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Arterial plaque?

sodzl

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Are there any otc supps that can reverse the build up of arterial plaque. Im a milk aholic and i'm concerned about the possible build up.
 

Tom

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More likely inflammation causes atherosclerosis

Inflammation, Heart Disease and Stroke: The Role of C-Reactive Protein


How does inflammation relate to heart disease and stroke risk?

“Inflammation” is the process by which the body responds to injury or an infection. Laboratory evidence and findings from clinical and population studies suggest that inflammation is important in atherosclerosis (ath”er-o-skleh-RO’sis). This is the process in which fatty deposits build up in the inner lining of arteries.

C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the acute phase proteins that increase during systemic inflammation. It’s been suggested that testing CRP levels in the blood may be an additional way to assess cardiovascular disease risk. A more sensitive CRP test, called a highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) assay, is available to determine heart disease risk.

The American Heart Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a joint scientific statement in 2003 on the use of inflammatory markers in clinical and public health practice. This statement was developed after systematically reviewing the evidence of association between inflammatory markers (mainly CRP) and coronary heart disease and stroke.

What’s the role of CRP in predicting recurrent cardiovascular and stroke events?

A growing number of studies have examined whether hs-CRP can predict recurrent cardiovascular disease, stroke and death in different settings. High levels of hs-CRP consistently predict recurrent coronary events in patients with unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction (heart attack). Higher hs-CRP levels also are associated with lower survival rates in these patients. Many studies have suggested that after adjusting for other prognostic factors, hs-CRP is useful as a risk predictor.

Studies also suggest that higher levels of hs-CRP may increase the risk that an artery will reclose after it’s been opened by balloon angioplasty. High levels of hs-CRP in the blood also seem to predict prognosis and recurrent events in patients with stroke or peripheral arterial disease.

What’s the role of hs-CRP in predicting new cardiovascular events?

Scientific studies have found that the higher the hs-CRP levels, the higher the risk of having a heart attack. In fact, the risk for heart attack in people in the upper third of hs-CRP levels has been determined to be twice that of those whose hs-CRP level is in the lower third. These prospective studies include men, women and the elderly. Studies have also found an association between sudden cardiac death, peripheral arterial disease and hs-CRP. However not all of the established cardiovascular risk factors were controlled for when the association was examined. The true independent association between hs-CRP and new cardiovascular events hasn’t yet been established.

What causes low-grade inflammation?

The major injurious factors that promote atherogenesis — cigarette smoking, hypertension, atherogenic lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia — are well established. These risk factors give rise to a variety of noxious stimuli that cause the release of chemicals and the activation of cells involved in the inflammatory process. These events are thought to contribute not only to the formation of plaque but may also contribute to its disruption resulting in the formation of a blood clot. Thus, virtually every step in atherogenesis is believed to involve substances involved in the inflammatory response and cells that are characteristic of inflammation.

In addition, there is also research that indicates an infection — possibly one caused by a bacteria or a virus — might contribute to or even cause atherosclerosis. The infectious bacteria, Chlamydia pneumoniae (klah-MID'e-ah nu-MO'ne-i), has been shown to have a significant association to atherosclerotic plaque. The herpes simplex virus has also been proposed as an initial inflammatory infectious agent in atherosclerosis.

The notion that chronic infection can lead to unsuspected disease isn't foreign to most doctors. For example, bacterial infection with Helicobacter pylori is now known to be the major cause of stomach ulcers. The treatment for this condition now routinely includes antibiotic therapy.

Should I have my CRP level measured?

If a person’s cardiovascular risk score — judged by global risk assessment — is low (the possibility of developing cardiovascular disease is less than 10 percent in 10 years), no test is immediately warranted. If the risk score is in the intermediate range (10–20 percent in 10 years), such a test can help predict a cardiovascular or stroke event and help direct further evaluation and therapy. However, the benefits of such therapy based on this strategy remain uncertain. A person with a high risk score (greater than 20 percent in 10 years) or established heart disease or stroke should be treated intensively regardless of hs-CRP levels.

What is the normal range of hs-CRP level?

If hs-CRP level is lower than 1.0 mg/L, a person has a low risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
If hs-CRP is between 1.0 and 3.0 mg/L, a person has an average risk.
If hs-CRP is higher than 3.0 mg/L, a person is at high risk.
If, after repeated testing, patients have persistently unexplained, markedly elevated hs-CRP (greater than 10.0 mg/L), they should be evaluated to exclude noncardiovascular causes. Patients with autoimmune diseases or cancer, as well as other infectious diseases, may also have elevated CRP levels.
 

wostok

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the biggest reason for arterial plaque is one that is seldom mentioned. but its the chlorine in your drinking water.

Boil the water or let the water sit for a couple of hours and the chlorine will leave on its own.
 

Magnum

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According to Dr Rath you can. Check out this book. "Why Animals Don't Get Heart Attacks ... But People Do!" He recommmends the formula below. He has done studies using an EBT scan and seen reversal of plaque around 10 to 20% in six months if I remember correctly. The book explains the science behind it and the formula is dirt cheap and sold by a lot of places. The one I pasted here has their formulas lab assayed.


Heart Plus: Vitamin C, L-Lysine and L-Proline: Quality Discount Nutritional Supplements!
 

J_Diggs

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Are there any otc supps that can reverse the build up of arterial plaque. Im a milk aholic and i'm concerned about the possible build up.
Just going back to the original concern...what does milk consumption have to do with arterial plaque build up? Excuse my ignorance but most recent studies I've been privy to show more of a correlation between reduced mortality with regard to coronary heart disease and stroke due to higher milk consumption.

Anyone have anything to note otherwise?

I, along with everyone in my family, drink an ish-load of milk on a daily basis (skim) so I was hoping for some clarification.
 

Tom

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Tom,
Short of that, save the bullshit you spew
the bullshit that i spew comes from the american heart association. i don't have a problem with thier credibility.
 

Cosmicdrifter

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the biggest reason for arterial plaque is one that is seldom mentioned. but its the chlorine in your drinking water.

Boil the water or let the water sit for a couple of hours and the chlorine will leave on its own.
OR you can get a reverse osmosis system and that will do the work.
 

Philthy

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Tom,
The problem with your cutnpaste in the realworld is that a hemmorhoid can cause a high crp.
the treatment remains the same with the same 4 drugs that prevent regardless.

Ace inhibitors are the modluators that reduce imflammation and shown in disease altering therapy to one of the four to stop the process.

Nothing else does except not eating processed foods presumably with less insulin level increase as insulin is toixc to the endolthelium of the arteries.

But cutnpastes of crap articles are not real discourse on the matter. I can play that shit all day long. We call the CRP test the crap test after the 60 minutes write up on it. Just like the reservatrol shit that can never be absorbed but looks good in mice and sells like hotcakes which does no good.

Look, 20% of the population are vulnerable to this genetically. Line five guys up on a wall, one will drop over the years from it.
Spewing crap aint going to change the tried and true methods. If you could give me a pill that helps our patients not die of this. Youd be a billionaire.
Short of that, save the bullshit you spew
You just answered a question I had for years; thank you!!!
If you have any other info similar to this could you pm it to me please.
 

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