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Heavy weight isn't that important if you want to get bigger.

FK86

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I think it comes back to more than one way to skin a cat. Before I knew anything about weight training it was always rooted in me to want to get as strong as possible. When I started following bodybuilding more closely in my late teens, I couldn't believe there was an entire community of people that didn't care about getting stronger.

I think strength is a major component, but not the only component. You can elicit hypertrophy multiple ways. I've just always preferred to do it by having a logbook showing weights and reps increase.
 

johnjuanb1

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2 months ago i blasted hard and gained a lot of weight which made my strength go up every workout for a couple months. My muscle size and thickness grew and grew. Now i have stabilized and shed water, strengt has dropped, and even though i train hard my size is staying the same. Details are improving but size has stagnated. I’m not complaining. I’m very pleased that i was able to grow quickly for awhile. Increase in weights lifted/poundage definitely is the fastest way to grow!!!
 

biglizard225

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I agree with what the article is saying but a lot of people will look right over the fact that its referring to experienced lifters with a good bit of strength already,


I pack on the most muscle even now by gaining strength. But that's only a part of the equation. All factors play into gaining muscls
 

brutus69

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we got guys at my gym who only do high reps and are huge. meaning 5'8, 280, 5'10 300...
we got a few, like nam thomas, placed 4th superheavyweight nationals this year who do heavy-ass weights. squatting 765 for reps. then again he's a bodybuilder/national ranked powerlifter.
the young guys like him do the heavy, the old guys do the light and both groups are big.
course, steroids and genetics are key.
 

nothuman

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There was a study last year that came out that people gained the same amount of muscle on less weight as long as they were tired after the set (more reps). I completely agree with it too.
 

buck

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we got guys at my gym who only do high reps and are huge. meaning 5'8, 280, 5'10 300...
we got a few, like nam thomas, placed 4th superheavyweight nationals this year who do heavy-ass weights. squatting 765 for reps. then again he's a bodybuilder/national ranked powerlifter.
the young guys like him do the heavy, the old guys do the light and both groups are big.
course, steroids and genetics are key.

What I see many big guys doing today is not necessarily what they did to gain their mass originally. What I did to gain my first 40lb's of muscle is not what I was doing to gain the last 10lb's of muscle.
 

jpkoepse

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Push to absolute failure benching 225 for 45 reps... or you can bench 405 for 12 at failure... seems like the results are very similar.. however I think most people have a much easier time pushing really hard for short period of time (set of 12 to failure which prob lasts 20 secs?) versus an all out set of 45 reps with much lighter weight which might take over a minute.. not to mention if your cardiovascular system isn't up to par... you'll crap out because of that before you reach true muscular failure... Just my perspective! Intensity is everything at the end of the day.
 

ihab001

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Compound exercises like rows, deadlifts , squats , yes these require from you to challenge to lift heavier as long as form is perfect because these exercises are the most responsible of growth of the whole body , and on the opposite yes for sure if you are doing triceps extensions ur going to reach muscle breakdown and growth if u use lighter weight and keep doing reps till fatigue , what I would advice any body is to be wise not to get injured just cuz u want to think that lifting heavy is what u need ,


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Reno911

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I feel that as one gets older 30's-40's plus, they are much better off using a volume approach and/or pre exhaust techniques, super sets, giant sets, etc, etc.

Yes, some guys are genetic freaks "joint wise" and have indestructable connective tissue and can handle heavy weights/low reps as they age. Most of us however will breakdown and training styles need to be changed.

Look at Palumbo. Only trained very heavy low volume. He's 49 and hasn't trained in 10 years and had full shoulder replacement and his other shoulder is fucked and he looks half crippled. I think we all know that it took it's toll on Ronnie and many others as well. (Dusty H would be an exception here but I don't think he'll be training the way he does no when he's 40+)

Then look at guys like Dexter, Cutler, and many other who trained more volume style. Way healthier for joints in the long run.

Yes, a guy in their 20's should be doing heavy benches, chins, deads, squats, etc to "build the base" especially in the first few years of training but the training style and volume needs to change as the lifter ages. I'm not say train like a pussy but as mentioned above, there are plenty of ways to skin a cat.
 

dale338

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I feel that as one gets older 30's-40's plus, they are much better off using a volume approach and/or pre exhaust techniques, super sets, giant sets, etc, etc.

Yes, some guys are genetic freaks "joint wise" and have indestructable connective tissue and can handle heavy weights/low reps as they age. Most of us however will breakdown and training styles need to be changed.

Look at Palumbo. Only trained very heavy low volume. He's 49 and hasn't trained in 10 years and had full shoulder replacement and his other shoulder is fucked and he looks half crippled. I think we all know that it took it's toll on Ronnie and many others as well. (Dusty H would be an exception here but I don't think he'll be training the way he does no when he's 40+)

Then look at guys like Dexter, Cutler, and many other who trained more volume style. Way healthier for joints in the long run.

Yes, a guy in their 20's should be doing heavy benches, chins, deads, squats, etc to "build the base" especially in the first few years of training but the training style and volume needs to change as the lifter ages. I'm not say train like a pussy but as mentioned above, there are plenty of ways to skin a cat.

I'm 50, been in the gym since I was 14 and haven't yet changed my training methods. Still lift with the same intensity. My only injury of any significance all those years is a pec tear three years ago. Took a year to fully heal, but still able to partially train during that year. I rebuilt it right and now can lift like I always have. I am starting to notice subtle changes through. Longer rests between sets, a little more stiff, so I'm sure within a year or so, I'll have to slow down. But for as long as I can, I will lift the best ways that I can.
 

FK86

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Heavy is relative, progression is key.
 

Fit2Serve

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completely agree

Jay Cutler is prime example of someone not known for heavy lifting yet was a mass monster. Muscle just needs stimulus and drugs and food. imo stimulate and no need to annihalate.
the guys going crazy with heavy weight arent too wise imo. you risk injury and prob make recovery harder.
ronnie and jay battled it out for years. one known for heavy lifting one not. one had double hip replacement one did not. both mr. olympias:lightbulb:
-F2S
 

GreenTLB6

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This is completely relative.
If you are trying to put a shit ton of muscle on then guess what...you better be trying to increase loads consistently.

If you already have the desired mass and just looking to refine then Backing down a bit will likey let you hold your muscle.

The same could be said with drugs. More to gain. Less to maintain once acquired.

Jay cutler didn’t lift heavy? The guys been filmed benching 405 for reps. TBar rowing stupid weights. Squatting 500 for reps. Jay lifted heavy and only cut back when desired muscle was accrued.
 

Fit2Serve

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This is completely relative.
If you are trying to put a shit ton of muscle on then guess what...you better be trying to increase loads consistently.

If you already have the desired mass and just looking to refine then Backing down a bit will likey let you hold your muscle.

The same could be said with drugs. More to gain. Less to maintain once acquired.

Jay cutler didn’t lift heavy? The guys been filmed benching 405 for reps. TBar rowing stupid weights. Squatting 500 for reps. Jay lifted heavy and only cut back when desired muscle was accrued.

like some have said its relative. i knew a guy that was freshman in college and easily did 405 bench for reps easily. so it wasnt heavy for HIM.
i dont remember jay doing 800lbs deads and the insane stuff ronnie did. ever.
Serge Nubret comes to mind also. known for lots of reps so not heavy weight.
-F2S
 

OutToLunch

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Lee Boyce is knowledgeable but the physique he’s built is not impressive to me.
 

TheOtherOne55

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I suggest everyone here go read Fortitude Training or some science books quick.

I PL for several years and lived off heavy weight.
I DO NOT have the genetics to stay lean very long...i have those football, lift heavy and hard genetics. BBing (at least to me) is about not getting fat.
But with that being said, there are SEVERAL ways to grow.

Muscle loading, muscle damage and metabolic stress are 3 different ways to force hypertrophy. Muscle loading is exactly what it sounds like...heavy ass weight that you try and beat. DC, fortitude, log book training...all of that shit pushes this to the max.

I honestly think a blend of all 3 (Fortitude is great at this) is the best way.
When i did logbook (jordan peters type) training for a year then switched to volume more muscle damage and metabolic work....my body responded well. It's in everyone's best interest to jump back a forth and mix the 3 up a little.
 

Elvia1023

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Heavy weight can be important to getting bigger but it is not needed/essential. I lift very heavy and push my body to the extremes so it's not what I practive. However, I think 100% many could build a fantastic and very large and lean physique with not lifting very heavy. People don't need to be benching 5 plates a side and deadlifting 8 a side to get a big chest and back.

Pump style workouts with perfect form and intensity with a progressive diet and drug regimen could do all you need. For many going super heavy often just leads to more injuries. I see loads of guys with great chests who don't press more than 2 plates a side. Guys with great arms who don't lift heavy weights for arms and the list goes on.

I think diet is more important that lifting heavy and of course drugs come into play too. A guy loaded up with slin and hgh and pumping nutrients into the muscle cells whilst training and gorging on quality food throughout the day could be massive and ripped (and avoid injuries).

Progression in training is very important and that could be done in many ways. Neverthless it should go without saying that for most I recommend progressing in strength whilst maintaining good form. My goal this year is to get to 5 plates a side on bench and I have similar goals for every movement so again I will state the above with 100% certainty but don't personally follow it.
 

buck

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Jay Cutler talks of benching 550 for 2 reps and squatting almost 700 in his early years. Rather heavy by most people's standards.
 

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