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Niaspan and lipolysis

juicin

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Sep 30, 2005
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So my doc wants me on niaspan. Total cholesterol was 187, which isnt that bad but my HDL was 31.

How long does it take HDLs to return to normal after heavy cycling? (I ask this because i have been cruising for about 6 weeks before i got the bloodwork done - i am wondering if possibly it is just a slower process than i think for HDLs to come back up to normal range?)

I have heard that Niacin blunts lipolysis. Any truth to this?
 

Quad-smack

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one of many...


How does nicotinic acid modify the lipid profile?
M. John Chapman
+ Author Affiliations

Dyslipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Unit U 551 INSERM Hôpital de la Pitié 83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
Corresponding author. Tel: +33 1 42 17 78 78; fax: +33 1 42 17 78 78. E-mail address: [email protected]
Abstract

An atherogenic dyslipidaemic phenotype, characterized by low HDL-cholesterol levels, hypertriglyceridaemia and small, dense LDL, is commonly observed in patients with type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome, or pre-existing cardiovascular disease and is inadequately addressed by current guidelines for the management of cardiovascular disease. Moreover, low HDL-cholesterol, in particular, is common among patients treated for dyslipidaemia and is little affected by statin treatment. Incomplete suppression of lipolysis by insulin in the fed state in insulin-resistant subjects leads to increased lipolysis in adipose tissue with elevated circulating free fatty acids (FFA). This metabolic abnormality leads directly to the development of the atherogenic dyslipidaemic phenotype. Nicotinic acid increases levels of HDL-cholesterol, probably largely through suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes secondary to activation of specific, G-protein-coupled nicotinic acid (HM74A) receptors. The reduction in FFA flux after nicotinic acid treatment also results in reduced levels of circulating triglycerides, mainly in the form of VLDL, and increased size and buoyancy of LDL. Treatment with nicotinic acid equally increases the size of HDL particles, which may promote increased reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaque via the ABCG1 cholesterol transporter. The effects of nicotinic acid on the lipid profile are thus potentially anti-atherogenic and may address a major source of cardiovascular risk in insulin-resistant populations, such as those with the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease.

Key words
HDL-cholesterol Atherosclerosis Dyslipidaemia Nicotinic acid Niacin Lipolysis
© The European Society of Cardiology 2006. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]
 

Quad-smack

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Take a look at this graph:
https://eurheartjsupp.oxfordjournals.org/content/8/suppl_F/F54/F2.large.jpg
Notice that at 4 hours, circulating FFA levels are very reduced (indicating a suppression of lipolysis) - but also that it is greatly elevated at 8 hours. My theory is that there is an increase in lipolysis around the 8 hour mark because reduced circulating FFA levels (at 4 hours) result in an increased release of Growth Hormone - which increases lipolysis.
There are other nutritional products that almost work as well as niacin. If interested, PM me.

EDIT: Just re-read your post. It appears your MD is concerned about your HDL levels. You have a good Dr. there. Niaspan is one of the most effective agents for raising HDL levels. Talk to your MD some more about this issue...
 
Last edited:

juicin

Member
Registered
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
651
Take a look at this graph:
https://eurheartjsupp.oxfordjournals.org/content/8/suppl_F/F54/F2.large.jpg
Notice that at 4 hours, circulating FFA levels are very reduced (indicating a suppression of lipolysis) - but also that it is greatly elevated at 8 hours. My theory is that there is an increase in lipolysis around the 8 hour mark because reduced circulating FFA levels (at 4 hours) result in an increased release of Growth Hormone - which increases lipolysis.
There are other nutritional products that almost work as well as niacin. If interested, PM me.

EDIT: Just re-read your post. It appears your MD is concerned about your HDL levels. You have a good Dr. there. Niaspan is one of the most effective agents for raising HDL levels. Talk to your MD some more about this issue...
Quadsmack,

I'm glad you chimed in on this one. It was actually one of your posts that came up in a search when i searched for niacin and lipolysis suppression.

Do you think the lipolysis suppression caused by niacin is enough to cause noticeable weight gain?

My doc said the same thing you did about the HDL levels - that Niacin is the absolute best for raising them. If you do have another alternative in mind let me know and ill see what he thinks.

I was shocked how low my HDL was. Do HDL levels usually take a while to elevate again after heavy cycling? (Test was all that was used, btw)

I was on a cruise (200mg/weekly) for 6 weeks before taking the blood test.
 

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