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Anyone successful in healing elbow tendinitis?

Landmonster

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Aug 5, 2007
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Guys,

I have been battling elbow tendinitis in one elbow now for 2 years.

An MRI showed that I have a partially torn tendon, combined with elbow bursistis, and tendinitis.

I'm not even sure how this happened, except by going too heavy too soon a few years ago on flat bench and skull crushers. It got aggrivated quickly and has never fully healed.

I have tried:

  1. Oral NSAID (prescription) - This took the pain away for 1 month, but it returned when I quit.
  2. Topical NSAID + anti-inflamatory (prescription) - This took the pain away for 1 month, but it returned when I quit.
  3. BPC-157 injections for 1 month - I tried a few courses of these, spaced out over a year. This seemed to help, but did not fully cure it.
  4. Curcumin supplement - This made little difference
  5. Cisus supplement - This made little difference, but I still take it anyway

Obviously I have tried resting it too. Nothing seems to help.

I cannot do flat benching, or heavy direct tricep work at all. I can do overhead presses and incline presses, if I warm my elbows up well. :(


Ironically, if I wrap the hell out of my elbows (using lifting wraps), I can get away lifting heavier through a heavier chest workout without pain.

Is this a solid idea? It doesn't seem to be a real solution, however.


Besides wrapping my elbows, are there any real treatment options I can use?
At this point I am willing to try anything.


Doctors have suggested PRP injections, but they are extremely expensive.
 
Last edited:

Bigunitny

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Find your nearest stem cell center and go for the gold.
Or take therapeutic amounts of NPP
Or heat and ice on elbow and rest
Tumeric, pure CBD OIL, and motrin


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Mastodon

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Look up "Voodoo Flossing", I've used it on my elbows and on a friend who had elbow tendinitis. It really helped both of us with our tendinitis.
 

old timer

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Mark Bell now sells a "Slingshot Compression Cuff" that's meant to deal with tennis elbow. I've used the Band-IT and for me it relieved the symptoms of tennis elbow but never cured me of it. I used a golf club exercise that--now that I think about it--probably strengthened the brachioradialis muscle that Allex referred to. You hold the golf club in you hand like a hammer (straight up in the air) and then you do 8-10 reps of slowly rotating it 90 degrees rotating your wrist across your body and 8-10 reps of slowly rotating it nearly 90 degrees in front of your body (like swinging a hammer).
 

tripleOT

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Paying attention to this one
I've Got elbow Issues id like to solve. Deca does help to some extent.
 

n3mo0101

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I have had a lot of issues with tendinitis in my elbows and it haunted my pressing movements for YEARS. I have finally, finally been able to fix the issue. Here's my advice:

1.) Squat with your hands over the bar in a way where it does not place a lot of stress on your elbow. Sometimes I prefer to stretch my arms all the way out and lay my hands over the bar so that my arms aren't really under much stress from the weight. Sometimes we unkowingly push up on the bar with our arms as we are squatting. This, in combination with the awkward angle and pressure on the elbow joint from the weight, can cause elbow issues.

2.) Foam roll the CRAP out of the area on the outside of your arm right above your elbow joint. Run your hand along the top of your forearm toward your shoulder and apply a lot of pressure just as you pass the elbow. I can almost 99% GUARANTEE that if you massage this area and foam roll there, it will hurt like a mother f*cker but its what you need to do to work it out. The pain causes endorphins and blood to rush to the area and heal it. Do this to the same spot on the inside of your arm. You may feel pain there as well.

3.) Strengthen your forearms so that muscles are balanced!!! Often times we as bodybuilders build forearms in a way that causes muscle imbalance since we are constantly squeezing heavy weight. Take a dumbell and do forearm curls, and then do it the opposite way.

4.) Use tiger balm or ice on the area after foam rolling or massaging.

5.) See someone who specializes in eastern medicine. I took supplements for years to try to help it. Western medicine works best for ACUTE illnesses like diseases and such, but Eastern medicine seems to work better, in my experience, for CHRONIC issues like joint pain. I would highly recommend finding someone who specializes in this type of medicine to help you.

6.) Lower the total volume of your workout. Most people dont NEED to do 4 working sets to see growth. To be honest, I see no difference in growth whether I do 2 HARD Working sets, or 4 workings sets. I found that when I lowered the total volume of my workouts and decreased the amount of sets I was doing I actually progressed MORE because I wasn't putting so much unnecessary stress on my joints. I was overtraining. Now I do 2, MAYBE 3 sets per exercise if I'm using light weight for focus on a squeeze and am having more progress than I ever did when I did 4 heavy working sets. There is nothing set in stone in terms of this sport. What works for one guy may not work for you. As long as I progress every week and keep my nutrition up, I know I'll grow.
 
Last edited:

devenidas

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what curcumin u took ? u didnt say. this is of paramount importance. they all are not created equal.

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gotgame

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Given your MRI findings I would suggest the following

1. Rest ice wraps.

2. Depending on the tear that might not help so you will need to be more descriptive

3. Ultrasound guided steroid injection into the bursa if the tendon tear has a chance to heal on its own.

4. If partial tear but may not heal on there own then PRP combined with local fenestration.


I do on average 2-3 steroid, PRP or fenestrations for similar findings in a week. I follow up with patients at 4 weeks and 12 weeks. Most feel about 50% better in 4 weeks and 90-100% better at 12 weeks. but its important to know what you are treating and what you cant treat with those techniques. MUST be ultrasound guided
 

Bam2874

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I got tendonosis not tendonitis on my elbow about 5 to 6 years ago. Tendonosis is a micro tear in the tendon. It hurt like hell doing anything especially having to squeeze my hand or even raise my shoulder over my head. It happened to me doing skull crushers. I was basically out for 2 years no gym. I let it heal on it's own and avoided using that arm as much as possible. Eventually it started getting better and I started to incorporate working on my forearm strength and going to the gym but taking it lightly. Eventually threw in some ostarine which kind of helped but also could have been the tendon getting used to lifting again but I wasn't going heavy. Every now and then I do experience some discomfort when lifting heavy which I think is the scar tissue but it's not a pain. Could also just be my head fucking with me. I got an MRI as well which was how I was diagnosed.
 
Last edited:

greaser13

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I never had an MRI done, but I had some pretty bad pain on the outside of my elbow, which qualifies as tennis elbow. The exercise in the NYT article I'm linking to below completely cured it in about 8-10 weeks. A friend of mine had similar results. Now though I've got it on the inside tendon which makes it golfer's elbow and it's much harder to get rid of.

I hope this helps and that you find some relief.

https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/25/phys-ed-an-easy-fix-for-tennis-elbow/comment-page-10/?_r=0


_____________
Phys Ed: An Easy Fix for Tennis Elbow?
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS AUGUST 25, 2009 11:54 PM August 25, 2009 11:54 pm


In a medical advance inspired by recessionary thinking, researchers from the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City announced last month that they’ve developed an effective and supremely cheap treatment for chronic tennis elbow. Huddling a while back to brainstorm about inexpensive methods for combating the injury, the scientists glanced around their offices and noticed a homely, low-tech rubber bar, about 8 inches long, which, at the time, was being used for general physical therapy programs. The researchers wondered whether the ribbed, pliable bars, available for less than $20, might be re-purposed to treat tennis elbow. The answer, it soon become clear, was a resounding yes.

Phys Ed
To arrive at that conclusion, the researchers recruited 21 people with chronic, debilitating elbow pain. Ten of them were assigned to standard physical therapy treatment for tennis elbow; this was the control group. The other 11 also received physical therapy, but in addition were taught a choreographed exercise using the rubber bar that they practiced at home. After less than two months of treatment, the researchers terminated the experiment. The early results had been too unfair. The control group had showed little or no improvement. But the rubber-bar-using group effectively had been cured. Those patients reported an 81 percent improvement in their elbow pain and a 72 percent improvement in strength.

“We couldn’t believe” how fast and well the therapy worked, says Timothy Tyler, PT, ATC, a clinical research associate at the Nicholas Institute and one of the authors of the study. “We were seeing improvements in five weeks, even three. It was crazy.”

Tennis elbow, characterized by pain, weakness and inflammation or degeneration of the wrist-extensor tendon that connects to the elbow, is one of those intractable overuse injures that, until recently, yielded very reluctantly to treatment. By most estimates, about half of all competitive tennis players will be afflicted, a statistic that must resonate, painfully, with the pros gathering for next week’s US Open. Tennis isn’t the only predisposing activity, either. Golfers get tennis elbow, as do plumbers, painters, gardeners and accountants. (Heavy briefcases can strain the tendon.)

Treatments range from acupuncture to corticosteroids to surgery, usually with limited — if any — long-term success. But in the past two or three years, doctors and researchers have begun focusing on a particular kind of exercise that has shown promise against other achy tendons, especially the Achilles. The program involves eccentric exercises, which aren’t oddball moves but those in which the muscle lengthens as it tenses. Think of a biceps curl. When you raise the dumbbell, your bicep shortens and tightens. That’s a concentric contraction. When you lower the weight, the muscle lengthens, straining against the force of the weight. That’s eccentric.

“There’s a growing body of research showing that eccentric exercises are quite effective in treating Achilles tendonosis” and other tendon problems, Tyler says.

One of those studies was a well-designed 2007 experiment centered on tennis elbow. Conducted in Belgium, it found that eccentric exercises provided considerable relief. But the exercises had to be performed on expensive machines under medical supervision during repeated office visits. “We looked at those results and thought, there has to be an easier, more cost-effective way,” Tyler says.

Which is how they arrived at the rubber bar technique. He and his colleagues realized that a single, unhurried exercise using a tensile bar that looks like an oversized licorice stick could create an eccentric contraction all along the forearm. In the exercise, a person holds the bar upright at his or her side using the hand connected to the sore elbow, then grasps it near the top with the good hand. The top hand twists as the bar is brought around in front of the body and positioned perpendicular to the ground; the sore hand then takes over, slowly untwisting the bar by flexing the wrist. “Afterward, you should be sore,” Tyler says. “That’s how we know it’s effective.”

Timothy Tyler Dr. Timothy Tyler’s method for doing the exercise with the rubber bar.
Eccentric contractions require the muscle to work against a force, in this case the coiled bar. “You can load a tendon so much more eccentrically” than with concentric exercises, Tyler says. “So we think the process may be remodeling the tendon.” Ultrasound studies by other researchers, including the group in Belgium, have shown that damaged tendons typically become less thick, indicating they are less damaged, after a course of strenuous eccentric exercise.

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Tyler reported his findings at the July annual meeting of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and has been deluged ever since with requests from doctors, physical therapists and patients for more information about how to perform the exercise and where to buy the bar. (Called the Thera-Band Flexbar, it’s available on Amazon.com; the manufacturer donated products for the study, but didn’t otherwise fund it; Tyler is not affiliated with the company.) “It’s not a difficult exercise but it is unique, so I would advise people to be taught by a physical therapist, if possible,” Tyler says. If not, proceed on your own — after, of course, an examination by a doctor; elbow pain can have many causes, not just tennis elbow. “In my opinion, you’re not going to hurt yourself,” Tyler continues, although you should be prepared for a commitment. His patients did three sets of fifteen repetitions every day. Beginners should start with three sets of five repetitions, adding more as the repetitions get easier, Tyler says.

After his study was halted, the members of the control group, still ailing, were offered rubber bars and training. Most of the people in both groups continue to use the bars whenever their elbows twinge, Tyler has heard. Meanwhile, they’ve returned to tennis (or, golf or weight training, which several blamed for their tennis elbow). “I feel strongly that this is making people better,” Tyler says.
 

greaser13

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PRP sounds very promising for all kinds of soft tissue injuries. I just wish insurance companies actually covered it, which they don't (in the US anyway) because it's still considered "experimental."

Given your MRI findings I would suggest the following

1. Rest ice wraps.

2. Depending on the tear that might not help so you will need to be more descriptive

3. Ultrasound guided steroid injection into the bursa if the tendon tear has a chance to heal on its own.

4. If partial tear but may not heal on there own then PRP combined with local fenestration.


I do on average 2-3 steroid, PRP or fenestrations for similar findings in a week. I follow up with patients at 4 weeks and 12 weeks. Most feel about 50% better in 4 weeks and 90-100% better at 12 weeks. but its important to know what you are treating and what you cant treat with those techniques. MUST be ultrasound guided
 

Love_to_Bodybuild

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Active release therapy helped mine when mine got super bad

now a days ice it if it flared, do physical therapy a few times a week, just blood flow to flush blood in there to heal it. Fricton massage can help

whatever you do any exercise that bothers it, drop it asap

also got a sling shot and elbow sleeves that are tight and may help
 
Last edited:

gotgame

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PRP sounds very promising for all kinds of soft tissue injuries. I just wish insurance companies actually covered it, which they don't (in the US anyway) because it's still considered "experimental."

There is a lot of BS things out there that i just laugh at and refuse to do. I also wont use PRP for a lot of things that other doctors do. It has its own limitations.

If anyone knows where to get less expensive PRP kits let me know lol I think we are paying like 120-130 a pop right now but not sure.
 

WhyIncision

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You say elbow tendonitis, but exactly where is it? Lateral or medial?

- Pulse/Continuous ultrasound
- Shockwave
- The Strap (if it's lateral epicondilitis)

REST. If something hurts, stop doing it.
 

Landmonster

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You say elbow tendonitis, but exactly where is it? Lateral or medial?

- Pulse/Continuous ultrasound
- Shockwave
- The Strap (if it's lateral epicondilitis)

REST. If something hurts, stop doing it.

It is the outside tendon, above the elbow joint. The one you'd use if you were doing a tricep extension of any kind.
 

j4ever

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Have you tried A.R.T.? I tried all kinds of crap, and A.R.T. was the only thing that solved my problem, and trust brotha, I had bad inner and outer elbow pain for a long time, if you have not tried it, find a good practitioner.

ART® Provider Location Search
 

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