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Choice of protien

SmallTownIron

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I may get talked to like an idiot but oh well :headbang:

I am sure I am not the only one who has been or is in a similar situation.

Situation
I currently purchase chicken and ground beef as the solid protiens in my diet. However, the price of extra lean beef has increased drastically and is taking a toll on my wallet. I could down grade to a fatter ground beef (87/13) but I believe this is too fatty.

However, chicken is still at a great price and pork loins/chops are cheap also.

Now would you downgrade in the quality of meat to pork?
Would you sacrafice the fat content and go with the higher fat ground beef?
Would you "double up" on chicken breast?

This is a question that I am curious as too what sort of choices you all make when faced with somethign like this.

Thank you in advance.
 

PHIL HERNON

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Joined
Jun 6, 2002
Messages
14,932
Well

I may get talked to like an idiot but oh well :headbang:

I am sure I am not the only one who has been or is in a similar situation.

Situation
I currently purchase chicken and ground beef as the solid protiens in my diet. However, the price of extra lean beef has increased drastically and is taking a toll on my wallet. I could down grade to a fatter ground beef (87/13) but I believe this is too fatty.

However, chicken is still at a great price and pork loins/chops are cheap also.

Now would you downgrade in the quality of meat to pork?
Would you sacrafice the fat content and go with the higher fat ground beef?
Would you "double up" on chicken breast?

This is a question that I am curious as too what sort of choices you all make when faced with somethign like this.

Thank you in advance.
This needs to be a sticky because I think everyone has this issue.........do I go 99/1......97/3?......80/20? 77/23?........96/4?.......88/22?..Is pork the "other" white meat? Does a chicken cross the road faster than a pig? Who is stronger emotionally a pog or a cow.........? Find out these answers, then divide it by the price per pound..........then divide that by the engagement 1 carat VVS ring.......then you will have your answer, but it may be different than mine.
 

SmallTownIron

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This needs to be a sticky because I think everyone has this issue.........do I go 99/1......97/3?......80/20? 77/23?........96/4?.......88/22?..Is pork the "other" white meat? Does a chicken cross the road faster than a pig? Who is stronger emotionally a pog or a cow.........? FInd out these answers, then divide it by th eprice per pound..........then divide that by the engagement 1 carat VVS ring.......then you will have your answer, but it may be different than mine.
pog? Is this a secret of yours?

lol great post Phil
 

Gunsmith

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dollar for dollar I thing eggs are hard to beat , use the super cheap eggs and eat the whites only then get some better free range eggs for the yolks.

Take up hunting !! I got a great deal on a good rilfe rightnow:p
 

PHIL HERNON

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Oh man

dollar for dollar I thing eggs are hard to beat , use the super cheap eggs and eat the whites only then get some better free range eggs for the yolks.

Take up hunting !! I got a great deal on a good rilfe rightnow:p
Dont be adding eggs and guns to the equation
 

tenny

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EGGS man.........EGGS!!!!!

.97 cents a doz wal-mart

:cool:
 

K-fed

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13.96 for 15 dozen at Sams:love:
That would last me about 9-10 days... Seriously. My significant other hates getting me eggs at grocery time. I need a more varied diet or something but they work so darn well!!
 

knucklehed

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smalltown check this:

Reducing the Fat Content of Regular Ground Beef by Draining and Rinsing




Ground Beef is sold according to it's fat content:
Ground Beef is available in many forms these days. The most common forms are Super Lean, Extra Lean, Lean, and Regular old humble Hamburger. Each type has a different percentage of fat added to it. Super Lean is the most expensive; it has the least amount of added fat. Regular ground beef is the most economical; it has the most amount of added fat. There are ways around this extra fat though, so that we can eat the cheapest ground beef, and still consume the least amount of fat possible. Click Here to skip down to the nuts and bolts of a procedure called Draining and Rinsing.

Super Lean: This type of ground beef usually has between 7% and 10% fat content. At 90% or 93% lean beef, it is the leanest ground beef you can buy. This also makes it the most expensive. In my area it is $4 to $5 lb at most supermarkets, although at a local Warehouse Store (Sam's) it is a more reasonable $1.88 lb. A 4-ounce portion of raw super-lean ground beef contains approximately 170 calories, 8g fat, 3g saturated fat and 61 mg cholesterol. Once cooked a pound of super-lean ground beef weighs about 12-2/3 ounces. Thus a 4 oz portion of raw super-lean turns into about a standard 3-ounce portion after it's cooked.

Extra Lean or Ground Round: Most cookbooks and magazines call for this type of ground beef in their recipes. It contains 15% fat and 85% lean beef. In my area it costs between $3 and $4.50 a pound. A pound of raw ground round becomes about 12-ounces when cooked.

Lean or Ground Chuck: This type of ground beef is 80% lean and 20% fat. Usually it is called Ground Chuck on the label. In my area it usually costs between $2.69 and $3.69 per pound. My local warehouse store has it for $1.78 lb, or a dime less than their leanest ground beef. A pound of raw lean ground beef weighs about 11-1/2 -ounces after it is cooked.

Regular or Humble Hamburger: This is the least expensive ground beef and it also has the highest percentage of added fat. Normally it is 70% lean and 30% fat. Sometimes it is advertised as 27% fat and 73% lean though, so check the label. It can still be found on sale for about 99¢ lb but those sales have become more rare with inflation. Even at it's highest price it usually costs no more than $2.69 lb. In my area it is available in 5-pound rolls for about $1.28 lb at our local Walmart. Walmart and Sam's may be taking over the world, but they offer so much savings that it's hard to resist.


If you cook a pound of raw hamburger, it will become about 10-2/3 ounces of cooked meat. This is merely 2-ounces less than the most expensive super-lean ground beef. Regular hamburger costs less than half as much as super-lean ground beef. I am not willing to pay double for 2 more ounces of meat. For frugal folks trying to keep the grocery bills as low as possible, Regular Hamburger is the best choice.

But what about the fat content? When you are trying to reduce the amount of fat and cholesterol in your diet, wouldn't Super Lean Beef be a better deal nutritionally? Well that depends. Regular Hamburger is higher in fat than Super Lean, however most people don't consume the fat that cooks out of their ground beef. Usually people drain it off. For Health & Budget conscious folks like us, there is an even more thorough way to reduce the fat in regular ground beef.

Drain & Rinse Regular Hamburger to eliminate as much fat as possible. Fry up a pound of regular, cheap Humble Hamburger in the normal way. Break it up into small pieces, and cook it until all the pink is gone. Drain as much of the accumulated fat as you can into a handy vegetable can, or grease catcher. Then dump the ground beef into a colander or strainer in the sink. Run hot tap water into the greasy skillet. Pour this water over the hamburger in the strainer. Do it again. Allow the beef to drain a few minutes, and then return it to the skillet. Proceed as directed by the recipe.

If you like, you can put a bowl or pot under the strainer to catch the water that drains off of the hamburger. This can be chilled until the fat solidifies on top, and then the remaining broth can be used anywhere beef broth is called for. It can also be frozen for later use. This way any nutrients that wash away with the water are still preserved; a very thrifty and conservative use of resources.

I usually don't add onions, garlic or other seasonings until after the hamburger is cooked, drained and rinsed. Some folks fry the onions or garlic along with the meat as they cook it. Do what you feel is best for your circumstances.

A 4-ounce raw portion of regular hamburger that has been cooked, drained and rinsed has approximately 155 calories, 9g fat, 4g saturated fat and 46 mg cholesterol. Compared to the values for super-lean ground beef above, drained and rinsed crumbles have 15 fewer calories, 1 more gram total fat, 1 more gram saturated fat and 15 fewer miligrams of cholesterol. Because of this information I am whole-heartedly willing to eat and recommend regular ground beef that has been cooked, drained and rinsed to anyone who is trying to eat a healthier diet.
 
Last edited:

PHIL HERNON

Banned
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
Messages
14,932
Good post

smalltown check this:

Reducing the Fat Content of Regular Ground Beef by Draining and Rinsing




Ground Beef is sold according to it's fat content:
Ground Beef is available in many forms these days. The most common forms are Super Lean, Extra Lean, Lean, and Regular old humble Hamburger. Each type has a different percentage of fat added to it. Super Lean is the most expensive; it has the least amount of added fat. Regular ground beef is the most economical; it has the most amount of added fat. There are ways around this extra fat though, so that we can eat the cheapest ground beef, and still consume the least amount of fat possible. Click Here to skip down to the nuts and bolts of a procedure called Draining and Rinsing.

Super Lean: This type of ground beef usually has between 7% and 10% fat content. At 90% or 93% lean beef, it is the leanest ground beef you can buy. This also makes it the most expensive. In my area it is $4 to $5 lb at most supermarkets, although at a local Warehouse Store (Sam's) it is a more reasonable $1.88 lb. A 4-ounce portion of raw super-lean ground beef contains approximately 170 calories, 8g fat, 3g saturated fat and 61 mg cholesterol. Once cooked a pound of super-lean ground beef weighs about 12-2/3 ounces. Thus a 4 oz portion of raw super-lean turns into about a standard 3-ounce portion after it's cooked.

Extra Lean or Ground Round: Most cookbooks and magazines call for this type of ground beef in their recipes. It contains 15% fat and 85% lean beef. In my area it costs between $3 and $4.50 a pound. A pound of raw ground round becomes about 12-ounces when cooked.

Lean or Ground Chuck: This type of ground beef is 80% lean and 20% fat. Usually it is called Ground Chuck on the label. In my area it usually costs between $2.69 and $3.69 per pound. My local warehouse store has it for $1.78 lb, or a dime less than their leanest ground beef. A pound of raw lean ground beef weighs about 11-1/2 -ounces after it is cooked.

Regular or Humble Hamburger: This is the least expensive ground beef and it also has the highest percentage of added fat. Normally it is 70% lean and 30% fat. Sometimes it is advertised as 27% fat and 73% lean though, so check the label. It can still be found on sale for about 99¢ lb but those sales have become more rare with inflation. Even at it's highest price it usually costs no more than $2.69 lb. In my area it is available in 5-pound rolls for about $1.28 lb at our local Walmart. Walmart and Sam's may be taking over the world, but they offer so much savings that it's hard to resist.


If you cook a pound of raw hamburger, it will become about 10-2/3 ounces of cooked meat. This is merely 2-ounces less than the most expensive super-lean ground beef. Regular hamburger costs less than half as much as super-lean ground beef. I am not willing to pay double for 2 more ounces of meat. For frugal folks trying to keep the grocery bills as low as possible, Regular Hamburger is the best choice.

But what about the fat content? When you are trying to reduce the amount of fat and cholesterol in your diet, wouldn't Super Lean Beef be a better deal nutritionally? Well that depends. Regular Hamburger is higher in fat than Super Lean, however most people don't consume the fat that cooks out of their ground beef. Usually people drain it off. For Health & Budget conscious folks like us, there is an even more thorough way to reduce the fat in regular ground beef.

Drain & Rinse Regular Hamburger to eliminate as much fat as possible. Fry up a pound of regular, cheap Humble Hamburger in the normal way. Break it up into small pieces, and cook it until all the pink is gone. Drain as much of the accumulated fat as you can into a handy vegetable can, or grease catcher. Then dump the ground beef into a colander or strainer in the sink. Run hot tap water into the greasy skillet. Pour this water over the hamburger in the strainer. Do it again. Allow the beef to drain a few minutes, and then return it to the skillet. Proceed as directed by the recipe.

If you like, you can put a bowl or pot under the strainer to catch the water that drains off of the hamburger. This can be chilled until the fat solidifies on top, and then the remaining broth can be used anywhere beef broth is called for. It can also be frozen for later use. This way any nutrients that wash away with the water are still preserved; a very thrifty and conservative use of resources.

I usually don't add onions, garlic or other seasonings until after the hamburger is cooked, drained and rinsed. Some folks fry the onions or garlic along with the meat as they cook it. Do what you feel is best for your circumstances.

A 4-ounce raw portion of regular hamburger that has been cooked, drained and rinsed has approximately 155 calories, 9g fat, 4g saturated fat and 46 mg cholesterol. Compared to the values for super-lean ground beef above, drained and rinsed crumbles have 15 fewer calories, 1 more gram total fat, 1 more gram saturated fat and 15 fewer miligrams of cholesterol. Because of this information I am whole-heartedly willing to eat and recommend regular ground beef that has been cooked, drained and rinsed to anyone who is trying to eat a healthier diet.
I do this but if its grass fed beef you want the fats..........if I cant get grass fed beef I drain it as above but add back into the meat coconut oil or olive oil and finish cooking.
 

BigChef

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smalltown check this:

Reducing the Fat Content of Regular Ground Beef by Draining and Rinsing




Ground Beef is sold according to it's fat content:
Ground Beef is available in many forms these days. The most common forms are Super Lean, Extra Lean, Lean, and Regular old humble Hamburger. Each type has a different percentage of fat added to it. Super Lean is the most expensive; it has the least amount of added fat. Regular ground beef is the most economical; it has the most amount of added fat. There are ways around this extra fat though, so that we can eat the cheapest ground beef, and still consume the least amount of fat possible. Click Here to skip down to the nuts and bolts of a procedure called Draining and Rinsing.

Super Lean: This type of ground beef usually has between 7% and 10% fat content. At 90% or 93% lean beef, it is the leanest ground beef you can buy. This also makes it the most expensive. In my area it is $4 to $5 lb at most supermarkets, although at a local Warehouse Store (Sam's) it is a more reasonable $1.88 lb. A 4-ounce portion of raw super-lean ground beef contains approximately 170 calories, 8g fat, 3g saturated fat and 61 mg cholesterol. Once cooked a pound of super-lean ground beef weighs about 12-2/3 ounces. Thus a 4 oz portion of raw super-lean turns into about a standard 3-ounce portion after it's cooked.

Extra Lean or Ground Round: Most cookbooks and magazines call for this type of ground beef in their recipes. It contains 15% fat and 85% lean beef. In my area it costs between $3 and $4.50 a pound. A pound of raw ground round becomes about 12-ounces when cooked.

Lean or Ground Chuck: This type of ground beef is 80% lean and 20% fat. Usually it is called Ground Chuck on the label. In my area it usually costs between $2.69 and $3.69 per pound. My local warehouse store has it for $1.78 lb, or a dime less than their leanest ground beef. A pound of raw lean ground beef weighs about 11-1/2 -ounces after it is cooked.

Regular or Humble Hamburger: This is the least expensive ground beef and it also has the highest percentage of added fat. Normally it is 70% lean and 30% fat. Sometimes it is advertised as 27% fat and 73% lean though, so check the label. It can still be found on sale for about 99¢ lb but those sales have become more rare with inflation. Even at it's highest price it usually costs no more than $2.69 lb. In my area it is available in 5-pound rolls for about $1.28 lb at our local Walmart. Walmart and Sam's may be taking over the world, but they offer so much savings that it's hard to resist.


If you cook a pound of raw hamburger, it will become about 10-2/3 ounces of cooked meat. This is merely 2-ounces less than the most expensive super-lean ground beef. Regular hamburger costs less than half as much as super-lean ground beef. I am not willing to pay double for 2 more ounces of meat. For frugal folks trying to keep the grocery bills as low as possible, Regular Hamburger is the best choice.

But what about the fat content? When you are trying to reduce the amount of fat and cholesterol in your diet, wouldn't Super Lean Beef be a better deal nutritionally? Well that depends. Regular Hamburger is higher in fat than Super Lean, however most people don't consume the fat that cooks out of their ground beef. Usually people drain it off. For Health & Budget conscious folks like us, there is an even more thorough way to reduce the fat in regular ground beef.

Drain & Rinse Regular Hamburger to eliminate as much fat as possible. Fry up a pound of regular, cheap Humble Hamburger in the normal way. Break it up into small pieces, and cook it until all the pink is gone. Drain as much of the accumulated fat as you can into a handy vegetable can, or grease catcher. Then dump the ground beef into a colander or strainer in the sink. Run hot tap water into the greasy skillet. Pour this water over the hamburger in the strainer. Do it again. Allow the beef to drain a few minutes, and then return it to the skillet. Proceed as directed by the recipe.

If you like, you can put a bowl or pot under the strainer to catch the water that drains off of the hamburger. This can be chilled until the fat solidifies on top, and then the remaining broth can be used anywhere beef broth is called for. It can also be frozen for later use. This way any nutrients that wash away with the water are still preserved; a very thrifty and conservative use of resources.

I usually don't add onions, garlic or other seasonings until after the hamburger is cooked, drained and rinsed. Some folks fry the onions or garlic along with the meat as they cook it. Do what you feel is best for your circumstances.

A 4-ounce raw portion of regular hamburger that has been cooked, drained and rinsed has approximately 155 calories, 9g fat, 4g saturated fat and 46 mg cholesterol. Compared to the values for super-lean ground beef above, drained and rinsed crumbles have 15 fewer calories, 1 more gram total fat, 1 more gram saturated fat and 15 fewer miligrams of cholesterol. Because of this information I am whole-heartedly willing to eat and recommend regular ground beef that has been cooked, drained and rinsed to anyone who is trying to eat a healthier diet.
Good post also. I also like to suggest Lean Pork Tenderloin. Pork is often shunned by diet purists, and what a shame. Not only is it more flavourful than chicken, but some cuts are almost as low in fat while still boasting the requisite protein power. Pork tenderloin is the filet mignon of pork — it’s the most tender, as well as the leanest portion, of the meat.

I also buy Lean Turkey Mince which is not that expensive. I normally buy Beef striploin and trim the fat off myself. Buy whole meats and cut it up in portion control and trim the fat off, that way it's cheaper than buying portion meats. Also Fish is great source of Protein and not that expensive.
If you feel you cant afford it with Protein, try having a couple of Protein shakes during the day and some meats. Just a thought!
 

emeric delczeg

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I do this but if its grass fed beef you want the fats..........if I cant get grass fed beef I drain it as above but add back into the meat coconut oil or olive oil and finish cooking.
How about gras smoking beef meat.
 

MonkeyBoy

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I buy all my meat at Costco. Love there meat!!!

( but I work for them to so I am biased )
 

jeffchance

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i get all of my protein from costco as well, thats why i don't eat much beef. they don't sell grass fed. eggs, boneless skinless chicken breast, cottage cheese, tilapia, and tuna.
 

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