody else was, since I have at least learned just how counterproductive that always is. They were, instead, attempts to communicate; attempts to raise questions that appear to have been overlooked, to provide possible solutions that have not been previously considered.

The main thing that I have proven to my own satisfaction is the fact that I apparently do not know how to communicate with many people, am usually far more likely to insult them than I am to attract their interested attention; which has never been my intention. But there have been, at least, a few exceptions to that general rule; and these exceptions have been the only things that have provided me with much in the way of satisfaction throughout my life.

And these are the supposed ‘leaders’ in this field. But, then, millions of people followed leaders like Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin, so I guess we should not be surprised. Frankly, at this point in my life, I don’t believe I could be surprised by anything; pissed off, disgusted, irritated, yes; but surprised, no. But if any of these people ever do decide to surprise me, then about the only way they could do so would be by coming to their senses; perhaps that would surprise me.

Eventually this will change, but I do not believe it will change significantly within my remaining lifetime; and while I sometimes still feel that getting widespread recognition for the results of my work would be very satisfying, I also remember that any such previous attention has usually provided more in the way of problems than it did in the way of benefits.

So I guess we will just have to see what we see; or, as the Jews say . . . “Man plans, and God laughs.””


Arthur Jones was not a religious man, although the title of his autobiography comes from the Jewish saying “Man plans; but God laughs.” However, when I think of the last days of Arthur Jones, I think of the King in Ecclesiastes 2:9-17.

9 So I was great, and increased more than all that were before me in Jerusalem: also my wisdom remained with me.

10 And whatsoever mine eyes desired I kept not from them, I withheld not my heart from any joy; for my heart rejoiced in all my labour: and this was my portion of all my labour.

11 Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do: and, behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun.

12 And I turned myself to behold wisdom, and madness, and folly: for what can the man do that cometh after the king? even that which hath been already done.

13 Then I saw that wisdom excelleth folly, as far as light excelleth darkness.

14 The wise man's eyes are in his head; but the fool walketh in darkness: and I myself perceived also that one event happeneth to them all.

15 Then said I in my heart, As it happeneth to the fool, so it happeneth even to me; and why was I then more wise? Then I said in my heart, that this also is vanity.

16 For there is no remembrance of the wise more than of the fool for ever; seeing that which now is in the days to come shall all be forgotten. And how dieth the wise man? as the fool.

17 Therefore I hated life; because the work that is wrought under the sun is grievous unto me: for all is vanity and vexation of spirit.
 

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