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So, Who Logbooks and Who Doesn't?

Elvia1023

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Well I have a log on here but I am not one for logging all my training. I have never had a logbook. I can remember my workouts in my head so I may write details in my log but I am not chasing weight all the time. I am more about long term progression when it comes to weights and not so much workout to workout.
 

Fa Seeshus

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In college my training partner couldn't remember his lifts so I bought him a logbook just like mine. After a month I was wondering why this hadn't fixed his memory problem--so I stole his logbook while he was taking a piss. Turns out it was just filled with Chicks' names, a physical description, what he had talked to them about and their phone #. It was all super organized with like columns and rows for the info too😆

So yes, logbooks can be useful.
 

TheOtherOne55

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newb tool imo.
useful tool for younger guys
after time and alot of gains i just dont think its realistic to continue to beat previous lifts. if it were true id be squating 2,000lbs lol
so, it has its place in the beginning i think but being a veteran lifter i think its a lil tedious and not important at all. like not at all.
-F2S

I understand your rationale but I actually think it's a much better tool for the vets.
IMO, newbies have no idea where failure is. There's a reason why some kid will bench 180x6 and then if a trainer is over him yelling he can suddenly get 5 more reps. Their understanding of "burning" and "soreness" and true failure is so so off. It's so much better to hand them a program with volume and just get them progressing through small jumps in overall volume.

I think people tend to not understand progressive overload and use the "well if it really worked wouldn't we all bench 600lbs by now" argument. Like a bunch of other guys have mentioned, progressive overload isn't just about weight. Tempo, rest period, weight, etc....ALL used to progress.

People also tend to think its a quick way to get hurt...which is crazy in my book. Look up anything Dante has talked about when it comes to advanced trainees and rep range. I dont know one progressive overload guy (sans JP) who tries to progress in the 2-6 rep range. And MOST of the dudes who are playing around with injuries are running 10-20 reps and progressing there. Anyways, sorry to get the thread off course.
 

xpoc

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I do and have done so for years. I am heavily influenced by DC training and progressive overload. The only way I can remember how much weight/reps I did on most equipment is with a log book. (take machine lateral raise or lying hamstring curl for example).
 

danieltx

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I have log books going back years, probably 20+ books. I'm not a genetic freak and I couldn't have made the progress I've made in my physique without them. I actually looked back at a log book from a year ago last night - 1 year ago I was flat benching 405 for 10, now it's 430 for 10. 1 year ago I was rack deadlifting 460 for 10, now it's 500 for 10. 1 year ago I was military pressing 285 for 10, now it's 315 for 10. These aren't newbie gains and I'm not a young kid.

Consistently getting stronger is essential to consistently adding significant amounts of muscle. If you just want to look good to the general population then you probably don't need to log; if you want to be a freaky lean 250+lbs. then you better log.

There isn't one successful business - successful meaning revenue growth year over year - that doesn't track KPIs. Bodybuilding is no different. Barring the 0.001% genetic freaks, you're doing yourself a great disservice if you don't log and try to progress over the short, medium, and long-term. It's one of the main reasons people never reach their goals.
 

tren_plz

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I have log books going back years, probably 20+ books. I'm not a genetic freak and I couldn't have made the progress I've made in my physique without them. I actually looked back at a log book from a year ago last night - 1 year ago I was flat benching 405 for 10, now it's 430 for 10. 1 year ago I was rack deadlifting 460 for 10, now it's 500 for 10. 1 year ago I was military pressing 285 for 10, now it's 315 for 10. These aren't newbie gains and I'm not a young kid.

Consistently getting stronger is essential to consistently adding significant amounts of muscle. If you just want to look good to the general population then you probably don't need to log; if you want to be a freaky lean 250+lbs. then you better log.

There isn't one successful business - successful meaning revenue growth year over year - that doesn't track KPIs. Bodybuilding is no different. Barring the 0.001% genetic freaks, you're doing yourself a great disservice if you don't log and try to progress over the short, medium, and long-term. It's one of the main reasons people never reach their goals.

Couldnt agree more. 90% of ppl here dont know what KPI's are. :geek:
 

Love_to_Bodybuild

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I dont

I stopped after 2017 or 2018 competitions, did it since 2006, have logbook after logbook of training weights, and nutrition logbooks, some fo them my cat chewed up
 

beastmode121

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That takes the fun out of my workout. I remember all weights I’ve lifted.
 

USMuscle9403

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I don't understand the 'it's for young guys' comment. Hell, as I get older I remember LESS... Lol when young, I could do just about what I wanted and still blow past most guys, but I can't get away with as much as I used to. It's also so my weak ass can not push it so hard that I end up getting injured.

Also, as for doing it on the phone as opposed to pen and paper, I'm definitely a pen and paper guy. I just get my jollies from physically writing something down, it feels more personal. Just personal preference.
 

RDS

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I’d never used a logbook until recently but started at the end of last year and I swear i’ve made the best progress I have in years by doing so.

Something about seeing physical written evidence that you’re a little bitch makes you push harder
 

b-boy

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I thought I was done with that bastard log book, but now thanks to fucking Alex im about to dust if off and go to war with it again.

For you old beat up fucks like me, progression comes in many forms, weight, reps, volume..ect. also if your older and beat up then NEVER go below 12 reps that will help tremendously.
 

maldorf

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I've always done one. I still have the one from the night I had my heart attack squatting in 2008. I wrote in it "tired".
 

TheOtherOne55

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I buy a couple cheap notepads every 6 months at Target. And keep 1 in my gym bag with a pen in it.
Cant do the phone stuff, need to actually be able to flip back and check weeks of progress.
 

cracker backer

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been using a log book for a very long time now, but wish I would have sooner.... I like what Dante has more recently talked about for older guys trying to avoid injury, going in the 12-16 rep range and fighting for more reps/upping weight once you get to 16, repeat...getting a strong as possible in that rep range

I use a binder cause I make up my own excel sheets to use for the logbook, lol
 

FK86

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I logbook. I also enjoy writing things out and seeing them on paper. I use a mechanical pencil and just erase to make adjustments. My memory is good enough to know where I came from. I just like having the specifics of what's current.
 

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