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Glycemic Load - Help Sort This Out

xcelbeyond

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I'm still trying to get a handle on GI - maybe it's not as important as I'm making it. I've always considered Yams a good carb staple as it is one of the highest polysaccharides (complex carbs). It's about in the middle of the glycemic index though with a rather "high" Glycemic load of 1,326 (line 450 on referenced spreadsheet)

Here where this info is located (GREAT spreadsheet): http://diabetes.about.com/gi/dynami...p://optimalhealth.cia.com.au/GlycemicLoad.xls

Can anyone clarify the significance/importance of Glycemic Load?

xcel
 

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It is there only to complicate things, really. lol
A carbs GI is dropped by other foods that contain either protein or fats and/or if you combine a high GI carb with a low GI carb. The glycemic load doesn't really need to be considered if you follow the basic principles of the GI, itself and eat fats and/or protein with your carbs (unless carbing up with a traditional carb load for a show). Use low GI carbs to start with and when you add in protein and fat, the GI is lowered even more. This is exactly why fat should be cut out of a normal carb load and the protein should be reduced at the same time. Both protein and fats tend to 'get in the way' when it comes to carb loading by lowering the GI of the carbs ingested.

There is also the 'IS' or insulin score but that is another thread entirely. hehe

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xcelbeyond

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Now I'm really confused :)

I can buy that "low GI carbs to start with and when you add in protein and fat, the GI is lowered even more." It's hard to believe that eating a high GI along with fat or protein will lower it in general. That would seem to negate the effect of post-workout carb loading with high GI in your protein drink.

xcel
 

cannibal

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IF the post workout drink was mixed with a rapidly absorbed protein e.g. isolate it wouldn't really affect the uptake.
But have your high GI carbs witha fibre supplement and some flax oil and the total GI for the meal is reduced.
Your belly doesn't see it as a three seperate components, with three different absorbtion rates, but as one as its all mixed up like soup in your belly.
 

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cannibal said:
IF the post workout drink was mixed with a rapidly absorbed protein e.g. isolate it wouldn't really affect the uptake.
But have your high GI carbs witha fibre supplement and some flax oil and the total GI for the meal is reduced.
Your belly doesn't see it as a three seperate components, with three different absorbtion rates, but as one as its all mixed up like soup in your belly.
Exactly. Table sugar is fructose and glucose, combined. Glucose is extremely high and fructose is pretty damned low. Table sugar falls in between the both of them for the reason that cannibal stated above.

xcel - don't get me wrong, protein, fat and fiber don't lower the GI so much that you can make white rice as low as oatmeal. It just lowers it a bit. The other macros and fiber slow the entry of the carb into the bloodstream.

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big_byrd52

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Skip, xcel,

If i understand the GI, it refers to how much a carb will elevate blood sugar thus releasing insulin, correct?

according to this article by John Berardi, the addition of protein to a carb meal raises the amount insulin released.

"Endurance athletes have traditionally been encouraged to consume 1.2 g of carbohydrate per kg of body weight immediately after training/competition (8,10). In addition, they are encouraged to continue this supplementation every 2 hours up until 6 hours after their exercise bout. Recent evidence, however, indicates that the addition of protein to a carb drink can actually increase insulin levels higher than carbs alone (11,12). There seems to be a synergistic insulin release with protein plus carbs."

here is the link to the whole article: http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition/puzzle_2.htm

From my understanding, fats will lower GI by slowing the digestion of the carbs, which creates slower uptake of nutrients thus less insulin released to cover the carbs.
 

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big_byrd52 said:
Skip, xcel,

If i understand the GI, it refers to how much a carb will elevate blood sugar thus releasing insulin, correct?

according to this article by John Berardi, the addition of protein to a carb meal raises the amount insulin released.

"Endurance athletes have traditionally been encouraged to consume 1.2 g of carbohydrate per kg of body weight immediately after training/competition (8,10). In addition, they are encouraged to continue this supplementation every 2 hours up until 6 hours after their exercise bout. Recent evidence, however, indicates that the addition of protein to a carb drink can actually increase insulin levels higher than carbs alone (11,12). There seems to be a synergistic insulin release with protein plus carbs."

here is the link to the whole article: http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition/puzzle_2.htm

From my understanding, fats will lower GI by slowing the digestion of the carbs, which creates slower uptake of nutrients thus less insulin released to cover the carbs.
I should be more clear that when I say protein, I am speaking of whole protein foods. I would imagine that what you are speaking of is adding protein in the form of either whey protein or something similar to an after workout carb drink.

Protein causes an insulin response which is evidenced by the 'new' index - Insulin Score or IS. This clearly shows that things like eggs, as an example, have a much higher insulin response than previously thought. However, most protein sources are still relatively low or insignificant.

The point is this: If you take in low GI carbs and combine them with whole protein foods, fat and fiber, you will get a lower and more sustained blood sugar level. In turn, insulin levels will be controlled and you are good to go.

I sometimes get caught up in over-complicating things and don't want to do that here.

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