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So you can’t donate blood, now what!

JOKER

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Jan 10, 2020
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214
So what if you can’t donate blood? This happens a lot because of medical reasons, high BP or high hemoglobin. Whatever the reason, you have options:

1. If you know a nurse, you can always buy a home blood donation kit. I have known many guys to do this on their own, which never would nor recommend. But if you have a friend that’s a nurse, it can easily be done at home every 60 days.

2. Ask your MD for a medica phlebotomy every 60 days. They will just toss the bloods when done.

3. Of you have high BP, consult with an MD always. But there a lot of supplements you can use to being this down. Of course if you are on AS that increase, going off would help. But taking 1-2 Carditone and 5-10mg cialis a day typically dose the trick. Adding cod liver oil and vitamin e is icing on the cake.

4. If you have high hemoglobin or because of past history there is no way you will ever be able to donate, then here is what I recommend....
1T daily cod liver oil
1 cap Unique E
1 Apolactoferin
1 Curcimin
2 IP-6 (Inositol-6-Phosphate)

The last 3 are “iron chelators.” Since hemoglobin carries around 70-80% of the iron in the blood, “chelating” it will naturally brings hemoglobin down.

References:
Weglarz, L., et al. (2008). “Effect of Inositol Hexaphosphate on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Release of TNF-α from Human Mononuclear Cells”
pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0b26/00833995ff38def1db097d0332ff5d58302f.pdf

“It is thought that anti-carcinogenic benefits of IP6 may in part be attributable to its antioxidant capability through its iron chelating properties.”

Human mononuclear cell
Sandberg, A., et al. (1999). “Inositol phosphates with different numbers of phosphate groups influence iron absorption in humans”
ajcn.nutrition.org/content/70/2/240.full.pdf

“Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a well-known inhibitor of iron absorption…”

Anekonda, T.S., et al. (2011). “Phytic acid as a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s pathology: evidence from animal and in vitro models”
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3021000/pdf/nihms234956.pdf
 

Bobik

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Aug 21, 2016
Messages
385
4. If you have high hemoglobin or because of past history there is no way you will ever be able to donate, then here is what I recommend....
1T daily cod liver oil
1 cap Unique E
1 Apolactoferin
1 Curcimin
2 IP-6 (Inositol-6-Phosphate)

The last 3 are “iron chelators.” Since hemoglobin carries around 70-80% of the iron in the blood, “chelating” it will naturally brings hemoglobin down.

References:
Weglarz, L., et al. (2008). “Effect of Inositol Hexaphosphate on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Release of TNF-α from Human Mononuclear Cells”
pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0b26/00833995ff38def1db097d0332ff5d58302f.pdf

“It is thought that anti-carcinogenic benefits of IP6 may in part be attributable to its antioxidant capability through its iron chelating properties.”

Human mononuclear cell
Sandberg, A., et al. (1999). “Inositol phosphates with different numbers of phosphate groups influence iron absorption in humans”
ajcn.nutrition.org/content/70/2/240.full.pdf

“Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) is a well-known inhibitor of iron absorption…”

Anekonda, T.S., et al. (2011). “Phytic acid as a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s pathology: evidence from animal and in vitro models”
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3021000/pdf/nihms234956.pdf
I reduced iron with IP6 (blood showed a very low level), but my Hematocrit and hemoglobin kept increasing ... Unfortunately, IP6 doesn't solve anything.
 

JOKER

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Kilo Klub Member
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Jan 10, 2020
Messages
214
I reduced iron with IP6 (blood showed a very low level), but my Hematocrit and hemoglobin kept increasing ... Unfortunately, IP6 doesn't solve anything.
Interesting. Worked like a charm for me 👍🏻
 

pickapeck

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Nov 28, 2007
Messages
875
Donating every 8 weeks made my RBCs go up and up. I take 3-4 weeks off with hCG every so often to keep it down. Just TRT seems to keep it close to the top of normal but that is only 100 mg/w. Just a warning, it tends to get worse and worse as you age.
 

Blazed_Noob

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Jan 3, 2005
Messages
1,900
I just donated blood , they said my hemoglobin was 18. She said I would probably feel better after donating.
I have not donated in over 15 years.
I actually did feel a little better a couple days afterwards.
My question is, is 18 a bad number ? Should I try to lower it? , I remember the nurse saying below 20 is normal.
Im surprised it was under 20 considering all the years of abuse and the drugs I have put into my body.
Also would a high hemoglobin affect blood pressure?
 

akajavman

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Registered
Joined
Jul 29, 2014
Messages
199
At 18 and above the viscosity of your blood is like molasses. Which could make you prone to strokes and such. So donating frequently helps bring it down so your blood is pumping easier throughout your body. The problem is if your on gear it raises your RBC and unfortunately lifting and exercising also contribute to this. Body is demanding more oxygen so we produce more RBC.
 

shockmaster9000

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Dec 27, 2016
Messages
50
Go to the feed store. Buy the 16g needles. Some water bottles are 1 pint exactly. Drill two holes in the lid, one for the hose and one for a breather. Tie an arm off to pump up the veins and go to work. The needle work does take practice and is not pleasant. Oh, take some asprins that morning to help with viscosity.

This is what I did after 3 blood bus attempts. It was always some damn thing... They couldnt get their cpu up and running.. or they were all booked up, etc etc. Finally I threw my arms up and said "Ill do it live!!" As grizzly as it sounds Im glad I made that decision.
 

Pissbrain259

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Registered
Joined
Nov 30, 2004
Messages
529
I just donated blood , they said my hemoglobin was 18. She said I would probably feel better after donating.
I have not donated in over 15 years.
I actually did feel a little better a couple days afterwards.
My question is, is 18 a bad number ? Should I try to lower it? , I remember the nurse saying below 20 is normal.
Im surprised it was under 20 considering all the years of abuse and the drugs I have put into my body.
Also would a high hemoglobin affect blood pressure?

A "normal range" Hgb for the average adult male is approximately 13.0 - 17.0 g/dL. This usually varies between labs by a few tenths of ONE point (e.g. 13.2 - 17.1 g/dL). A simple method to closely estimate your HCT level is to multiply your Hgb level x 3. So if your Hgb is 18 g/dL, your HCT level is approximately 54. This trick works quite well in real world situations.

While there are many factors to consider when addressing a person's H/H levels, one simple and easily overlooked component is the body's plasma osmolality (POsm) which is basically a measure of water and electrolyte (solute) balance. According to Guyton's Textbook of Medical Physiology, the average adult has a measured POsm of ~288 mOsm/kg. You'd be surprised how much information can be ascertained from someone's plasma osmolality value. If you're wondering, POsm can be ordered on a routine blood test but not many clinicians do so. Why? No clue. Fortunately, clinicians almost always order at minimum a BMP (Chem-7) blood test and using some of those measured values, you can actually closely estimate someone's POsm using an easy to remember equation. Work smarter, I say. ;)
 

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