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Blood Pressure Guidlines

nothuman

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While the prescription drug epidemic is a major issue and a big part of why medical malpractice is the THIRD leading cause of death in the USA, anything above 130/80 IS high blood pressure according to most of the research. I fear high blood pressure more than I fear BP meds.

This is the exception to the rule.
 

bieberhole69

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While the prescription drug epidemic is a major issue and a big part of why medical malpractice is the THIRD leading cause of death in the USA, anything above 130/80 IS high blood pressure according to most of the research. I fear high blood pressure more than I fear BP meds.

This is the exception to the rule.

Agreed--heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Almost all of those with it have high blood pressure.

Stroke and kidney disease are also in the top 10 leading causes of death in the US...again--blood pressure is one of the main factors in both these conditions.

People can think the meds are poison all they want, but they'll wish they have controlled their blood pressure BEFORE problems happen, that's for sure. YES, you should try lifestyle modification first, but oftentimes it simply isn't enough.

Edit: the guidelines are available in full from this link (you'll have to click to download the PDF)

2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults | JACC: Journal of the American College of Cardiology

If you look at the sheer AMOUNT of research done and work put into these guidelines (you'll see it if you even casually scroll through it), you'll find it isn't simply "because pharma wanted to make money" or whatever reason you may think. These guidelines are not made to prescribe drugs, they're made to reduce morbidity and mortality in the population as a whole.

(looks like the link may be crashed / crashing in and out right now...just wait, it'll be back up)
 
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johnjuanb1

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More bs to make big pharma fat. Get everyone on drugs they don’t need.
What a crock of shit!
My grandma has been 160/100 most of her 94 years.
Genetics are everything.
Some people do just fine with bp much higher than what the corrupt FDA wants you to believe.
 

thethinker48

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More bs to make big pharma fat. Get everyone on drugs they don’t need.
What a crock of shit!
My grandma has been 160/100 most of her 94 years.
Genetics are everything.
Some people do just fine with bp much higher than what the corrupt FDA wants you to believe.
I think you'd agree that if your BP is 160/100, it's a good idea to take notice and fix that rather than roll the dice that your genes are good enough for you to last a long time.

Someone with HIV can sneeze blood on you, and there's a chance you'd be fine without a form of drug treatment, but it's best to partake in it anyway because the alternative is far far worse.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

bieberhole69

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More bs to make big pharma fat. Get everyone on drugs they don’t need.
What a crock of shit!
My grandma has been 160/100 most of her 94 years.
Genetics are everything.
Some people do just fine with bp much higher than what the corrupt FDA wants you to believe.

Again, these guidelines have NOTHING to do with big pharma.

Checkout page 57 for nonpharmacological recommendations. Page 61 has a table listing different nonpharm methods and their average reduction of BP with references to the specific studies included in these guidelines that have done the research and shown the benefits.

These guidelines are made for the population as a whole to reduce morbidity and mortality. They do NOT care how you get there, just suggest that you do. If you got on a medication and later on had adjusted your lifestyle to where it was no longer needed, there would be nothing to suggest that you couldn't come off of the medications--so long as you met those goals.

Here's the actual flow chart from the guidelines:

jU6y9IA.jpg


Notice that it recommends nonpharm first and foremost for all treatments. In addition, it does not want to initiate pharmacological therapy at 130/80 unless the 10 year risk of cardiovascular disease is at least 10%. There's plenty of these calculators out there...if you're young, it's not easy to hit that 10%.

Even at 140/90 they still recommend nonpharm therapy.

While your grandma and her genetics may have gotten her to where she is, the majority of the population will see lots of damage from blood pressure that high for that long. These guidelines are intended for the general population, not outliers like her.
 

little slice

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I think you'd agree that if your BP is 160/100, it's a good idea to take notice and fix that rather than roll the dice that your genes are good enough for you to last a long time.

Someone with HIV can sneeze blood on you, and there's a chance you'd be fine without a form of drug treatment, but it's best to partake in it anyway because the alternative is far far worse.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk



But HIV is different because it's progressive..






..and tolerant
 

thethinker48

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But HIV is different because it's progressive..






..and tolerant
Lmao..

These comments are gonna get worse once you're neck deep in your diet

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

Bio

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More bs to make big pharma fat. Get everyone on drugs they don’t need.
What a crock of shit!
My grandma has been 160/100 most of her 94 years.
Genetics are everything.
Some people do just fine with bp much higher than what the corrupt FDA wants you to believe.

Don't use the exception as the rule and ignore the facts.

John, you know I like you but you've always been the reckless guinea pig and the jury is still out on your future...only time will tell. Also, being alive and having quality of life are two different things...the quality of ones life can change in an instant.
 

johnjuanb1

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Don't use the exception as the rule and ignore the facts.

John, you know I like you but you've always been the reckless guinea pig and the jury is still out on your future...only time will tell. Also, being alive and having quality of life are two different things...the quality of ones life can change in an instant.

I guess I’m obviously extremely prejudiced in that i had horrible experiences with blood pressure meds so there’s no way anyone could convince me to use them again. My blood pressure has always been high. It’s genetic with my entire family.
Yes, clonidine HCL is a bad example because it has nasty side effects and is rarely prescribed. My experience was that beginning a few years ago i started getting frequent muscle tears; hamstrings, abductor, both rotator cuffs, left lat insert, left pec, left bicep. For the life of me i couldn’t figure out why. My strength gradually got to the point that i lifted less than a 10 year old girl.
My friend kept telling me it was the clonidine but i feared if i stopped using it i would die because even on it my blood pressure was very high.
Finally, i took his advice and tapered off clonidine and decided no cheat meals ever, and a 3,000 calorie diet. I haven’t had a cheat meal since July.
The funny thing is i learned clonidine has an inverse effect in that if your dose is too high it actually increases blood pressure. After dropping 35Lbs and getting lean and mean my blood pressure improved a lot.
Then, i decided to slowly up my doses and I put back 15Lbs of muscle, my stength has come back quite a bit. My injuries have been healing. Clonidine literally destroys muscle tissue. I’ve never seen any studies on this but i would make an excellent case study proving this fact.
I’m sure my blood pressure is high but not as high as it’s been in the past because i always feel it in the form of angina and vertigo when it’s real high. I don’t check it any more because my OCD will drive me insane again if I do.
 

OutToLunch

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I think Dante or someone else mentioned how the numbers are inflated when going to a medical practitioner that use standard cuffs on hard training lifters with larger arms. Better to purchase a larger cuff and take your own measurements.
 

nothuman

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I think Dante or someone else mentioned how the numbers are inflated when going to a medical practitioner that use standard cuffs on hard training lifters with larger arms. Better to purchase a larger cuff and take your own measurements.

I've said this too many times to count too. I don't trust arm cuffs at most doc offices.
 

bieberhole69

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I think Dante or someone else mentioned how the numbers are inflated when going to a medical practitioner that use standard cuffs on hard training lifters with larger arms. Better to purchase a larger cuff and take your own measurements.

Things like this are actually addressed in the guidelines as well (I know I'm repeating myself here...I'm just trying to show how inclusive they are of all factors).
 

nothuman

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Things like this are actually addressed in the guidelines as well (I know I'm repeating myself here...I'm just trying to show how inclusive they are of all factors).

In the guidelines, yes.
Always enforced, no.

A lot of doctor's offices will use a large cuff and I still don't trust that it's big enough. My readings are always 20-30 points higher at doctor's offices compared to at home. And it's not white coat syndrome all 100 times either.
 

bieberhole69

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In the guidelines, yes.
Always enforced, no.

A lot of doctor's offices will use a large cuff and I still don't trust that it's big enough. My readings are always 20-30 points higher at doctor's offices compared to at home. And it's not white coat syndrome all 100 times either.

I agree, as mine are too. I'm lucky that my doc recognizes this. Unfortunately, I often have problems with nurses trying to shove the small cuff on me (not all do this) -- and the small cuff is only supposed to be on a maximum 14" arm. Sad that I have to point it out to them on the cuff before they'll listen.

Paid for by big pharma.

Page 168 of the guidelines starts the disclosures of authors / reviewers (you'll find this is common practice for research, guidelines, etc to disclose conflicts of interest). Not a single author of this guideline has affiliation with anybody in industry, and most of the reviewers don't either.

In addition, here's the ACC policy on it in full:

Relationships with Industry Policy - American College of Cardiology.
 

nothuman

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I agree, as mine are too. I'm lucky that my doc recognizes this. Unfortunately, I often have problems with nurses trying to shove the small cuff on me (not all do this) -- and the small cuff is only supposed to be on a maximum 14" arm. Sad that I have to point it out to them on the cuff before they'll listen.

Do you find that the large cuffs are big enough? Does putting it on your forearm give more accurate readings? I really never know what to think whenever I'm there.
 

rmtt

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Do you find that the large cuffs are big enough? Does putting it on your forearm give more accurate readings? I really never know what to think whenever I'm there.

We have a wellness nurse onsite every month that checks BP and just goes over healthy lifestyles.

But she uses one that wraps around your wrist. I find that this style runs pretty much the same as the larger cuff I have at home.
 

bieberhole69

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Do you find that the large cuffs are big enough? Does putting it on your forearm give more accurate readings? I really never know what to think whenever I'm there.

Funny you ask...I only recently had it done on my forearm (twice). Systolic was similar to the large cuff, diastolic was about 5mmHg higher.

I know that they typically read it as soon as you get back and if you have a good office, you didn't have to wait too long--so the difference between home / office could simply be that we've been moving around a lot prior to the reading, which will inevitably raise it some.

I'd say as long as you trust YOUR cuff and your measurements at home are consistent, that those are the numbers I'd go off of.
 

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