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Best Investments For Those With Zero Experience?

Kaladryn

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I have a little info, I have trained a lot of stock market guys, usually retired, and became friends with many of them. Individual stocks are a gamble, you want to invest in the market as a whole, this means mutual funds, ETFs, etc. Your money will grow with the market, which is generally a pretty good return over the long term.
 

Bodyofwork365

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I have a little info, I have trained a lot of stock market guys, usually retired, and became friends with many of them. Individual stocks are a gamble, you want to invest in the market as a whole, this means mutual funds, ETFs, etc. Your money will grow with the market, which is generally a pretty good return over the long term.

Completely agree with this. Look into a good mutual fund and remember slow and steady wins the race. As you get more experienced you can decide on individual stocks or even crypto currencies but I always treat those the same as I would going to Vegas and gambling. I’ve done extremely well in crypto and some individual stocks but I wouldn’t trust my retirement to either. If you’ve got an employer that has a matching 401k jump all over that because if not you’re literally giving away free money.
 

xpac2

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Index Funds. You invest in the whole market which goes up over time. Lower managemnt fees than mutual funds
 

Kimba

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Depends on your age and financial plans.

I do low risk mutual and index through my employer. I am young, but, I want a safety net through market shifts.

I also invest in my own picked stocks / alt coins / OTC stocks, etc.

A segment of my money goes into my and my wives student loans and paying off things early. This is because I expect the bubble to eventually pop and with my risk vs reward I would rather have less debt and capital for a correction. I could be way off.
 

Slyder190

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Really appreciate everything single reply. Thank you. Now I know a starting point. Any books you trust anc recommend, even just to get me familiar? Thank you again.
 

Kimba

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Really appreciate everything single reply. Thank you. Now I know a starting point. Any books you trust anc recommend, even just to get me familiar? Thank you again.

The intelligent investor by Graham is a long term stock book and there is a book with Buffets essays using a lot of the same principles.

I liked The Psychology of Money by housel. I do some penny stocks and it helped get the emotions of market trends in check. For most it is very hard to not emotionally react.

Start with Graham for the basics of value investing. That is the long term stuff. A lot of the principles stay the same. Buy value in the asset. So coins, companies, etc that will succeed is what you buy into.

Surprisingly Reddit has some good advice on r/investing and how to do due diligence (research a company).

Another tidbit I consider is what hedgefunds are doing. Berkshire Hathaway is collecting cash (over 100 Billion) and did a stock buy back I believe. I see that as a sign there are not a lot of large scale value buys available and want to hord some cash for when I find a good value buy.

Take my advice with a grain of salt. I am not a great investor.
 

machomadness22

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How much cash do you have? Do yo I have a retirement at all? Even some part time jobs have some sort of pension or 401k type plan and that’s completely transferable as well. I know you said you didn’t have a portfolio I wasn’t sure if you didn’t have a retirement or not. I would look into setting up an IRA, as long as you have some cash on hand in a savings account 3-4 month’s monthly wage is a good start point before investing.Usually need some upfront money I’m not sure what your budget is if it’s small I would start there as little as $50 a month is an ok start . If you have little more you couple start to dabble in some blue chip stocks that pay good dividends. Delta, coke, Mcdonalds strong long standing companies. Again I have no idea how much money you have or are willing to put up. Someone said real estate I agree but I personally would secure my savings and have some retirement in place before I got into that.
 

old timer

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Well basically at the rate I'm going I'll have to wotk up until at least lunchtime on the day I die.
Someone summarized it as follows:

Focus
Stoicism
Time
Diversification

Stoicism is where I think most people have a problem. While there are a few exceptions, the most assured way to get rich is to live on MUCH less than you make and invest the rest (and an S&P 500 index fund is a great way to be diversified)!

I have a few things that I'll spend some money on, but in many other ways I'm extremely cheap. When my son started driving, I gave him the Honda Civic that we bought used and I paid $9,500 cash for a 2016 Nissan Sentra.

I'm 54 and our house is paid for, we have no debt, and my wife and I each save 15% of our salaries with another 3% saved by our employers.
 

maldorf

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Someone summarized it as follows:

Focus
Stoicism
Time
Diversification

Stoicism is where I think most people have a problem. While there are a few exceptions, the most assured way to get rich is to live on MUCH less than you make and invest the rest (and an S&P 500 index fund is a great way to be diversified)!

I have a few things that I'll spend some money on, but in many other ways I'm extremely cheap. When my son started driving, I gave him the Honda Civic that we bought used and I paid $9,500 cash for a 2016 Nissan Sentra.

I'm 54 and our house is paid for, we have no debt, and my wife and I each save 15% of our salaries with another 3% saved by our employers.
I agree. That's great you bought a car you could buy outright with cash. I don't have that kind of discipline. We buy cars and pay them off in 2 years or less. We also never carry a balance on our credit cards. The credit cards pay us to use them. I like that! We average about $45 a month back in cash. Free money.
 

foxman101

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@Slyder190 I think you want to ask the right questions but your not doing it.
Where your at in your life and where you want to be needs to be addressed first.

Like me, I was 25, played poker for a living in FL, I won enough to buy a house so I did that. Got a 3/2 rented out the other 2 rooms to friends, grew equity, got married bought more real estate .. using my $ now to work for me.
Now that I have equity … now I’ll focus long term.. as the right questions for now and focus on that, then we can address the future and retirement
 

Sassy

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Best financial plan:
  1. Pay down debt. I try to remain as debt free as possible. I pay my auto loans off and drive it until the wheels fall off then we buy new ones. My credit cards are paid off each month. I don't put it on card if I don't have the money.
  2. Emergency Savings: Start a savings or money market account and put money a side for emergencies. Example: Money to cover health, auto or home insurance deductibles; One good goal is to have 1/2 year's salary in savings.
  3. Retirement: Start putting money in an IRA or 401K as soon as you can. The younger the better. Take advantage of an company matches. That's FREE money. Your goal should be meeting your companies match.
  4. HSA or 529 College Savings: Take advantage of tax deductions such as HSA/FSA health savings accounts and college savings accounts. You can take the tax deductions while saving money. Any interest or dividends are not taxed if you use it for their purpose. One more tip: I'm not dipping into my HSA as long as I can, so we can use it for when we retire. You will be able to use that money for health care expenses and it will not be taxed, instead of paying taxes on the money you take out of Traditional IRS.
  5. Other Investments: I suggest learning as much as you can about the different investments options, because you can really grow your money by investing in things other than a bank savings, money market, CD. You have decide how much you can stomach if the market turns.
  6. Don't get overwhelmed. Personal finance takes time to learn and understand. Don't try to learn it all over night or week, etc.
If you want to learn more about investing, I'm going to suggest (disclaimer) my cousin and his partner's Podcast The Money Guy Show . He is also on YouTube. He's really young, but he explains things really well and doesn't talk over your head. I'm not saying you need to use him as an advisor. You should find one that you like and are comfortable one. But my cousin's Podcast, they give some really sound advise. Be fore warned... he's a nerd!!! 🤓 I love him. 🤣:ROFLMAO:
 

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Performance Based

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As in no portfolio at this point.
S&P Index Fund - Unsure of posts like these, its' not so much an opinion but a fact until you have access to private wealth management etc. Real estate is ONLY fantastic when utilizing the 1031 deferral advantage and swapping in and out of properties with the right given market sentiment. Paying your cars/properties off is a different generation of wealth management advice and really is not the best advice. You pay 2.3% interest (a write off also) vs. dropping that money in the S&P making 11%... It makes legitimately zero sense not to leverage tangible properties/goods.

Good place to begin: https://www.bankrate.com/investing/best-index-funds/


Since the inception of the S&P in 1957 the average return has been just a hair shy of 11%.

What you really need to do - Establish how much you need to live off of at retirement. Plan for that being a 4% annual withdrawal from your fund. Figure out how much you need in that fund. Begin. IE if I need $200,000 at retirement (not including inflationary changes) I need a portfolio valued at 5M.

Here is a good compounding interest calc to help get you started. https://www.investor.gov/financial-tools-calculators/calculators/compound-interest-calculator


Over 30 years - $20,000 initial deposit. Monthly contribution of $1,900. 11% aggregate interest rate you will have 4.995M
 

Joltan

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S&P Index Fund - Unsure of posts like these, its' not so much an opinion but a fact until you have access to private wealth management etc. Real estate is ONLY fantastic when utilizing the 1031 deferral advantage and swapping in and out of properties with the right given market sentiment. Paying your cars/properties off is a different generation of wealth management advice and really is not the best advice. You pay 2.3% interest (a write off also) vs. dropping that money in the S&P making 11%... It makes legitimately zero sense not to leverage tangible properties/goods.

Good place to begin: https://www.bankrate.com/investing/best-index-funds/


Since the inception of the S&P in 1957 the average return has been just a hair shy of 11%.

What you really need to do - Establish how much you need to live off of at retirement. Plan for that being a 4% annual withdrawal from your fund. Figure out how much you need in that fund. Begin. IE if I need $200,000 at retirement (not including inflationary changes) I need a portfolio valued at 5M.

Here is a good compounding interest calc to help get you started. https://www.investor.gov/financial-tools-calculators/calculators/compound-interest-calculator


Over 30 years - $20,000 initial deposit. Monthly contribution of $1,900. 11% aggregate interest rate you will have 4.995M

I was going to post the same thing... just purchase stock in the s&p500. It's basically a mutual fund, which lowers risk substantially. The ticker symbol is SPY.

Steps:
1. Download TD Ameritrade ThinkorSwim platform (or you can use Webull, or Robinhood if you prefer)
2. Deposit money into TD Ameritrade
3. Go long and 'Buy' stock in SPY.
4. Hold long term (years), and compound the interest by adding in any earnings to your initial investment.
5. Watch your money grow and snowball.

You have to be willing to put your money in there and hold it for the long term. The market is still volatile in the short term, so there will be ups and downs - but over time it nearly always averages 10% or so. If you buy at a bad time, you may see lose 10% in the first year - but will likely see 20% in one of the following years to make up for it. Just depends how strong the economy/market is during that year.
 

strummer

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If your young a nice mix of vanguard low cost mutual funds, compounding interest and time are your friend..slow,steady and boring......= results
 

TheAnabolicFreak

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You can’t go wrong with either Bitcoin or Ethereum right now. Nothing is guaranteed but I’d be willing to bet my life that both will go up drastically in the next few years.
 

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