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Reverse Hypers

socialdfan

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Donnie Thompsons lower back protocol and lots of pull downs for distraction/traction, his duck and back walks, stretch and train that psoas and QL, do hypers-I don't side with Duffins hyper statements, work the hams daily-lots of banded curls, obviously core work. I trust heavily in Donnie, Clint Darden, Dave Tate, Dr John Rusin and a few others. Just my two cents.
 

Ds3317

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The problem with directly strengthening your lower back (or maybe better, the exercises that do just that) is that it's always going to compress your spine to some degree which can again pose new issues in the long run. I've had 4 back surgeries already, often have tightness etc. and I was told by my orthopaedic surgeon to avoid anything that compresses my spine and to especially train abs hard every day. I know that if I use one of those lower back machines for instance (even for high reps), my back doesn't feel good afterwards. Vice versa, even if it's very tight that day, after one good hard set of weighted crunches, it feels a lot better. I see you're already using an inversion table as do I on a daily basis. Medical science thinks they are BS and possibly even damaging but that's one thing I'm not going to listen to my ortho about.

Just my 2 cents as a fellow back-pain sufferer.
I have bulging discs and Epidural lipomatosis and reverse hypers or anything that targets the lower back destroys me. I do the same as you with training abs heavy every gym session. Sucks not being able to train lower back at all though.
 

jeroendebleser

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My inversion table has helped me tremendously. I use it after I exercise at the gym, each day. My chiropractor thinks it is a good idea too. When I go to see him he uses the decompression table on me, where there is a motor that basically pulls you apart. Right after I finish doing the stretching out my back does hurt a bit but after about 5 minutes I feel great.
Yep, I also frequent a chiro. Again something that medical science thinks is quackery but it feels so good afterwards... I'm going to ask him to use the decompression table next time as well.
 

jeroendebleser

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I have bulging discs and Epidural lipomatosis and reverse hypers or anything that targets the lower back destroys me. I do the same as you with training abs heavy every gym session. Sucks not being able to train lower back at all though.
Yep... If it hurts, just don't do it even if someone else says it 'should help you'. How you feel when doing it should be the only gauge really.
 

maldorf

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Yep, I also frequent a chiro. Again something that medical science thinks is quackery but it feels so good afterwards... I'm going to ask him to use the decompression table next time as well.
Mine started me out on the electrostim, guess because it is more gentle. We progressed to the table and that helps so much more. You will like it. They can gradually increase the pounds of pull you get too, and duration. I think im on mine for about 15 minutes. I hang on my table for just 5 minutes because all the blood flow to the head can be hard on your eyes they say. I think it also puts a strain on my weak heart. Just be careful when you get up off the table. Get up slowly and move slowly. If you get up and move real fast you might pull a muscle or "throw out your back". Give it time to settle down some.
 

maldorf

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dupe post
 

buck

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When I was looking into inversion tables a couple years ago I could only find one study. And it showed that people with herniated discs had more pain after using the tables for a while then thy did before using the table. But there could have been many factors for that, but I passed as I have a number of herniated disc and decided not to risk it. Went to a chiropractor who had been a top level triathlete as it seemed a good choice and was recommended. Most of my back felt better as time went by except the lumbar region which got worse so I stopped and then the lumbar region felt better. Trying to shove an arch where there hasn't been one is not the best thing all the time it seems.
 

lookslikesausage

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My inversion table has helped me tremendously. I use it after I exercise at the gym, each day. My chiropractor thinks it is a good idea too. When I go to see him he uses the decompression table on me, where there is a motor that basically pulls you apart. Right after I finish doing the stretching out my back does hurt a bit but after about 5 minutes I feel great.
do you find the decompression that your chiro uses on you is helpful? i too have found that bent over rows are the worst offender of my lower back pain. i have bulging and herniated discs as well as stenosis in the lower back (l3 all the way down to s1). I've had to give up barbell squats and deadlifts which i trained for many years.
 

maldorf

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do you find the decompression that your chiro uses on you is helpful? i too have found that bent over rows are the worst offender of my lower back pain. i have bulging and herniated discs as well as stenosis in the lower back (l3 all the way down to s1). I've had to give up barbell squats and deadlifts which i trained for many years.
My low back isn't injured like yours, so treatment could be different. I've never seen anyone but the chiropractor, but he did do an xray and said he didn't see anything major.

The decompression table is better than just using my inversion table because the force is concentrated all in the lumbar region mostly and the treatment lasts longer, about 15 minutes long. The effect is more powerful for sure. If your doctor and or chiro thinks it is safe for you then I'd try it.
 

alfresco

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Who here can add some insight or tweeks to my plan? Any experience with the reverse hyper?
I do reverse hypers regularly but do not have access to a reverse hyper bench (wish I did). I do them statically,
on a tall bench and hold a dumbbell between my ankles and lift until parallel with my body. 30 seconds. Then
I quickly do a set, again legs parallel with my body, but this time I spread my legs and spread and hold, spread
and hold my legs for 20 reps. And my back feel great.

If you have not watched this video, I think it is a good one. But the swinging movement, the momentum makes
me scratch my head :eek:


Mike Francois cohosts a podcast. He did reverse hypers. I think he may have been recovering from a back
injury. It was when he trained at Westside Gym with Louie Simmons. Sorry I don’t know which podcast
it was but listening to them all as I have done was educational and fun. Mike Francois is great guy, very
humble.

https://oldskoolmuscle.libsyn.com/
 

qbkilla

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ive read, and been told by a PT who examined me, that hamstrings are typically too loose, not too tight. so we should actually not stretch them this makes things worse. they said stretch the quads they are usually too tight but not the hamstrings. anyone ever hear this before?
 

upeccmi

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I do reverse hypers 2X per week to try to help my spinal stenosis/strengthen my lower back, I find it helps, I use very little weight and high reps.
I saw a video on line about a big time power lifter who had severe spinal issues and worked with big time weight on reverse hypers to the point his doctor later told him he did not need surgery any longer. Google it, I am sure its still out there.
 

Rogue

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Seen many times and often neglected is lower back discomfort (pain, mobility, etc...) tied into the posterior end of things...That would include hamstrings, the gluteus maximus, erector spinae muscle group, trapezius, and posterior deltoids. Any minor disruption along that whole group can cause pain, discomfort and limitations. Being that a complex network of nerves governs the muscles, the ailment often appear elsewhere.
As athletes, the whole chain is vulnerable... mobility and stretching is important, not jut to feel good but also to GROW.
Often overlooked is the bottle neck root of MANY of these problems not just as athletes but as people in general.
The sciatic nerve (biggest in the human body about 3/4" 19mm around ) feeds a complex network or nerves that start from your toes, back the leg, glute , into the lower back feeding the spine , up through the neck all the way to your eyes...
Any obstruction along that hwy. will cause direct and indirect discomfort.
One KEY place that needs attention and is affected due to our lifestyles and training is the PERIFORMIS muscle.
Since it is affected by everything fron sitting in a chair to squatting, paying attention to the area can solve MANY if not most the aches we get as Athletes especially as we age will have an issue there. That muscle which rotates turning the leg and foot outward runs diagonally from the lower spine to the upper surface of the femur, with the sciatic nerve running underneath or through the muscle.
It is any interference with that nerve that causes often misdiagnosed aches and pains. Moreover its is hard to address, requiring specialized mobility work often uncomfortable and tedious. However, a healthy Periformis/Sciatic can REALLY unlock your potential for strength and growth. Folks, please pay attention to it, its a sneaky one that influences most functions in our body( All the nervous network is tied in even the brain...)
 

Attachments

Biggerp73

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I messed up my lower back two years ago doing heavy deadlifts and I haven't been able to do anything involving the lower back since. Hyper extensions with any amount of weight will automatically aggravate it. My back workouts are definitely impeded by it. Sucks. Tried doing the McGill method and it helped alleviate the everyday pain and soreness but didn't get me to a point where I could actually use weights again.
 

lookslikesausage

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I messed up my lower back two years ago doing heavy deadlifts and I haven't been able to do anything involving the lower back since. Hyper extensions with any amount of weight will automatically aggravate it. My back workouts are definitely impeded by it. Sucks. Tried doing the McGill method and it helped alleviate the everyday pain and soreness but didn't get me to a point where I could actually use weights again.
i'm sort of in the same boat. the closest i've gotten to squatting and deadlifting without being a total mess (we're talking pain from just walking) is Goblet Squats for high reps with a heavy dumbbell and Kettlebell DLs from blocks (can't bend at the waist too far w/load without paying for it). Problem is that KB DL is not the same as regular DL and KB aren't going to thicken your back and traps much.
 

neuropump85

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A little history..............I competed in powerlifting many years ago and had competition squats in the mid 800's and deadlift PR of 705 at 220. During that time the only injury type issues were shoulder and elbow stuff, nothing surgery causing, and a partially torn quad from being stupid making weight and being dehydrated at a meet.
Fast forward to about six years ago when I hurt my lower back picking up a piece of paper from the floor, stuck on the floor for 45 minutes before someone heard me, off the ER, no structural damage, two doses of morphine and a bunch of muscle relaxants and I was back 100% in about 3-4 days. Four years ago I woke up with massive spasms, chiro trips and I was back to normal in about a week. Four months ago I was down for four days of being unable to stand for more than a few minutes, and am still dealing with the tightness. I started using an inversion table every day which has helped but only by alleviating the tightness, I've realized I need to not get tight and sore in the first place as I'm not ready to have this be my new reality. I need to progressively strengthen my lower back. I already work abs regularly and stretch religiously.

With all that as the history, now for what I'm looking for. I purchased a reverse hyper bench a week ago. I start EVERY workout with a light, controlled set of 15-20 reps to warm up and stretch my back. On back workout days I end with three sets of 12 reps and plan on slowly progressing on those three sets. I then end every workout with the inversion table.

Who here can add some insight or tweeks to my plan? Any experience with the reverse hyper?
Back rehab starts with activation of the deep spinal musculature, the multifidi and intertransversarii. They respond very well to isometric exercises, specifically, co-contraction of the abs and gluteus.... picture yourself lying in bed and squeezing your glutes and gently contracting your abdominals without moving.
If this goes well for two weeks it means these STATIC stabilizers are getting stronger, and this is an essential first step.
Then, and only then, begin isokinetics (exercises with movements). Doing these with a five second negative and five second positive contraction for 6-8 res will give you at least a full minute of time under tension, and continue to activate the static stabilizers, and also bring in the prime movers to contribute neurologically. Then, add heavier loaded exercises, deadlifts, squats, etc as tolerated, but keep up this basic ritual of training as a part of your warm up.
I works extremely well with my patients, and they get better and stay better. Be smart and train for life!
 

Rogue

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Back rehab starts with activation of the deep spinal musculature, the multifidi and intertransversarii. They respond very well to isometric exercises, specifically, co-contraction of the abs and gluteus.... picture yourself lying in bed and squeezing your glutes and gently contracting your abdominals without moving.
If this goes well for two weeks it means these STATIC stabilizers are getting stronger, and this is an essential first step.
Then, and only then, begin isokinetics (exercises with movements). Doing these with a five second negative and five second positive contraction for 6-8 res will give you at least a full minute of time under tension, and continue to activate the static stabilizers, and also bring in the prime movers to contribute neurologically. Then, add heavier loaded exercises, deadlifts, squats, etc as tolerated, but keep up this basic ritual of training as a part of your warm up.
I works extremely well with my patients, and they get better and stay better. Be smart and train for life!
This is jewelry! bulls eye.
On Youtube there is an interesting fella who talks about neglect of this area as NEURO-85 was saying for rehabbing your spine (backpain).
He does it full time with short vids.
If anyone is looking at ways to address these issues, give Trevor Bachmeyer | SmashweRx a view.
I am in no way affiliated with him, but have watched many of his pods...
There are many, some are updated versions of one he has already done.


 

Rogue

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I linked the wrong video... cause thats the one I was watching
but there are many addressing the specific subject matter of
concern:rolleyes:
 

Dens228

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Back rehab starts with activation of the deep spinal musculature, the multifidi and intertransversarii. They respond very well to isometric exercises, specifically, co-contraction of the abs and gluteus.... picture yourself lying in bed and squeezing your glutes and gently contracting your abdominals without moving.
If this goes well for two weeks it means these STATIC stabilizers are getting stronger, and this is an essential first step.
Then, and only then, begin isokinetics (exercises with movements). Doing these with a five second negative and five second positive contraction for 6-8 res will give you at least a full minute of time under tension, and continue to activate the static stabilizers, and also bring in the prime movers to contribute neurologically. Then, add heavier loaded exercises, deadlifts, squats, etc as tolerated, but keep up this basic ritual of training as a part of your warm up.
I works extremely well with my patients, and they get better and stay better. Be smart and train for life!
My back is much better, almost 100% but I'm going to give your recommendation a go....thanks!
 

Rogue

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Here is a good one...

 

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