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CNS and Training to Failure

trenseter

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Feb 3, 2010
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i totaly agree, last year i got over trained doin forced reps every week until i finaly got a pinched nerve.lost almost all strength in my left arm & all my joints hurt.i was training 5 days a week as hard as i could until injury then had to take a month off and i still was not 100%!now i train 3 days a week & never felt better!:D
 

Drift Wood

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Dec 2, 2009
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For the purpose of this article we will assume that 'failure' is the point of momentary concentric failure - the inability to fully complete another concentric contraction.

Well, by training to failure each time you train you are going set your nerve cells into a constant state of inhibition leading you to tax the CNS far to much through the increased out put of electrical impulses. This will lead to rapid overtraining. That leads to time off and bodily and mental states lacking motivation, appetite, etc. It also means that it is not always muscular failure which is occurring; more CNS failure, which means that your muscles are not being worked anyway so stimuli for growth is not being achieved every time you train.

So, in conclusion to all this, muscular failure, be it concentric, eccentric or isometric, is not necessary to provide a growth stimulus.


The above was cut/pasted from the linked article.

So my understanding of what I read is that I should not always train to failure... Let's say I'm doing DB presses... At 90% of my 1RM (one rep max) I should be able to get about 5 reps and then I'm done... muscle failure... doing additional reps would be forced where I would mostly be focusing on the negative. So is the article implying that I should stop before 5 reps to avoid muscle failure... thus not totally taxing my CNS???

Could someone please help...
My struggle with understanding this is an excellent example of how advanced academic education is not always useful... at least for me...
 

max_rep

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Nov 22, 2007
Messages
68
I aggree

I think you are right here.I saw that Ronnie 90% does not get help from people in the gym on his DVD's.He works for concentric failure

For the purpose of this article we will assume that 'failure' is the point of momentary concentric failure - the inability to fully complete another concentric contraction.

Well, by training to failure each time you train you are going set your nerve cells into a constant state of inhibition leading you to tax the CNS far to much through the increased out put of electrical impulses. This will lead to rapid overtraining. That leads to time off and bodily and mental states lacking motivation, appetite, etc. It also means that it is not always muscular failure which is occurring; more CNS failure, which means that your muscles are not being worked anyway so stimuli for growth is not being achieved every time you train.

So, in conclusion to all this, muscular failure, be it concentric, eccentric or isometric, is not necessary to provide a growth stimulus.




The above was cut/pasted from the linked article.

So my understanding of what I read is that I should not always train to failure... Let's say I'm doing DB presses... At 90% of my 1RM (one rep max) I should be able to get about 5 reps and then I'm done... muscle failure... doing additional reps would be forced where I would mostly be focusing on the negative. So is the article implying that I should stop before 5 reps to avoid muscle failure... thus not totally taxing my CNS???

Could someone please help...
My struggle with understanding this is an excellent example of how advanced academic education is not always useful... at least for me...
 

Cosmicdrifter

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Apr 15, 2010
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I've tried to ferret out the best routine since 1970, when I first started reviewing studies performed by physiologist and kinesiologist. If you review all the boards and all the training regimens, you get dizzy. 1 set, 4 sets, drop-sets?

We know that taking test alone without doing any resistance work will increase muscle mass. So we can assume that any level of resistance training will increase the amount of mass the testosterone facilitates.

Another fact we can all agree on is that intermittently changing the weight, reps, sets, and exercises - mixing it up a bit - has a beneficial effect.

So the mantras seem to be - "Don't over-train," (you tear down faster than your protein synthesis can rebuild), "Don't get injured," "Don't overtax your CNS," (another outcome that sets you back), and do at least 1 or 2 sets to about 1 rep short of complete failure.

And, all of this will be influenced by your age, diet, rest, and the amount of gear you are taking. If you look at the physiques of bodybuilders over the last 30 years - yes they have gotten bigger; I think that can be attributed to the development of new supplemental techniques more than training.

Arnold looked good 30 years ago. I met him in Hollywood and he was huge. So, have training techniques advanced appreciably since then? We know there are many more approaches - some very complex. The pros are bigger, but 90% of the people on this board are not pros, they just want to make steady progress.

Trying to find the "best" approach is a zero sum game. It is a moving target. We do know that you have to show up, train hard but not over-train, eat right, and take the right stuff.
 
Last edited:

Jax11

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Sep 28, 2010
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alot of good info, I find I overtrain alot, thanks for the good info
 

Pharm_Fed

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Link isn't working for me. Can someone copy and paste?
 

NotaDoctor

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Dec 6, 2009
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Not the first time most of us have heard this, but seems easy to forget..

Missed out on alot of growth with over training when I was younger...

Thanks for the reminder ... :)
 

showstopper83

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Nov 28, 2013
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I've always made my biggest strides in strength and mass by training to failure... guess everyone is a bit different.
 

SugarFree

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Is it a point of not training to failure or getting enough rest before working the muscle again?
 

ShortStop

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I think were probably all guilty of over training at some point
 

BEASTZ6

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Nov 25, 2007
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Great article. It is just as important to allow recovery time for your CNS as it is for your muscles.
 

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