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Healthy Sleep Habits Could Lower Risk of Heart Failure by 42 percent, Study Finds

danieltx

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I'm always amazed at guys who are content to power through their day with stimulants, who refuse to wear a CPAP because they don't want a hot girl to see them wearing it, etc. If you're serious about your health and your bodybuilding progress, improving your sleep is one of the easiest things you can do.

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/hea...failure-42-percent-study-finds-214043007.html

Not only does getting a good night’s sleep keep you alert and functional — it may cut your risk of heart failure by 42 percent.

That’s the conclusion of a Nov. 16 observational study published in Circulation, a journal by the American Heart Association, which followed 408,802 U.K. study subjects between the ages of 37 and 73 between the years 2006 and 2010.

Heart failure, a condition that affects 26 million people worldwide, occurs when the heart doesn't efficiently pump blood to the body’s cells, which causes weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath and other symptoms. It’s usually triggered by conditions like coronary artery disease or high blood pressure which can damage the heart, says the Mayo Clinic, and is easy to overlook at first, due to the body’s defense mechanisms: According to the American Heart Association, at first, the heart tries to “compensate” for its weakness by pumping harder and faster but over time, it succumbs to damage.

To understand what is “healthy sleep,” researchers considered five factors: The duration of sleep, circadian rhythms (are subjects “morning” or “night” people?), insomnia (difficulty falling or staying asleep), snoring and daytime sleepiness. They determined that the healthiest sleepers get between seven and eight hours of sleep per night, rise early, rarely or never experience insomnia, do not snore and aren’t excessively tired throughout the day.

Subjects self-reported all this information, including their histories of heart failure, which was also confirmed by nurses and hospital procedural codes.

Overall, healthiest sleep habits were associated with a 42 percent lower risk of heart failure, even after adjusting for risk factors like diabetes and medication use. “That’s the most important finding,” study author Dr. Lu Qi, the director of the Tulane University Obesity Research Center, tells Yahoo Life. “Our study is the first to combine these five habits in a new sleep score and the first to analyze that score with heart failure risk — previous studies analyzed individual, not combined behaviors.”

As explained in a press release, the risk of heart failure was eight percent lower in people who rose early, 12 percent lower in those who slept between seven and eight hours per night, 17 percent lower among those without insomnia and 34 percent lower among those who didn’t experience daytime drowsiness.

The research is observational and uses self-reported data, which is a less reliable way to collect data. “We also can’t say, for example, what caused a subject to snore nor can we say that snoring itself causes heart failure,” says Qi, “only that there’s evidence of a relationship.”

“The healthy sleep pattern may benefit cardiovascular health including lower risk of heart failure through several potential ways,” he explains. “For example, previous studies have shown that healthy sleep behaviors may improve lipids (lowering LDL, and improving HDL) and chronic inflammation.”


However, people can make lifestyle adjustments to improve their quality of sleep, says Qi, such as quitting nicotine products (the stimulating drug, found in cigarettes, has been linked to insomnia and sleep apnea) and exercising; According to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, it could be due to the mood-stabilizing effects of exercise, “a cognitive process that is important for naturally transitioning to sleep.”

“The most prevalent theory for why people sleep is for the brain to essentially remove ‘waste products’ produced throughout the day,” Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler, the co-director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at the Mayo Clinic, tells Yahoo Life. “Those toxins are metabolic byproducts that gather in the spaces between brain cells — but during sleep, they are removed and cells are restored.”

Lacking quality sleep is associated with a range of health problems including diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease, he says. “For example, there’s strong evidence that poor sleep is associated with increased inflammation, which can lead to the hardening of arteries.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults ages 18 to 60 should get at least seven hours of sleep per night with an additional one to two hours for anyone older (and a range of age-appropriate recommendations for children). The agency also advises picking a consistent bedtime (experts say this can train the body clock to wake up and drift off easier), falling asleep in a dark, comfortable room and avoiding big meals, caffeine and alcohol before bed.
 

Pheedno

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Surprised that it's only 42% honestly. I am so jealous of the people who can just sleep 8 hours uninterrupted on command.

No joke. I'm really lucky to get 3hrs before waking up and around 6 total
 

maldorf

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Some of the medications I take now ruin my sleep some nights I think, but there isnt much I can do about it. I have to take those meds. I used to sleep very well before my heart attack. Nowadays I still have some PTSD around sleeping, and sometimes I feel like subconsciously I am putting off getting to bed because Im worried my defibrllator might go off while Im sleeping. Also have some fear that I may not wake back up. This really affects how I feel during the day for sure. A few times a week I get good sleep.
 

USMuscle9403

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I've been a chronic insomniac all my life. Honestly, I think it stems from having night terrors as a kid and never sleeping, and even though I don't even have nightmares at all anymore, it still kinda sticks. I don't have apnea, thankfully, my brain simply doesn't shut the fuck up. I have varying success with otc things like diphenhydramine, melatonin, but that's as far as I want to go. Valerian root is off and on, as is ZMA. Truthfully, it seems the best I can hope for getting a hold of a med strain good for sleep (currently have blue dream which IS great for sleep) or luckily just fall asleep naturally. I'm not really even sure what else to do and I really, really don't want to go the prescription route...
 

xpoc

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Well I am screwed. I fall asleep HARD around 930-10 every night. Sleep like a rock until about 1am. Then I am up every hour, on the hour to piss, roll over cuz my shoulder falls asleep, or my mouth drys out and i need a sip of water.

It is the most bizarre thing. I can be SOUND asleep in a deep dream and all of a sudden wake. Without opening my eyes I make a game of trying to guess the time. I am ALWAYS within 15 mins of what it really is. It is not uncommon for me to hit the nail on the head with random numbers. Like, in my head I will say, "I think its 318am." I will then open my eyes, roll over to look at the clock and its friggen 318am. WTF?
 

USMuscle9403

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Well I am screwed. I fall asleep HARD around 930-10 every night. Sleep like a rock until about 1am. Then I am up every hour, on the hour to piss, roll over cuz my shoulder falls asleep, or my mouth drys out and i need a sip of water.

It is the most bizarre thing. I can be SOUND asleep in a deep dream and all of a sudden wake. Without opening my eyes I make a game of trying to guess the time. I am ALWAYS within 15 mins of what it really is. It is not uncommon for me to hit the nail on the head with random numbers. Like, in my head I will say, "I think its 318am." I will then open my eyes, roll over to look at the clock and its friggen 318am. WTF?

This is me, pretty much, even to guessing the time. For me, it was always 3:33...weird number...
 

chopsuey

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Interesting, thanks for the link.

There was a really good Dave Asprey podcast, I can't remember the guest, will look it up. Anyways he was/is the top sleep specialist and basically talked about the same thing.

The big kicker for me was all these C-level executives/high level business owners going to see him and all thought they only need 4-5 hours of sleep and not affecting them...completely wrong and all markers improved when they did everything to get more sleep and better quality sleep.

Something I struggle with myself as it's hard to shut off the mind when so much is going on.
 

old timer

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I've been a chronic insomniac all my life.
Some might say "big deal. That's just more time to do things." But my mom struggled with this for a few years, and she said there were many "nights" when the SUN would come up before she finally fell asleep. She's still living (83 years old) and one of the toughest women I've ever known, but she said there were nights she'd cry because she was so miserable.
 

pheenix

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I can sleep on a tree stump. Years of stress, sleeping on 26 hr flights on cargo nets, etc Its the one thing i do enjoy.
 

Dugbet

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In deep stages of dieting I can't get more than 3-4 hours of sleep for weeks. It sucks but it is what it is.

Normally I won't sleep more than 6-7 hours, with good luck. Insomnia is so familiar to me as muscle pain.

I refuse to take any medical aid, except melatonin, which does not cause much effect if the diet is hard.
 

danieltx

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I take sleep very seriously. I get 8-9 hours per night when growing along with 1+ hour naps on off days and around 7 hours per night when dieting. I fall asleep within minutes of lying down and typically only wake at the end of sleep cycles for a piss and / or water.

Here are some of the things I do for good sleep:
  • Wear my CPAP - this includes naps, taking it on vacation, etc.
  • Wear a sleep mask
  • Wear earplugs
  • Phone on do not disturb 10PM - 10AM
  • Limit caffeine to 1-2 cups of coffee in the morning and 200mg preworkout in the afternoon, no other stimulants
  • No TV in the bedroom
  • No electronic devices in bed - bed is for sleep and sex, nothing else
  • Quality mattress - I have a Casper Wave, highly recommended
The hours leading up to sleep are also important:
  • Blue light filter on phone and tablet
  • No overhead lights after 7PM, only lamps
  • TV (living room) turned off 30+ minutes before bed
I get easily the best sleep of my life and implementing these things will likely improve yours.
 

Fit2Serve

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i read some studies about sleep and harmful effects it can have on health.
i had near complete reconstuctive nasal surgery and i now sleep AMAZING!
i used to wake up choking and was a mouth breather.
i sleep soo good now. it was best decision i ever made. and it wass a tough one to make. but glad i did it.
-F
 

hulkboy

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Aug 5, 2006
Messages
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I've been a chronic insomniac all my life. Honestly, I think it stems from having night terrors as a kid and never sleeping, and even though I don't even have nightmares at all anymore, it still kinda sticks. I don't have apnea, thankfully, my brain simply doesn't shut the fuck up. I have varying success with otc things like diphenhydramine, melatonin, but that's as far as I want to go. Valerian root is off and on, as is ZMA. Truthfully, it seems the best I can hope for getting a hold of a med strain good for sleep (currently have blue dream which IS great for sleep) or luckily just fall asleep naturally. I'm not really even sure what else to do and I really, really don't want to go the prescription route...

I feel ya.. My brain is always hyperactive in the evenings. I’ll try all sorts of concoctions to help me sleep. Most just help fall asleep, but not stay asleep.
 

jeroendebleser

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Apr 17, 2018
Messages
1,704
I take sleep very seriously. I get 8-9 hours per night when growing along with 1+ hour naps on off days and around 7 hours per night when dieting. I fall asleep within minutes of lying down and typically only wake at the end of sleep cycles for a piss and / or water.

Here are some of the things I do for good sleep:
  • Wear my CPAP - this includes naps, taking it on vacation, etc.
  • Wear a sleep mask
  • Wear earplugs
  • Phone on do not disturb 10PM - 10AM
  • Limit caffeine to 1-2 cups of coffee in the morning and 200mg preworkout in the afternoon, no other stimulants
  • No TV in the bedroom
  • No electronic devices in bed - bed is for sleep and sex, nothing else
  • Quality mattress - I have a Casper Wave, highly recommended
The hours leading up to sleep are also important:
  • Blue light filter on phone and tablet
  • No overhead lights after 7PM, only lamps
  • TV (living room) turned off 30+ minutes before bed
I get easily the best sleep of my life and implementing these things will likely improve yours.

You're a methodical machine in everything involved in BB'ing daniel, hats off to you!
 

USMuscle9403

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Registered
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Dec 24, 2004
Messages
2,344
Some might say "big deal. That's just more time to do things." But my mom struggled with this for a few years, and she said there were many "nights" when the SUN would come up before she finally fell asleep. She's still living (83 years old) and one of the toughest women I've ever known, but she said there were nights she'd cry because she was so miserable.

I've gone so many consecutive nights on little to no sleep that my body simply just eventually shuts down and forces me to sleep. Crying because I just want to sleep? Been there. I've always functioned pretty damn well regardless but how much better would my quality of life be if it was more consistent? How much longer would I live, what diseases would I not exacerbate or possibly even prevent? Shit, most importantly... HOW MUCH BETTER WOULD MY GAINS BE?! :LOL:
 

muscle96ss

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Jun 17, 2002
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I take sleep very seriously. I get 8-9 hours per night when growing along with 1+ hour naps on off days and around 7 hours per night when dieting. I fall asleep within minutes of lying down and typically only wake at the end of sleep cycles for a piss and / or water.

Here are some of the things I do for good sleep:
  • Wear my CPAP - this includes naps, taking it on vacation, etc.
  • Wear a sleep mask
  • Wear earplugs
  • Phone on do not disturb 10PM - 10AM
  • Limit caffeine to 1-2 cups of coffee in the morning and 200mg preworkout in the afternoon, no other stimulants
  • No TV in the bedroom
  • No electronic devices in bed - bed is for sleep and sex, nothing else
  • Quality mattress - I have a Casper Wave, highly recommended
The hours leading up to sleep are also important:
  • Blue light filter on phone and tablet
  • No overhead lights after 7PM, only lamps
  • TV (living room) turned off 30+ minutes before bed
I get easily the best sleep of my life and implementing these things will likely improve yours.

I think many people don't realize how beneficial good ear plugs are. Eliminating those little noises that we all hear throughout the night, actually makes a huge difference, at least for me.
 

xpoc

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Registered
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Nov 19, 2016
Messages
463
i read some studies about sleep and harmful effects it can have on health.
i had near complete reconstuctive nasal surgery and i now sleep AMAZING!
i used to wake up choking and was a mouth breather.
i sleep soo good now. it was best decision i ever made. and it wass a tough one to make. but glad i did it.
-F

Another issue I have (had). I wake up literally gasping for air because my throat gets stuck shut due to dryness. I do not believe this has anything to do with apnea. It usually occurs when I sleep on my back. I would LOVE to sleep on my back, but when I do, I snore and almost always wake up choking because my throat is stuck. I have a "work around" where I only sleep on my sides AND recently I started using a humidifier to add moisture to the air when I sleep.
 

Fit2Serve

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Apr 5, 2015
Messages
1,833
Another issue I have (had). I wake up literally gasping for air because my throat gets stuck shut due to dryness. I do not believe this has anything to do with apnea. It usually occurs when I sleep on my back. I would LOVE to sleep on my back, but when I do, I snore and almost always wake up choking because my throat is stuck. I have a "work around" where I only sleep on my sides AND recently I started using a humidifier to add moisture to the air when I sleep.
EXACTLY what was happening to me. Awful way to wake up.
-F
 

MethodAir

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Registered
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Jul 9, 2014
Messages
268
Another issue I have (had). I wake up literally gasping for air because my throat gets stuck shut due to dryness. I do not believe this has anything to do with apnea. It usually occurs when I sleep on my back. I would LOVE to sleep on my back, but when I do, I snore and almost always wake up choking because my throat is stuck. I have a "work around" where I only sleep on my sides AND recently I started using a humidifier to add moisture to the air when I sleep.

The net effect sounds similar. CPAP machines can eliminate snoring and breathing disturbances.
 

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