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Looking for a good study on relative strength

tkav1980

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Hey guys, im hoping someone can point me in rhe right direction as this is just for personal curiosity.
Im looking for a study that explains alparrent differences in relative strength that explains what's actually going on. For example mechanical advantages vs actual increased contractile force.
The purpose is to understand why a 300 lb bber doing 365 on an incline is considered strong, when much smaller people can do the same thing.

Im looking for the actual data and not common sense answers like range of motion, total work over distance...etc.
Im trying to learn how these things are actually calculated and what variables are taken into account.
 

TheOtherOne55

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Im confused on what answer youre looking for.

1. Are you asking why it is physically possible for a 200lb guy to incline bench 365?
2. And why its physically possible for HIM to do that, as well as a 300lb BBer?
3. Are you asking why, in comparison to the 300lb BBer, is it considered strong? (that is just a mental bias we have from a lifetime of being in a gym, nothing to do with studies)
 

DarrenG29

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I also don’t quite understand the question asked

what makes one stronger isn’t just bodyweight you can be 300lbs and not bench 405 incline for example

there’s many factors one being how big your joints are and the strength of your tendons some are born with double the tendon strength of others

example Larry wheels not big joints but extremely strong tendons.

look at chimpanzee they can rip a door of a car there tendon strength are ridiculous
 

tkav1980

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Im confused on what answer youre looking for.

1. Are you asking why it is physically possible for a 200lb guy to incline bench 365?
2. And why its physically possible for HIM to do that, as well as a 300lb BBer?
3. Are you asking why, in comparison to the 300lb BBer, is it considered strong? (that is just a mental bias we have from a lifetime of being in a gym, nothing to do with studies)
I should have asked my question better.
Im looking for studies that outline the process in determining the cause or causes of relative strength.
How contractile force, mechanical advantages due to body structure and any other variables come into play to determine how how strong someone is, can be and why there appears to be large differences in strength when you look at it as pound for pound strength.
I completely understand the basics of leverage and other mechanical advantages, total force output...etc. im trying to understand how the data is exactly derived.
What are the variables, how is each component calculated and is there an absolute value you can apply when adjusting for all variables.
Rather than Google and hope to find the correct abstract or course material, im hoping someone on here has come across this or has an information source I may miss or not be aware of.
 

Kaladryn

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I get what you are asking, unfortunately, these studies don't really exist. There are so many problems with studying this stuff in humans and ultimately very little interest in research. You can find some very specialized stuff, like biopsies of shoulder muscles in Olympic swimmers to determine ratio of slow to fast-twitch muscle, or the NBA giving MRIs to knees of draft picks and estimate the potential for injury.

That being said I do think I can answer your question:

1. Strength is largely a factor of muscular development, muscle cells look very similar individually and are going to have similar mechanical strength, all other things being equal.

2. Incline bench press is a combination of several muscles working together, the bodybuilder is probably trying to develop his pectorals, and is trying to do the exercise with his pectorals, his mind is inside the muscle and he is making it work as hard as possible, more weight in this situation may ruin this effect. It is very unlikely that is as much weight as he can lift. Bodybuilding, developing muscles, is about figuring out what is "enough." More is not always better. Bodybuilders generally don't care how much weight they are using, your muscle has no idea how much weight you are using, it only knows how much mechanical stress it is under and for how long.

3. Nerve recruitment is also a huge factor in strength, the entire muscle never fires at once, only a percentage of it does, some people can recruit much more at a time, some less. All other factors being equal, people who recruit more would fatigue faster than those that could recruit less at a time.

4. What is "strength"? Weight lifted over 3 seconds? over 30 seconds? Ability to lift weight periodically over hours? The more developed muscle is going to have an advantage somewhere (the more developed muscle can also have disadvantages, like most byproducts of anaerobic metabolism to clear).
 

Kaladryn

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BTW, my above post is based on the premise of "all other things being equal." Obviously, there are huge individual mechanical differences that come into play in any movement, especially compound movements. Bench press, lying on your back on a narrow bench and pressing straight up, is a non-functional movement that some people have a better structure for than others. That same "poor" structure on bench is probably good structure on something else compared to the person with "good" bench structure.
 

tkav1980

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BTW, my above post is based on the premise of "all other things being equal." Obviously, there are huge individual mechanical differences that come into play in any movement, especially compound movements. Bench press, lying on your back on a narrow bench and pressing straight up, is a non-functional movement that some people have a better structure for than others. That same "poor" structure on bench is probably good structure on something else compared to the person with "good" bench structure.
Im reading into the process involved in force output and im running into what you describe. Theres a lack of all of the information in a single place. I can find information on the mechanics and physics involved for each component but nothing concise for an entire system.
Oh well, ill keep looking.
 

Stonewall58

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I think what you’re looking for would be Nerve Innervation. Both intramuscular innervation (the ability to contract muscle fibers at a given rate and in totality) and coordinated muscle innervation (this would include the multiple muscles coordinating contraction - the more synchronized the more explosive).
Im reading into the process involved in force output and im running into what you describe. Theres a lack of all of the information in a single place. I can find information on the mechanics and physics involved for each component but nothing concise for an entire system.
Oh well, ill keep looking.
 

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