• All new members please introduce your self here and welcome to the board:
    http://www.professionalmuscle.com/forums/showthread.php?t=259
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
M4B Store Banner
SPC-210x65
Riptropin Store banner
Generation X Bodybuilding Forum
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Mysupps Store Banner
IP Gear Store Banner
Anabolic Hormones Store Banner
Ganabol Store Banner
Spend $100 and get bonus needles free at sterile syringes
Professional Muscle Store open now
LandmarkChem Email Banner
Medtech Store Banner
Bruce Labs Store banner
gd
Professional Muscle Store open now
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store

So, Who Logbooks and Who Doesn't?

USMuscle9403

Well-known member
Registered
Joined
Dec 24, 2004
Messages
1,893
I admit I've been really lax about this until I watched this video with Mike Israetel and Jordan Peters. We all know the importance of keeping one, but how many of us do it consistently? Ever since I've been back at it, they're correct...it's intimidating as all fuck lol You look at your previous weight and you're like, "goddamn I did that last time now I gotta somehow use MORE overload this time?!"


Mike tripped me out with his little schpiele.

"fuck this, I don't feel like doing this shit at all, I don't wanna squat all that weight!...you mean I gotta do 460 for 10 now? I FEEL like doing 315, fuck this!"

I like how I can barely write after a set lol

5493.jpeg
 

Flex500

Active member
Registered
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
647
I've gotten to the point I've soured on a logbook and I think it's mostly due to my job, schedule and lifestyle. I don't have it in my to lift that heavy and that extreme very often. Of course, a logbook doesn't require you to lift heavy but at 38 years old there are days where I can and do want to go heavy...so I take advantage of it and I go heavy. However, there are plenty of times where it isn't happening so like last week on a lower body day I did 5 sets of 10 with a challenging weight on squats.

I guess my point is my logbook will have different things in it all the time so it starts to feel borderline useless. The day I tossed the logbook was the day most of my injuries went away and I think it's because with my high level of stress I need much more flexibility in what a training day looks like.

I'm also not anti logbook at all. We chart and log things all the time for younger folks I work with.
 

F350

Active member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
125
I didnt log book for a long time. my progression was medicore. I started about 2-3 mo ago. the results i have put on in 3 mo are more than the past 2 years probably. Granted I was dieting for a show and Im on a lean rebound but Im surpassing all my strengths weekly, growing, and staying lean. Im kicking myself for not doing it years ago.
 

Bleed

Well-known member
Kilo Klub Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2010
Messages
1,437
For contest preparation I think it's vital. For me, it's not hard to remember what I did yesterday, last week, two months ago when it comes to training but I'm not hopping on stage.

In contest prep with the stress and all the other variables like memory issues, log book is the way to go.
 

Dens228

Verified Customer / Kilo Klub
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,296
I've logged my workouts for the last 30 years or so.....a holdover from my powerlifting days and just became a habit.
 

GaJoe

IFBB PRO
IFBB PROS
Joined
Oct 8, 2008
Messages
270
I think it's a super valuable tool. I think it's very easy to get complacent in training. I learned it from an old Pro years ago when I watched him log everything. I also think it goes beyond the gym and into the kitchen as well. If we are to be progressive it probably means in the diet as well. I try to keep pushing more food along with more weight. I think if you start logging you'd be surprised at how much more you do in a short amount of time...and then the process slows.
 

USMuscle9403

Well-known member
Registered
Joined
Dec 24, 2004
Messages
1,893
I've gotten to the point I've soured on a logbook and I think it's mostly due to my job, schedule and lifestyle. I don't have it in my to lift that heavy and that extreme very often. Of course, a logbook doesn't require you to lift heavy but at 38 years old there are days where I can and do want to go heavy...so I take advantage of it and I go heavy. However, there are plenty of times where it isn't happening so like last week on a lower body day I did 5 sets of 10 with a challenging weight on squats.

I guess my point is my logbook will have different things in it all the time so it starts to feel borderline useless. The day I tossed the logbook was the day most of my injuries went away and I think it's because with my high level of stress I need much more flexibility in what a training day looks like.

I'm also not anti logbook at all. We chart and log things all the time for younger folks I work with.

For sure, I'll be 36 this month and obviously one can't break weight and reps every workout as we get a wee bit older. Unless you're Jordan Peters, who will have beginner gains until he's in his 40s.

"Everything is essentially infinitely progressible" fuck off, Jordan. For you, maybe :LOL:

And I'm not a "get a PR or drop it" guy, either. I might go a few weeks on an exercise with the same weight and reps, but if I feel a weight better the second or third time around, I consider that progress, too. I can become stubborn with some exercises that way, however, and possibly end up wasting time.

Even if you don't hit a PR every session, I still think logging makes you a bit more organized, and, as a result, a bit more dedicated. I know it has for me. Now I'm up at 4 in the morning watching training vids and staring at my illegible notes, psyching myself out lol
 

Cv215

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
336
I keep a log but i dont get crazy with it. I don't necessarily put every set of every excercise. I mainly just log the top sets, and only on excercises that i care about. Sometimes i do forget how many reps i did the week before or exactly what weight i went up to. I just keep a log on my phone. I don't like writing shit down.
 

Ruhlfreak55

Active member
Registered
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
653
I've logged everything since the beginning. I have notebooks upon notebooks full. I mostly use it week to week to make sure I don't do the same exercises in the same order week per week on a given bodypart.
 

N.L....M.....

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Sep 12, 2020
Messages
289
I log everything from rest times, negative count, to how the lift felt that day. I’ll even make notes to change a lift next time depending on how it feels
 

mpjuice

Verified Customer
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
Jan 25, 2013
Messages
556
I keep workouts the same for the most part until my joints start bothering me or cannot beat my lift 2-3 workouts in a row (depending if I believe it was some sort of temporary fatigue due to stressful day at work ect). Then I make an adjustment or deload. Because my workouts are fairly simple (high intensity low volume) and I keep tempo the same for a meso cycle I'm able to remember what my lifts were. I have my wife keep a logbook because every time I ask her what she lifted last time she wasn't quite sure. Sometimes I'll write what my zero reps in reserve five rep max is in her log book. especially if it involves 2.5 lb plates etc.

So I guess my answer is kind of.
 

aphextwin

Well-known member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
4,445
I’ve never once logged one workout. I’m able to remember exactly what I work each week. I change things up every few months so my body doesn’t get so use to the same old workouts.

I’m not saying I’m against it but it’s not for me.
 

TheOtherOne55

Sponsor Rep
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Sponsors
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Messages
3,452
Been logging my workout religiously for the past 4 years and my progress has taken off.
I spent too much of my 20's doing random pump workouts and ending up benching the same weight year in year out.

I log the main loading exercises in each WO (maybe 3-4) and then maybe another exercise or two or MR or pump training. The key to logbooking is: 1. losing your ego for certain parts of training and 2. having multiple rotations.
Every 4-5 months I end up having a back-off week where I scale back the weight and choose a new PR. If you're strong, you'll eventually starting beating numbers with meh form and momentum. At that point you need to lose your ego and drop the weight 20-50lbs and restart the log from there...a more controlled rep. Jordan has talked about this before.
And also, people assume logging in just the same exercise every week. Hell no. If I flat benched and tried to beat my PR every week, i'd last 2 weeks MAAYBE. You HAVE to have 2-3 rotations of different exercises. Diff movement patterns, Diff stress each week. If I've had a week or two away from my Smith Incline Bench, I'm a little more confident in my ability.
 

pesty4077

Moderator/ Featured Member / Kilo Klub
Staff member
Moderator
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
9,151
Damn, stop acting so old still writing things down. 😂😂😂 Seriously, I log my foods and workouts, but I just use phone apps. You made me laugh seeing that log book and I am an old fucker. 😂😂
 

Fit2Serve

Well-known member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 5, 2015
Messages
1,718
newb tool imo.
useful tool for younger guys
after time and alot of gains i just dont think its realistic to continue to beat previous lifts. if it were true id be squating 2,000lbs lol
so, it has its place in the beginning i think but being a veteran lifter i think its a lil tedious and not important at all. like not at all.
-F2S
 

Dadbod3000

Active member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
134
I was keeping a spreadsheet of my supplementation at one point
 

Kaladryn

Featured Member / Kilo Klub
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Messages
5,610
I used logs for about 10 years, but especially as I have gotten older, I need to go by instincts, and using a log will just make me pay less attention to instincts.

I do make mental "on next workout" notes to myself that I think about when I train that body part again.

I log the hell out of my diet though :)
 

hawkmoon

Featured Member / Kilo Klub
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
2,078
When I first discovered DC I kept a logbook for a few years. Fun to look back on these notes now.
I do not log now as a) I'm pretty accurate in my estimations b) daily progression isn't' a priority, nor really practical at my age.
 

Staff online

Forum statistics

Total page views
505,645,462
Threads
124,208
Messages
2,379,473
Members
155,508
Latest member
sandman88
Top