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If you're having trouble getting Metformin

Joltan

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Just wanted to share this those of you on TRT that don't know where to get Metformin legally.

I asked my HRT clinic Dr. if it was something he would prescribe for disease prevention, and he prescribed it to me. $100 for a 3 month supply. They also carry peptides, and even HGH. The HGH is $1,200 a month though. :eek: I think most of this stuff comes from compounding pharmacies, so most likely if your on TRT, they can get it for you.
 

pahlevan

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Metformin is dirt cheap. With A script or various online pharmacies.
 

NEMSZ

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For real ^ I’ve got a pharmacy that has it at like $0.20 per 500mg pill..
 

aphextwin

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He’s messing with you guys. You can’t get it in Florida without a script
 

jeroendebleser

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Just wanted to share this those of you on TRT that don't know where to get Metformin legally.

I asked my HRT clinic Dr. if it was something he would prescribe for disease prevention, and he prescribed it to me. $100 for a 3 month supply. They also carry peptides, and even HGH. The HGH is $1,200 a month though. :eek: I think most of this stuff comes from compounding pharmacies, so most likely if your on TRT, they can get it for you.
American doctors sure are liberal, at least the ones in these anti-aging clinics. Sounds like a bodybuilder's wet dream.

I can only imagine the look on dr's faces over here in Belgium if I went around asking for an HGH-script :D
 

nickels

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American doctors sure are liberal, at least the ones in these anti-aging clinics. Sounds like a bodybuilder's wet dream.

I can only imagine the look on dr's faces over here in Belgium if I went around asking for an HGH-script :D


I think the previously mentioned doctor was the exception, rather than the rule.

Most American doctors would probably react similarly to yours; though I'd love to be proven wrong.
 

Stewie

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Interesting. How true is that article? Wonder what Stewie thinks. According To this doctor berberine is more effective
I prefer my Kool-Aid to be non-cherry flavored and sugar free.
 

superbigd

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Can you expand Stewie? I mean there’s other doctors and studies that have come out stating that berberine is close to as if not more effective than metformin in treating t2 diabetes. Plus you have the fact that metformin can slow down your thyroid whereas berberine doesn’t.
 

Stewie

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Interesting. How true is that article? Wonder what Stewie thinks. According To this doctor berberine is more effective

I don't have the time to get overly involved, as I and others have repeatedly spoken out on both of these. I will leave you with a few exceptionlly taken out of context side effects with Met that gets WAY blown out of proportion, is that of induced lactic acidosis and altered thyroid hormones.

Sure metformin has its pitfalls, as does berberine.



So both of you understand, that link is owned and written by Ken Stephens and not that of Dr. Jonathan Wright. In so, Both, Mr. Stephens and Dr. Wright like to injudiciously selectively pick their mediocre "inconclusive and observational studies". What's even more troubling is the dubious masquerading they purpose as if berberine comes without consequence.

I've known of Dr. Wright's stance on Met vs berberine for quite some time. In which doesn't change my perspective of either drug, yes one is a synthetic compound and the other is considered a botanical or classified as a nutraceutical (medicinal medicine) by some practitioners. Undoubtedly, both have very similar PK/PD properties, tho we can only label one a drug according to the FDA. Mainly in part of that as quoted below:



Dietary supplement products are allowed to make claims about maintaining structure or function of the body. However, products are not allowed to make claims about diagnosis, treatment, cure, or prevention of a disease.
Yet when we thumb through the rubbish of clinical literature on any said botanicals, what's the main theme of theses studies? For the most part they're noticing "drug like effects", correct? So, in the context of the this, does this mean there's no possible adverse effects that comes from these botanicals since it's not truly classified as a drug, per se? Maybe these incoherent buffoons should further their research on what berberine has been purposed to affect, such as; cytochrome isoenzymes, organic cation transporters and testicular gene expression of 3ẞ-HSD, 17ẞ-HSD1 and 3 to name a few. I can cherry pick, too.




In fact, a substantial meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, which included 36 893 patients, concludes that treatment with metformin is not associated with an increased risk of lactic acidosis. Also, there is no difference in the levels of lactate between metformin and placebo or other treated groups
(Salpeter SR, et al 003 Nov 24;163(21):2594-602)



As for the incidence of hYPERthyroidism (low TSH) not hYPO. This again, the said oppositionals against Met have a propensity to cherry pick their citations without further investigations to quantify their small population based observational studies.

A retrospective review of 4 patients with chronic hypothyroidism suggested that metformin is involved in reducing TSH level (Vigersky et al. 2006). It is worth noting that this was an isolated effect on TSH without any relevant changes in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels. After this first report, great interest has aroused in the effects of metformin on thyroid function in patients with T2DM. A meta-analysis including 7 studies that evaluated changes in TSH levels in patients receiving metformin, showed a reduction of TSH levels both in overt and in subclinical hypothyroidism, with no change in euthyroid patients (Lupoli et al. 2014).

Following these initial findings, a number of studies were performed to elucidate the effect and mechanism of metformin on TSH level (Table 1). In a longitudinal population-based study, 5689 T2DM patients treated for hypothyroidism and 59,937 euthyroid patients with T2DM were included (Fournier et al. 2014). Metformin monotherapy was associated with an increased risk of low TSH levels in patients with treated hypothyroidism, whereas this was not observed in euthyroid patients. In a retrospective clinical study, Distiller et al. (2014) revealed an association not only between diabetes and hypothyroidism but also between the metformin therapy and a significantly lower prevalence of diagnosed hypothyroidism.
(Xianghui Meng et al, April 2017)

I'll end by saying, both of these individuals, along with others tend to cherry pick and sugar coat their very weak " "inconclusive and observational studies" then declare incontrovertibly as fact.



I'm not hating on berberine. Tho, these oppositionals fail to mention the possibilities of consequent.



Do yourself a favor and explore refuted citations. Then choose your poison as you may please. :)
 

superbigd

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I don't have the time to get overly involved, as I and others have repeatedly spoken out on both of these. I will leave you with a few exceptionlly taken out of context side effects with Met that gets WAY blown out of proportion, is that of induced lactic acidosis and altered thyroid hormones.

Sure metformin has its pitfalls, as does berberine.



So both of you understand, that link is owned and written by Ken Stephens and not that of Dr. Jonathan Wright. In so, Both, Mr. Stephens and Dr. Wright like to injudiciously selectively pick their mediocre "inconclusive and observational studies". What's even more troubling is the dubious masquerading they purpose as if berberine comes without consequence.

I've known of Dr. Wright's stance on Met vs berberine for quite some time. In which doesn't change my perspective of either drug, yes one is a synthetic compound and the other is considered a botanical or classified as a nutraceutical (medicinal medicine) by some practitioners. Undoubtedly, both have very similar PK/PD properties, tho we can only label one a drug according to the FDA. Mainly in part of that as quoted below:





Yet when we thumb through the rubbish of clinical literature on any said botanicals, what's the main theme of theses studies? For the most part they're noticing "drug like effects", correct? So, in the context of the this, does this mean there's no possible adverse effects that comes from these botanicals since it's not truly classified as a drug, per se? Maybe these incoherent buffoons should further their research on what berberine has been purposed to affect, such as; cytochrome isoenzymes, organic cation transporters and testicular gene expression of 3ẞ-HSD, 17ẞ-HSD1 and 3 to name a few. I can cherry pick, too.






(Salpeter SR, et al 003 Nov 24;163(21):2594-602)



As for the incidence of hYPERthyroidism (low TSH) not hYPO. This again, the said oppositionals against Met have a propensity to cherry pick their citations without further investigations to quantify their small population based observational studies.



(Xianghui Meng et al, April 2017)

I'll end by saying, both of these individuals, along with others tend to cherry pick and sugar coat their very weak " "inconclusive and observational studies" then declare incontrovertibly as fact.



I'm not hating on berberine. Tho, these oppositionals fail to mention the possibilities of consequent.



Do yourself a favor and explore refuted citations. Then choose your poison as you may please. :)
Can you break down what you mean by the bold above as it relates to cytochrome isoenzymes, organic cation transporters and testicular gene expression of 3ẞ-HSD, 17ẞ-HSD1. What does this mean? In really simple terms no long explanation needed. Do you see any harm in running berberine long term? Appreciate your wisdom
 
Last edited:

Stewie

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Cytochrome isoenzymes have several functions, too many to get into details. As cited below, the focus is on drug-drug interactions when berberine is used in-conjunction with other drugs that are primarily metabolized by these isoenzymes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4898966/
Repeated administration of berberine (300 mg, t.i.d., p.o.) decreased CYP2D6, 2C9, and CYP3A4 activities. Drug-drug interactions should be considered when berberine is administered
Apart from a few other enzymatic pathways, 3β-HSD, 17β-HSD1, 17β-HSD3 are enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, e.g, estrogen subtypes, progesterone subtypes and androgenic hormones. Essentially in a nutshell. Berberine has been purposed to alter the biosynthesis of these pathways.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/scialert.net/fulltext/amp.php?doi=jbs.2013.271.276
These observations suggested that berberine might disturb sex-hormone synthesis pathway; consequently possibly resulted in modification of estrogen or testosterone synthesis. Therefore, a caution should be noted for the use of berberine as an alternative medicine, especially at high dose or long period.
And for organic cation transporters. As like cytochrome isoenzymes, the organic cation transporter system functions as a facilitator (vehicle) to several different drug classes. In which can affect the tissue distribution and elimination of selective drugs that are dependent on OCT.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12272-014-0510-6


It's not limited to just "berberine-metformin" interaction.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/ecp.10.60
 
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