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Water Intake - Please see "Vet" Question/Post

xcelbeyond

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Water Intake

I was recently talking with someone about daily water intake. I try and taake in 4-5 quarts ED. I really try and get this much "more" when on than off. This does not include protein drinks, tea or coffee.

Here's my logic to taking this much. You kidneys are heavily taxed with the high amounts of protein ingested. I believe that keeping them flushed with water helps keep them healthy and functioning well. While on gear, I believe it's more important to assure higher amounts of water for kidney health.

Now this person was telling me about a "condition" you can get by drinking too much water - hyponatremia. This is from http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/keepingfit/ARTICLE/toomuchwater.htm - there are a TON of articles if you search using the term "drink too much water."

What happens is that as the athlete consumes large amounts of water over the course of the event, blood plasma (the liquid part of blood) increases. As this takes place, the salt content of the blood is diluted. At the same time, the athlete is losing salt by sweating. Consequently, the amount of salt available to the body tissues decreases over time to a point where the loss interferes with brain, heart, and muscle function.

The official name for this condition is hyponatremia. The symptoms generally mirror those of dehydration (apathy, confusion, nausea, and fatigue), although some individuals show no symptoms at all. If untreated, hyponatremia can lead to coma and even death.

Enough, but not too much. The fluid requirement for the majority of endurance athletes, under most conditions, is about 8 to 16 ounces per hour. There is considerable variation here, of course, due to individual sweating rates, body size and weight, heat and humidity, and running speed, and other factors. Still, much more than this amount of fluid is, in most instances, probably physiologically excessive as well as uncomfortable, as liquid sloshes around in the gut during the activity.

One way to test if you are drinking too much water is to compare your body weight before and after a long run. Normally, people lose weight during the course of a distance event. But over-hydrated individuals typically either gain weight or maintain their starting weight. It is interesting to note, too, that this problem tends to be more of a concern with slower runners, because they are exercising at a lower intensity, and therefore have a lower fluid requirement. Also, the slower runner has more opportunity to consume fluid.

I don't know about any of you, but I have BIG problems with cramps! I get these cramps when I'm on and off gear. The only common denominator is tha amount of water I'm taking. Any thoughts?

xcel
 

Ivan

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Yep

That is why when I am competing in athletic events (from grappling to softball to tennis) I DO drink something that will re-hydrate me AND compensate for electrolyte loss...AKA gatorade...Ya I know sugar is in it, but I never got fat off it LOL!
 
W

wyldeone

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well!

you can infact drink distilled water and In my opinion it is the only way to go as long as you are keeping trace minerals from a multi-mineral and multi-v then you are fine! wyldeone.
 

PHIL HERNON

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Yes

But whats the point? What is the reason for distilled? It will just rob your body of minerals. It has no extra fat burning effects, water depletion effects that make it any different then spring water or filtered tap water.
 

PHIL HERNON

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Distilled water

Uses include Irons, humidifiers, cleaning wounds, etc... This is because it contains only hydrogen and oxygen, no minerals whatsoever. My question is, why is this more beneficial? If it is more beneficial, then why take a multi mineral supplement with it? I always struggled with this during competition, and found that the safest way to go was to keep drinking tap filtered weater. A great bodybuilder named Jeff King told me this when I was a teenager, and I decided to listen to him.
 

homonunculus

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$.02

Studies of endurance athletes exercising in the heat and drinking water (no electrolytes) AD LIBITUM indicate that they can become HYPERnatremic. This is because the concentration of electrolytes in sweat is lower than that of the interstitium and blood (sweat is hypotonic). More water than electrolytes are loss, relatively speaking.

Hypernatremia will inhibit sweating and can contribute to overheating and heat injury. (Essentially, the thirst mechanism does not match the hydration status of the individual when exercising.) Drinking an electrolyte-free fluid in ad lib amounts would counteract this.

HOWEVER, endurance athletes have been told for years that they must drink more than what thirst dictates to maintain hydration (given above info.). During an event like a marathon it is literally impossible to maintain body fluid stores by drinking water. I.e., many endurance athtletes do not drink fluid b/c they are thirsty - they do so b/c they know it will help maintain hydration and performance (another long story). Because the idea is to avoid HYPERnatremia (electrolyte concentration too high), the athlete would drink a low / no electrolyte fluid to dilute the sodium concentration in the blood.

BUT, there now is concern that athletes can (and have) consume(d) so much fluid to overcompensate and end up hyponatremic, which can be just as dangerous. This is the idea that a S. African researcher named Tim Noakes has really been pushing for years.

It is definitely a concern for high level athletes, but not likely to affect most persons doing more moderate levels of exercise in reasonable environmental conditions. (This is not to say that some idiot who stands on a golf course all day drinking gallons of distilled water in 110? heat can't screw himself up.)

As far as for BB'ing, the idea of drinking distilled electrolyte free fluid pre-contenst would be to have greater control of ion intake (which could affect blood osmolarity and hydration status), but to be honest, I doubt there could be much difference between stilled and tap water, unless the tap water were really hard, full of all sorts of mineral deposits. It is possible though.

-Randy
 

Fathead

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PHIL is 100% correct

People have been fooled for years by the marketing of these spring mountain water companies. Unless your drinking water from 3 mile island a good cheap filter on your tap is all you need.

What X brought up has a shorter name and another form of drowning in a sense because your flushing your whole system of it's minerals.

This happens a lot out here in AZ with the dummies that go hiking out here in 115 degree heat and drink too much water and sweat so much they have to be rescued off Camelback because their heart has stopped.

as Phil said there is no extra benefit of these processed waters for your BB diet.
 

xcelbeyond

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This has turned into a very interesting discussion.

Now - back to my issue. I take it that nobody thinks the amount of water I'm taking in is contributing to my cramps?!?!

xcel
 

PHIL HERNON

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Try upping your sodium

If you were deficient in potassium, you wouldnt be able to contract the muscle, maybe even to the point on not being able to get out of a chair.
 

Fathead

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X

Do some research on sodium/potassium flux one or the other is giving you a problem due to a defciency but no your not drinking enough to flush your system I drink two gallons a day in comp time and just a little less off. Bets bet is to just take an extra multi.
 

BIGKIWI

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I drink at least 5 powerade electrolyte replacement drinks a day mostly during training but also throughout the day. I also drink litres of water constantly throughout the day I find if I don't have a cpmbinnation of the two I am always cramping. I can't just drink powerade with little water or vice versa :)
 

PHIL HERNON

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I read that

Powerade, mixed about half and half with water is much more quickly absorbed than just plain water or powerade by itself. This also applies to gatorade.
 

Vein

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Re: I read that

PHIL HERNON said:
Powerade, mixed about half and half with water is much more quickly absorbed than just plain water or powerade by itself. This also applies to gatorade.

Why is that?
 

homonunculus

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Re: I read that

PHIL HERNON said:
Powerade, mixed about half and half with water is much more quickly absorbed than just plain water or powerade by itself. This also applies to gatorade.
Absorption rate of ~4-8% carbohydrate solutions is essentially the same and slightly faster than water. Powerade is an 8% solution, gatorade is a 6% solution. (Remember the ads: "Powerade - a whopping 33% more carbs than gatorade!!!")

Gatorade and Powerade contain fructose and/or sucrose (can't recall which is which now), but you don't know how much of each (the label is not specific). The info. is not available in any of the literature that I have found. I've combed the gatorade sportscience website and can't find diddley. (Buttheads)

On the other hand, ultrafuel has only glucose-based carbs with some K and Na in the mix. The old ultrafuel powder was great stuff, but its hard to get a hold of nowadays. I think Twinlab figured out that the profits were greater selling it in bottles rather than as powder...

-Randy
 

BrooklynJuice

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glycerol has some interesting properties with rehydration
 

BIGKIWI

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Randy in NZ they have to label everything from grams of ingredients right down to all %. Will have read of my powerade label later :)
 

xcelbeyond

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