• All new members please introduce your self here and welcome to the board:
    http://www.professionalmuscle.com/forums/showthread.php?t=259
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
M4B Store Banner
SPC-210x65
Riptropin Store banner
Generation X Bodybuilding Forum
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Mysupps Store Banner
IP Gear Store Banner
Anabolic Hormones Store Banner
Ganabol Store Banner
Spend $100 and get bonus needles free at sterile syringes
Professional Muscle Store open now
olympus
PHARMAHGH1
Bruce Labs Store banner
gd
Professional Muscle Store open now
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
advertise1
granabolic123
Blackroids-animated-optimized-number-1
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
advertise1
PM-Ace-Labs
advertise1
kinglab
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store

Gene found to cause sudden death in young people. Gotgame?

MR. BMJ

Kilo Klub Member / Verified Customer
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
3,702
Gene found to cause sudden death in young people
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170309150637.htm


Researchers from Canada, South Africa and Italy have identified a new gene that can lead to sudden death among young people and athletes.

The gene, called CDH2, causes arrhythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy (ARVC), which is a genetic disorder that predisposes patients to cardiac arrest and is a major cause of unexpected death in seemingly healthy young people.

The discovery, published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, is the result of international collaboration that began 15 years ago. It is led by a South African team headed by Bongani Mayosi, a professor of cardiology at the University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, along with researchers of the Italian Auxologico Institute of Milan and the University of Pavia. A team of investigators from the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, led by Dr. Guillaume Paré, performed the genetic sequencing, as well as the bioinformatics analysis for the study.

"This is important news for families who have had a young family member suffer a sudden cardiac death, for them to know a genetic cause has been identified," said Paré, who is an associate professor of pathology and molecular medicine with the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.

"Our team was happy to contribute to the finding that a mutation in CDH2 is the underlying culprit in a portion of these patients. This will pave the way for preventative interventions and genetic counselling."

According to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, there are about 40,000 cardiac arrests in Canada each year, and less than one in 10 people are estimated to survive a cardiac arrest that happens outside of a hospital.

Inherited forms of cardiomyopathy often cause sudden cardiac arrest death in young people under the age of 35. In ARVC, the heart tissue is replaced by fatty and fibrous tissue. This process encourages the development of cardiac arrhythmias such as tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, which cause loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest. In the case of ventricular fibrillation, without a ready electrical defibrillation, it causes sudden death in a few minutes.

For 20 years, Mayosi followed a South African family affected by ARVC that had experienced several cases of juvenile sudden death. Excluding all genetic causes known at the time, the Italian researchers sequenced all the coding regions of the genome in two ill members of the family. The genetic mutation responsible for the disease in the family, CDH2, was narrowed down from more than 13,000 common genetic variants present in the two ill patients.

CDH2 is responsible for the production of Cadherin 2 or N-Cadherin, a key protein for normal adhesion between the cardiac cells. The gene's discovery was validated by finding a second mutation on the same gene in another patient with ARVC from a different family. It was known from previous studies that genetically modified mice without this protein tend to have malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death.

The researchers said identifying the gene is important because it helps to clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying ARVC, and it also makes the early detection of ARVC possible in otherwise unsuspecting people.

Often, the diagnostic clinical signs of the disease only become clear after many years. However, if a subject with ARVC is a carrier of a mutation on the gene CDH2, other members of his family who are genetically affected can be identified within a few weeks and preventive strategies could be started immediately. This may lead to a reduction of cases of sudden death in patients with the mutation, the researchers concluded.


Story Source:

Materials provided by McMaster University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:
1.Bongani M. Mayosi et al. Identification of Cadherin 2 (CDH2) Mutations in Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy. Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, March 2017 DOI: 10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.116.001605
 

MR. BMJ

Kilo Klub Member / Verified Customer
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
Nov 15, 2006
Messages
3,702
GG, what are your thoughts on this? Maybe what they are discussing is too rare to worry, but I'm not up to date on a lot of this stuff like you and others are.
 

eaglecall

Banned
Joined
Aug 6, 2011
Messages
942
Good study, its a mutated gene, not a "bad" gene.
Genes can mutate due to environmental factors or nutrient deficiency. In the case of environmental factors, it goes back in great part to nutrient deficiency because the body has its own protection capability through antioxidants. But if these are missing or not in the right quantities, this environmental factors will find their way. There is great potential to minimize the potential effects of a mutated gene through nutrient therapy, and even the possibility to revert that mutation one the course of one or more generations but that science belong to a different field.
 

maldorf

Featured Member / Kilo Klub
Featured Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 16, 2007
Messages
24,115
Good study, its a mutated gene, not a "bad" gene.
Genes can mutate due to environmental factors or nutrient deficiency. In the case of environmental factors, it goes back in great part to nutrient deficiency because the body has its own protection capability through antioxidants. But if these are missing or not in the right quantities, this environmental factors will find their way. There is great potential to minimize the potential effects of a mutated gene through nutrient therapy, and even the possibility to revert that mutation one the course of one or more generations but that science belong to a different field.

They do call it a mutation because it is a variance in the genetic code. It is passed on to offspring though, as is my mutation in the gene coding for prothrombin. It is hereditary. As far as how it got started as a mutation nobody knows. An error in the genetic code like this cannot be changed with any therapy, every cell in your body has that mutation. It is permanent. My mutation is caused by a single nucleotide being switched for another. Just one nucleotide is off. Somewhere along the line perhaps when a gamete was formed there was an error during meiosis that caused this error. Its a substitution error.

My mutation I ended up passing on to one of my daughters. Found out after I had my parents tested that it was my mother that has the gene mutation. Not much you can do about it. The only thing you could do to break the cycle completely would be to not have children or possibly conceive a child and have his/her DNA tested in vitro ,and if the baby has the trait you would have to abort if you wanted to break the chain of passing on the trait. Not something most parents are wanting to do.
 

gotgame

Featured Member
Featured Member
Registered
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
1,371
the only gene I know of to cause sudden death in healthy people is the gene for stupidity....

Somewhat joking.

I think its great that they helped identify that but im not gonna go out and start recommending people get all types of genetic analysis done at this time. Its overkill. If there is a history of sudden cardiac death at a young age not from MI then you should already be seeing a cardiologist and have hopefully been worked up.

There quite a few conditions that can result in sudden death none of which I think anyone should be losing sleep over without a positive family history. Much more of us will likely have either heart issues from atherosclerosis of steroid induced cardiomyopathy because we didnt care enough to prevent it.
 

Forum statistics

Total page views
511,060,649
Threads
125,407
Messages
2,442,768
Members
156,098
Latest member
Brae1116
Top