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Scientific Study On Why Legs Lose Muscle As We Age

danieltx

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Muscle loss in old age linked to fewer nerve signals - BBC News

Muscle loss in old age linked to fewer nerve signals

Researchers say they may have worked out why there is a natural loss of muscle in the legs as people age - and that it is due to a loss of nerves.

In tests on 168 men, they found that nerves controlling the legs decreased by around 30% by the age of 75.

This made muscles waste away, but in older fitter athletes there was a better chance of them being 'rescued' by nerves re-connecting.

The scientists published their research in the Journal of Physiology.

As people get older, their leg muscles become smaller and weaker, leading to problems with everyday movements such as walking up stairs or getting out of a chair.

It is something that affects everyone eventually, but why it happens is not fully understood.

Prof Jamie McPhee, from Manchester Metropolitan University, said young adults usually had 60-70,000 nerves controlling movement in the legs from the lumbar spine.

But his research showed this changed significantly in old age.

"There was a dramatic loss of nerves controlling the muscles - a 30-60% loss - which means they waste away," he said.

"The muscles need to receive a proper signal from the nervous system to tell them to contract, so we can move around."

The research team from Manchester Metropolitan University worked with researchers from the University of Waterloo, Ontario, and the University of Manchester.

They looked at muscle tissue in detail using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and they recorded the electrical activity passing through the muscle to estimate the numbers and the size of surviving nerves.

The good news is that healthy muscles have a form of protection: surviving nerves can send out new branches to rescue muscles and stop them wasting away.

This is more likely to happen in fit people with large, healthy muscles, Prof McPhee said.

Although it is not known why connections between muscles and nerves break down with age, finding out more about muscle loss could help scientists find ways of reversing the condition in the future.
 

Dens228

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Well at least I have 21 more years until my leg nerves decrease by 30%,,,,,,,,
 

nothuman

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High protein intake has been shown to minimize muscle atrophy with age (to no one's surprise here)
 

thethinker48

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Anybody ever notice older lifters with nerve issues in their spine have atrophied forearms (some pros get this too); back, and chest might hold the same amount of size, but forearms and arms start to shrink.
 

bieberhole69

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Anybody ever notice older lifters with nerve issues in their spine have atrophied forearms (some pros get this too); back, and chest might hold the same amount of size, but forearms and arms start to shrink.

I always thought it was because they don't beat off anymore :confused:
 

danieltx

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Emeric recently posted that the key to maintaining leg size at 40+ is increasing training frequency - he trains legs 4 times per week. It makes sense that training them more often would keep nerve connections stronger.
 

emeric delczeg

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High protein intake has been shown to minimize muscle atrophy with age (to no one's surprise here)

Just protein is not enough.

This is from the study: The muscles need to receive a proper signal from the nervous system to tell them to contract, so we can move around."

My answer, the signal comes from one of FGF family members (we have 23 FGFs), when we get older our FGFs start to regenerate at a lower rate, also you need to increase the reflex pathway and duration of the muscle contraction.

BY incorporating some supplement that prolongs the action of acetylcholine on postsynaptic membranes and its accumulation in the synaptic gap, thereby will be a increase of intensity and duration of nerve impulse transmission to muscle tissues, which will be increse strength and duration of muscle contraction.

It will be no proper signaling with out FGFs.

I recommend to all of you to go and do research on all 23 FGF.
 

emeric delczeg

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Emeric recently posted that the key to maintaining leg size at 40+ is increasing training frequency - he trains legs 4 times per week. It makes sense that training them more often would keep nerve connections stronger.


Yes, my friend, my legs were the biggest at age 50. I am 66 and my legs is my best body part, 26 1/2 inch, not fat.
 

emeric delczeg

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Just protein is not enough.

This is from the study: The muscles need to receive a proper signal from the nervous system to tell them to contract, so we can move around."

My answer, the signal comes from one of FGF family members (we have 23 FGFs), when we get older our FGFs start to regenerate at a lower rate, also you need to increase the reflex pathway and duration of the muscle contraction.

BY incorporating some supplement that prolongs the action of acetylcholine on postsynaptic membranes and its accumulation in the synaptic gap, thereby will be a increase of intensity and duration of nerve impulse transmission to muscle tissues, which will be increse strength and duration of muscle contraction.

It will be no proper signaling with out FGFs.

I recommend to all of you to go and do research on all 23 FGF.

Acetylcholine has functions both in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and in the central nervous system (CNS) as a neuromodulator. In the peripheral nervous system, acetylcholardiac muscle fibers.ine activates muscles and is a major neurotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system. In the central nervous system, acetylcholine and its associated neurons form the cholinergic system.

You my wounder, why supplement companies not incorporating in the pre workout supplement a compound that would prolongs the action of acetylcholine ? Is available in a drug form and natural form.
 

pickapeck

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jp4355

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This Research makes sense to me and it hits home.

I've had Nerve Damage in my Lower Spine since the 80's, that has effected the Feeling in my Legs and Feet (Radiculopathy of the Spine).
Then I was Diagnosed with Degenerative Hip Disease in both Hips, so I was no longer able to Train Legs as I previously did.
I watched my Legs go from 28 1/2" cold, to around 23", in 10 years.
Finally, Surgical Procedures and Hip Replacement Implants evolved enough, that I had both Hips replaced.
1st Hip Surgery was in March 2016, and the Second was in January of 2017.

I've finally been able to get my Legs to start growing again.
And I'm just shy of 27 1/2" cold now..................... JP
P.S.
Though my back has felt left out with all the attention to the hips and has given me some intermittent problems.
I'm finally back full time now, and starting to ramp things up.

Just turned 65 in February of this year.
 
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emeric delczeg

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This Research makes sense to me and it hits home.

I've had Nerve Damage in my Lower Spine since the 80's, that has effected the Feeling in my Legs and Feet (Radiculopathy of the Spine).
Then I was Diagnosed with Degenerative Hip Disease in both Hips, so I was no longer able to Train Legs as I previously did.
I watched my Legs go from 28 1/2" cold, to around 23", in 10 years.
Finally, Surgical Procedures and Hip Replacement Implants evolved enough, that I had both Hips replaced.
1st Hip Surgery was in March 2016, and the Second was in January of 2017.

I've finally been able to get my Legs to start growing again.
And I'm just shy of 27 1/2" cold now..................... JP
P.S.
Though my back has felt left out with all the attention to the hips and has given me some intermittent problems.
I'm finally back full time now, and starting to ramp things up.

Just turned 65 in February of this year.

Fantastic.
 

j4ever

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This Research makes sense to me and it hits home.

I've had Nerve Damage in my Lower Spine since the 80's, that has effected the Feeling in my Legs and Feet (Radiculopathy of the Spine).
Then I was Diagnosed with Degenerative Hip Disease in both Hips, so I was no longer able to Train Legs as I previously did.
I watched my Legs go from 28 1/2" cold, to around 23", in 10 years.
Finally, Surgical Procedures and Hip Replacement Implants evolved enough, that I had both Hips replaced.
1st Hip Surgery was in March 2016, and the Second was in January of 2017.

I've finally been able to get my Legs to start growing again.
And I'm just shy of 27 1/2" cold now..................... JP
P.S.
Though my back has felt left out with all the attention to the hips and has given me some intermittent problems.
I'm finally back full time now, and starting to ramp things up.

Just turned 65 in February of this year.

what kind of hip replacements did you get?
 

OutToLunch

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Emeric, you mentioned that older trainees should train legs 3x week to preserve muscle mass?
 

6iron

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Being 50 years of age I guess my routine is changing today.
 

Crom

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Minimum 3 times, 4 times is even better.

I agree that frequency is important and specially for naturals or guys on trt you will get better results training a body part more than once per week, especially if you are a newbie. I have however not seen any studies that conclusively say that more then twice per week is better. Training a body part twice per week resulted in almost twice the progress then once pr week but three times per week was not significantly better then twice for experienced lifters.

It also depends on intensity. For example I split my body in two and lift mostly power lifting style with bench, deads and squats as staples in my workouts. I can handle training the body through twice per week and stay on this program without injuries but if I crank it up to three times per week it will be too much. Training intensity also dictates the frequency.
 

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