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Training- Best movements for every bodypart

Elvia1023

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Training is a passion of mine and I have pretty much tried everything over the years. The basic movements are generally the best but over the years I have learnt that for me (and others) every muscle can respond differently. I figured I would write this brief thread and others could write what they have noticed and it may help a few guys out who have lagging body parts. Obviously for most things we want to be using great form (targeting the intended muscle effectively) whilst progressing in strength in a variety of rep ranges (5-8, 8-12, 15+). Although for me some muscles have responded best when I moved away from the "basics".

Delts- training all 3 heads every rotation, pretty standard stuff, heavy pressing, lateral raises (I prefer db's but cables are great too), research the best form for lateral raises as it makes a big difference, drop sets, 1 working (6-12) and 1 drop off (12-15) is a great approach. 8-12 reps most of the time though.

Chest- I really had to perfect the form for my chest to start growing. I could bench press 4pps with a shitty chest for years so form was key for me. I had to start with less weight but over time progressed in strength with improved execution. Any pressing movement I can feel a good contraction (plate loaded machines, db presses etc). Pec Deck and chest dips. 1 working (6-12) and 1 drop off (12-15) is a great approach. 8-12 reps most of the time though.

Back- Generally heavier movements. Big weights for density. Unilateral movements for lats. Seated cable rows and chest supported rows pulling with my elbows low and at my side. Behind the back barbell shrugs. Heavy pullovers. I have a bad lower back so I prefer seated DB deadlifts.

Bi-ceps- generally higher reps, constant tension, unilateral training, concentration. Cable curls and machine preacher curls (both unilateral then both arms). Heavy db hammer curls. Supersets. Don't need to push the weight and it's more about form, tension, squeeze etc. 12-15 reps.

Tri-ceps- heavy and basic movements. Heavy skullcrushers, close grip bench and dips. Combining one compound and one isolation/pump movement (pushdowns being my fav). Drop sets. Negatives (stretch). 10-12 reps.

Quads- high but heavy reps, deep rom leg press, hack squats, leg extensions, pain, torture, drop sets, rest paused sets etc. Many respond best to squats but not everyone.

Hams- a bit of everything but lot's of intensity techniques, drop sets, static holds, negative reps etc. Deep ROM leg press, seated leg curls, stiff leg deadlifts (straight leg for higher reps with lighter weight and slightly bent knee for heavier weights).

Calves- everything, heavy weight, lighter weight, 12-15 reps, 15-30 reps, very high reps (50+), calf presses and seated calf raises, drop sets, static holds on the negative, full rom, key word "stretch", cardio tiptoes, tibialis raises (db or machine are my fav), deep tissue massage, stretch again.

Abs- mainly bodyweight exercises, vacuums, twists, some weighted crunches, higher reps, minimal rest.
 

heavyhitter

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Delts: the things that have made the biggest differences in my delt development have been starting shoulder day with rear lateral work every time ala John meadows. I hammer away a few high rep sets of band pullaparts, incline bench rear delt swings, or pec deck delt flyes. Then onto laterals, I love the lateral machines and use them nearly every workout rest pause style. Crushes em. I also love high rep, stupid heavy partial laterals. Then I do a pressing movement. Typically a dumbell press, Bradford press, or rack drag press(another John meadows movement)
These are all great exercises and if you notice something about them all....looots of time under tension. I don’t lock out shoulder presses and I like high reps for laterals. Blows me up

chest: couple things. Barbell movements suck for me unless they are reverse banded. Then I love them. I prefer neutral or close to it grip work on chest. So dumbell presses, incline banded dumbell presses, hammer strength incline, and smith slight incline(the one barbell chest move I do) is the brunt of my heavy chest work. Training on the dc 3 way split obviously I rotate these in and out with similar exercise but pretty much always neutral grip. I get the most chest activation this way. Then I finish of with a really good stretch movement like dumbell or cable flyes, or DC peck deck push presses for high reps in the 15-20 range. Boom

Back:back is a bodypart that takes some ingenuity for me. I’ve never grown much from standard barbell rows or deadlifts. Here are my favorite back movements in order
Prone rows, angles90 grips hammer strength pulldowns(google Paul carter doing these. These grips allow you to use a neutral grip on any machine or exercise. These are a fucking game changer!!! No more elbow tendinitis for me, and they engage the lats way better)
1 arm barbell rows, rack chins, dead stop dumbell rows, cable pulldowns, rack dead/high pull hybrid, various shrugs with a slow negative and 5 second hold on the contraction for 15-20 reps. I like 8-12 reps for all other back exercises

biceps: I learned a long time ago that trying to go heavy on biceps gave me constant lateral epicondylitis, and didn’t grow my arms much. When I started training in the 12-20 range they blew up. Most I might use on dumbell curls would be about 35s but man I make those things hard. Hard contractions, slow negatives, big squeeze at the top. My favorite exercises are spider curls, preacher machines, grip4rce curls with barbells or dumbells, and spud inc towel strap cable curls.
I always train for arms with some form of reverse grip, hammer, or pinwheel curl, and finish with elitefts grenade attachment forearm curls

triceps: start with heavy compound movements, move on to stretching movements.
I typically start with a cable movement for high reps to warm up. Then onto either dip machine tricep dips, close grip bench, or reverse grip bench. I vary these by doing them in a smith machine on a bench and as a floor press.
then I move on to either jm presses, pjr pullovers, skuklcrushers, or dumbell roll ups. After that I want a huuuuuge stretch!! Either French presses, 1 arm overhead dumbell extensions, or overhead cable or machine extensions. After that I finish off with either tricep push downs using 2 ropes(1 in each hand) or my spud strap tricep push downs. I like 12-15 reps for most


hamstrings: always always always train hams before quads. Gets them pumped and they act like a cushion on squats and leg presses, and it gets a lot of blood around the knee for your heavy work. I only do about 4 movements for hams and they work like hell for me.
Banded glute ham raises(sometimes called razor curls. I learned these from Laura Phelps sweat and they’re fucking incredible. I get such terrible hamstring cramps afterwards I sometimes can’t walk for awhile! I can show how to do them if anyone cares to know) lying curls, seated curls, rdl’s. That’s it. I like a little higher reps for hams. 12-15.

Quads:after hams I always start with some sort of squat, front squat, leg press. Lots of warmups and then a heavy set of 10-12 and a heavier set of 6-8.
after that I’ll pick another one of the above exercises and do the same sets and reps.
then I finish with a stretch move like lunges, extensions, or sissy squats. Then a dc style widowmaker and done. This has always worked for me since day 1 19 years old doing the dc 2 way split

calves: I train calves 3-4 days a week and only back off when the soles of my feet hurt. 2 sets dc style supersetted with 2 high rep straight sets of banded tib raises. In 20 years of training this combo in the last 4 years has been the only thing to finally force them to grow

abs: I really don’t train abs. They get lots of stimulation from my other exercises and honestly when I powerlifted and hit them like crazy they got all the development they’ll ever need. Once in a blue moon I’ll bust out the ab roller but it’s few and far between.

VERY important!!!! DC style stretches after every bodypart. Huge difference in my recovery when I do them vs without
 

Elvia1023

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Delts: the things that have made the biggest differences in my delt development have been starting shoulder day with rear lateral work every time ala John meadows. I hammer away a few high rep sets of band pullaparts, incline bench rear delt swings, or pec deck delt flyes. Then onto laterals, I love the lateral machines and use them nearly every workout rest pause style. Crushes em. I also love high rep, stupid heavy partial laterals. Then I do a pressing movement. Typically a dumbell press, Bradford press, or rack drag press(another John meadows movement)
These are all great exercises and if you notice something about them all....looots of time under tension. I don’t lock out shoulder presses and I like high reps for laterals. Blows me up

chest: couple things. Barbell movements suck for me unless they are reverse banded. Then I love them. I prefer neutral or close to it grip work on chest. So dumbell presses, incline banded dumbell presses, hammer strength incline, and smith slight incline(the one barbell chest move I do) is the brunt of my heavy chest work. Training on the dc 3 way split obviously I rotate these in and out with similar exercise but pretty much always neutral grip. I get the most chest activation this way. Then I finish of with a really good stretch movement like dumbell or cable flyes, or DC peck deck push presses for high reps in the 15-20 range. Boom

Back:back is a bodypart that takes some ingenuity for me. I’ve never grown much from standard barbell rows or deadlifts. Here are my favorite back movements in order
Prone rows, angles90 grips hammer strength pulldowns(google Paul carter doing these. These grips allow you to use a neutral grip on any machine or exercise. These are a fucking game changer!!! No more elbow tendinitis for me, and they engage the lats way better)
1 arm barbell rows, rack chins, dead stop dumbell rows, cable pulldowns, rack dead/high pull hybrid, various shrugs with a slow negative and 5 second hold on the contraction for 15-20 reps. I like 8-12 reps for all other back exercises

biceps: I learned a long time ago that trying to go heavy on biceps gave me constant lateral epicondylitis, and didn’t grow my arms much. When I started training in the 12-20 range they blew up. Most I might use on dumbell curls would be about 35s but man I make those things hard. Hard contractions, slow negatives, big squeeze at the top. My favorite exercises are spider curls, preacher machines, grip4rce curls with barbells or dumbells, and spud inc towel strap cable curls.
I always train for arms with some form of reverse grip, hammer, or pinwheel curl, and finish with elitefts grenade attachment forearm curls

triceps: start with heavy compound movements, move on to stretching movements.
I typically start with a cable movement for high reps to warm up. Then onto either dip machine tricep dips, close grip bench, or reverse grip bench. I vary these by doing them in a smith machine on a bench and as a floor press.
then I move on to either jm presses, pjr pullovers, skuklcrushers, or dumbell roll ups. After that I want a huuuuuge stretch!! Either French presses, 1 arm overhead dumbell extensions, or overhead cable or machine extensions. After that I finish off with either tricep push downs using 2 ropes(1 in each hand) or my spud strap tricep push downs. I like 12-15 reps for most


hamstrings: always always always train hams before quads. Gets them pumped and they act like a cushion on squats and leg presses, and it gets a lot of blood around the knee for your heavy work. I only do about 4 movements for hams and they work like hell for me.
Banded glute ham raises(sometimes called razor curls. I learned these from Laura Phelps sweat and they’re fucking incredible. I get such terrible hamstring cramps afterwards I sometimes can’t walk for awhile! I can show how to do them if anyone cares to know) lying curls, seated curls, rdl’s. That’s it. I like a little higher reps for hams. 12-15.

Quads:after hams I always start with some sort of squat, front squat, leg press. Lots of warmups and then a heavy set of 10-12 and a heavier set of 6-8.
after that I’ll pick another one of the above exercises and do the same sets and reps.
then I finish with a stretch move like lunges, extensions, or sissy squats. Then a dc style widowmaker and done. This has always worked for me since day 1 19 years old doing the dc 2 way split

calves: I train calves 3-4 days a week and only back off when the soles of my feet hurt. 2 sets dc style supersetted with 2 high rep straight sets of banded tib raises. In 20 years of training this combo in the last 4 years has been the only thing to finally force them to grow

abs: I really don’t train abs. They get lots of stimulation from my other exercises and honestly when I powerlifted and hit them like crazy they got all the development they’ll ever need. Once in a blue moon I’ll bust out the ab roller but it’s few and far between.

VERY important!!!! DC style stretches after every bodypart. Huge difference in my recovery when I do them vs without

Great stuff. I am going to bed now but a few things stood out. I like to do heavy partial lateral raises. I usually superset them with a lighter full rom version afterwards. I actually do the same with reverse pec deck and do a partial rom then full with lighter weight. Pretty much 90% of my leg workouts go calves, hams, hip/glutes, quads and stretches. I like to really warm up my entire leg before hitting quads hard.

There is so much to training that we are obviously going to miss out so many things and I did with one of the most important things I do. When I go from one body part to another I like to merge them together when possible. On days I train hams then quads I will finish hams with a leg press variation that hits both my hams and quads. I sometimes gradually move my feet down to engage my quads more each set. The same for training delts and finishing with an incline press moving into chest.

I googled that angles90 grip. I actually done some pulldowns the other day just using 2 single handles that my gym has but they fit on the pulldown bar so I could do it with a neutral grip. Although I don't really rate most pulldown movements as they just irritate my distal bi-cep tendons. It's been an issue of mine for a few years now. If I am in a cable station and move the handle down slightly so do a high pulley row I have no issues. When going heavy I prefer sitting on an incline bench facing the pulley machine and that is my fav lat exercise and the engagement is incredible. I do them unilaterally and pull my elbow down/back to my side. I have always struggled with engaging my lats but not anymore with those and the seated (horizontal) unilateral cable rows
 

heavyhitter

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The nice thing about the angles90 is the way the grips are shaped you don’t really even have to hang on. It naturally forces your fingers to stay curled around it. This removes the forearms from the movement for me so my arms can just act like a lever. Using these for my pulldowns and rack chins, and even cable rows and t-bars has completely saved my forearms from near crippling pain.
mans the way you describe doing pulldowns is how I do mine too. Learned it from Paul carter and it really helps engage the lats properly and not the upper back like most pulldowns do
Great stuff. I am going to bed now but a few things stood out. I like to do heavy partial lateral raises. I usually superset them with a lighter full rom version afterwards. I actually do the same with reverse pec deck and do a partial rom then full with lighter weight. Pretty much 90% of my leg workouts go calves, hams, hip/glutes, quads and stretches. I like to really warm up my entire leg before hitting quads hard.

There is so much to training that we are obviously going to miss out so many things and I did with one of the most important things I do. When I go from one body part to another I like to merge them together when possible. On days I train hams then quads I will finish hams with a leg press variation that hits both my hams and quads. I sometimes gradually move my feet down to engage my quads more each set. The same for training delts and finishing with an incline press moving into chest.

I googled that angles90 grip. I actually done some pulldowns the other day just using 2 single handles that my gym has but they fit on the pulldown bar so I could do it with a neutral grip. Although I don't really rate most pulldown movements as they just irritate my distal bi-cep tendons. It's been an issue of mine for a few years now. If I am in a cable station and move the handle down slightly so do a high pulley row I have no issues. When going heavy I prefer sitting on an incline bench facing the pulley machine and that is my fav lat exercise and the engagement is incredible. I do them unilaterally and pull my elbow down/back to my side. I have always struggled with engaging my lats but not anymore with those and the seated (horizontal) unilateral cable rows
 

danieltx

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Reps:
  • Upper body - 8-12
  • Lower body - 10-15
  • Calves - 8-10
  • Tibialis - 10-12
  • Forearms - 6-10
  • Abs - 25
Chest:
  • Warm up with a cable fly to ensure pecs do the work on presses
  • I like heavy pressing on a Smith or Hammer Strength
    • Flat 465 x 1
    • Incline 405 x 7
    • HS incline 450 x 8
  • Slingshot is a great way to train heavy while minimizing injury risk
  • After pressing, finish with 3 more sets of flys, DB or cable
  • Warm up properly for presses. My flat bench warmup:
    • 135 x 8
    • 225 x 4
    • 275 x 2
    • 365 x 1 - Slingshot
    • Work sets
Back:
  • I do a rowing day and a pulling day
  • Don't row with your arms - imagine your elbow is connected to your lat and squeeze it by pulling your elbow back
  • Be conscious of range of motion - your elbow doesn't need to come a foot behind you
  • For guys with longer arms, ideal ROM requires even more experimentation
  • Rowing exercises:
    • Hammer Strength low row
    • Hammer Strength high row
  • I like rack deadlifts on a Smith machine that's angled towards you - I get a much better squeeze than with a barbell
  • No heavy low rep stuff - heavy weight for reps
    • 515 x 10
    • 455 x 15
  • Always deadlift last to minimize injury risk
  • Versa Grips are better than straps
  • Pulling exercises:
    • Pulldowns seated with a Free Motion double stack
    • Hammer Strength underhand / neutral grip pulldown
    • Cable pullover unilateral
      • I'm 6' with long arms and never found a pullover machine that I can feel in my lats, this hits them really well
  • Also hit rear delts on pull day
  • Also hit traps on pull day
    • Smith shrugs to front
    • Smith shrugs behind back
Delts:
  • 2 push days, one I focus on medial delts and the other front and medial delts
  • Start with 3 unilateral sets lateral raises / front raises on Free Motion stack
    • Raises are not just raising your arm up - squeeze the delt to raise your arm
    • Imagine pouring out a tea kettle for lateral raises
    • Do them with elbows bent like an upright row and with arms straight out
  • I like heavy military and behind the neck presses on a Smith machine:
    • 315 x 12 military
    • 335 x 6 military
    • 255 x 8 behind the neck
  • After presses, finish with 2 more sets unilateral seated lateral / front raises with dumbbells
    • This is literally the only thing I do in a gym with dumbbells
    • Usually just do 1 rest-pause set here
Biceps:
  • 2 pull days, one I just do regular curls and one I do have regular curls, half hammer curls
  • Everything unilateral
  • I like:
    • Hammer Strength preacher curl plate loaded
    • Life Fitness preacher curl selectorized
    • Free Motion bicep (regular curls and hammer curls)
    • Nautilus bisolator
  • For guys with long arms, be careful of positioning - ex. I have to have my elbow bone at the top of the pad on preacher curls
Triceps:
  • 2 push days, hit different heads
  • Everything unilteral
  • I like:
    • Pushdown
    • Underhand pushdown
    • Hammer Strength dip plate loaded
Quads:
 

danieltx

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Quads:
  • Start with abductors and adductors or you won't get big legs
  • 4 sets of leg extensions to start
  • 4 sets Free Motion Hack squat plate loaded
  • 4 sets leg press
  • Use knee wraps on 1-2 heaviest sets of squats and leg press
  • Don't get dumb with ROM, no need to go extreme for most guys
Hamstrings:
  • I like to hit them every way - seated, standing, and lying
  • Seated and standing curls first to get a good pump
  • Then SLDL to stretch them out
  • Finish with lying leg curls
Abs:
  • I only train them when dieting but I think there's benefit to training them with heavy weight early on to get that pop to the muscle
  • I use pretty much whatever selectorized ab machine is available, usually only 30-50lbs. for 25 reps
  • Practice vacuums - they'll keep you waist tighter
Forearms:
  • Train them at the end of both back days
  • 3 sets wrist curls and 3 sets overhand curls
  • I like to train them seated on a Free Motion bicep stack
  • Most guys say high reps, I always trained mine like 6-10 and and had good results
 

heavyhitter

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I like you prefer to do my wrist curls very heavy for 6-10 reps and do my best to roll the bar all the way down to my fingertips and roll it all the way back up with a hard contraction. Very slow negative
Quads:
  • Start with abductors and adductors or you won't get big legs
  • 4 sets of leg extensions to start
  • 4 sets Free Motion Hack squat plate loaded
  • 4 sets leg press
  • Use knee wraps on 1-2 heaviest sets of squats and leg press
  • Don't get dumb with ROM, no need to go extreme for most guys
Hamstrings:
  • I like to hit them every way - seated, standing, and lying
  • Seated and standing curls first to get a good pump
  • Then SLDL to stretch them out
  • Finish with lying leg curls
Abs:
  • I only train them when dieting but I think there's benefit to training them with heavy weight early on to get that pop to the muscle
  • I use pretty much whatever selectorized ab machine is available, usually only 30-50lbs. for 25 reps
  • Practice vacuums - they'll keep you waist tighter
Forearms:
  • Train them at the end of both back days
  • 3 sets wrist curls and 3 sets overhand curls
  • I like to train them seated on a Free Motion bicep stack
  • Most guys say high reps, I always trained mine like 6-10 and and had good results
 

TheOneAlone

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these are most of my favorites
Quads -
Free motion plate loaded squat machine
Leg press
Smith machine squat
Walking lunges

chest - Bench press
Smith machine press and smith incline press
Seated cable fly machine
DB press flat

back - pull-ups
Tbar row
Smith machine row
Rack pulls

hamstrings - lying leg curl
Smith machine rdl

biceps - Anything bicep targeted works for me

brachialis - One arm dB hammer curl superset both arms

triceps - Skullcrusher
Extensions and press downs on the cable
Dips

traps - Shrugs

Rear delts - reverse pec dec
Rear delt dB fly

anterior and front delts - behind the back seated smith machine press
DB seated press
Lateral raise w/ dB
Front raise bb , dB or cable

Lower back and abs
Ab crunch machine
Roman chair leg raises
Vacuums
Reverse hyper extensions

calves - leg press calf raise
Seated calf raise
Smith machine standing calf raise
 

USMuscle9403

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Hell yea, this is what I'm talking about...buncha big fuckers talking about training

This is gonna be a good thread
 

b-boy

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The best movements are the ones that work best with your mechanics, the exercises that YOU feel the muscle activated the best.
1. This will differ from person to person
2. It takes a while for you to figure those exercises out. It's a trial and error kind of thing that takes time in the gym doing different exercises over time to get it figured out.

This is definitely not a beginner type of question and answer. Most new lifters will begin with the basics like bench press, squat, barbell shoulder press, ect. and work in a progressive fashion with strength, as you get stronger and more adapt at lifting and pushing yourself you venture on to new exercises and continue the progressive strength model. It will takes YEARS in the gym and building a very good mind-muscle connection for you to figure out little odd angles and exercises that actually work best for you.
 

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since the lockdown in november here in germany ive tried tons of different things.
WHat ive found out since then:
My body responds amazingly well to heavy band work.
Ive invested a pretty good amount of money into different bands (short ones with 7 different strengths, long ones 4 different strengths and i always buy them pair-wise)
I do not ditch barbell work but right now i would say i am at 50/50 splitted between band work and barbell work.
for chest:
-safety pins in a rack in the lowest possible spot. 3 different strengths of bands on each side. Low incline bench in the mid of the rack.
Now perform band flys, work up to a heavy set where you can use all 3 bands for around 8 clean reps. Drop 1 band at a time for a triple reduction set.
Squeeze at the top.
for back:
use a door attachment that you can put between the door and the frame at the top and the the bottom.
Put a long band through the attachment, grab each side of the band. Perform high row and low rows sitting on a bench.
also great movement: HEavy long banded 1arm rows. Put a band through something static then can withstand a good amount of force.
go back as many steps as needed to get a good stretch but still perform a full contraction. Hold onto something when you are there to focus on the lat and not on not getting pulled forward. Perform the movment, slow clean reps.

If someone is interested in the other body parts i could add them but i am not sure how you guys like band work :D
 

Biggerp73

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Recently discovered weighted dips for the pecs, never had anything work and grow that line on the pec between the armpit and nipple like it does with weighted dips.... Of course incline press (I prefer barbell with elbows tucked in)..

Back... Gotta be machine pullovers. Next, incline rows (standing or sitting with dumbbells = hits upper back width, rear delts, and traps... The T Shirt muscles of the back

Quads... Lately I feel like squats and functional movements like lunges are best... For squats, use the form that takes stress off your back... For me that means using a very wide stance with my toes pointed out.. that allows me to go heavy while keeping my back straight..

Calves.. stiff leg raises, whether seated or standing .

Biceps... Single arm preacher cable curls and dumbbell hammer curls

Triceps... My secret single arm dumbbell seated over head extension using a twisting motion through the movement

Shoulders.. dumbbell laterals... In a class of their own.... Followed by upright rows and pressing movements
 

Dugbet

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Hell yea, this is what I'm talking about...buncha big fuckers talking about training

This is gonna be a good thread

In the end we have a lot of information, but who has the time and memory to apply the tricks of others?

90% will do the same exercises and techniques, then, there will be some individual differences.

In order not to be a pain in the ass and to add something of value to this thread I will say that adding forced repetitions with heavy weights to squats, press, deadlifts... will give you a different dimension to training. I'm talking specifically about having thick bands, do your usual 3-4 set, in the final set, when you feel like you can't take it anymore, rest for 15-20 seconds, tie the band to reduce the resistance at its most critical point and keep going until you can't take it anymore.
 

Elvia1023

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It should go without stating this will change person to person. Even with guidance training is a craft that takes many years to understand and adapt to your own body. Even with a list of the best exercises someone may not be suited to many of them. Moreover, their form could be completely different to what is intended. 2 people could do the same movement and perform it in a very similar way to the naked eye but one is getting very little from it whilst the other lot's of effective stimulation. It's all about mind muscle connection and some find that easier than others generally and also on a movement by movement basis. That's why it's key picking movements that feel good and suit your body. If you are doing an exercise and you never feel it in the targeted muscle you need to look at your form and/or change the movement for something else. The most common in that regard are all the people who think they need to flat bench press for a big chest and that couldn't be further from the truth. At the same time I do think many things work for the majority of people and all training if done safely is going to work to an extent. Execution/form is vital and whilst genetic elites respond well to any stimulation for many (and for all) it's about finding those right movements/angles/techniques. An example I think anyone would benefit from the way I (and many) do cable rows if they aren't already doing it and they struggle with engaging their lats when training back.
 

UsmcOldSchoolMuscle

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Delts: the things that have made the biggest differences in my delt development have been starting shoulder day with rear lateral work every time ala John meadows. I hammer away a few high rep sets of band pullaparts, incline bench rear delt swings, or pec deck delt flyes. Then onto laterals, I love the lateral machines and use them nearly every workout rest pause style. Crushes em. I also love high rep, stupid heavy partial laterals. Then I do a pressing movement. Typically a dumbell press, Bradford press, or rack drag press(another John meadows movement)
These are all great exercises and if you notice something about them all....looots of time under tension. I don’t lock out shoulder presses and I like high reps for laterals. Blows me up

chest: couple things. Barbell movements suck for me unless they are reverse banded. Then I love them. I prefer neutral or close to it grip work on chest. So dumbell presses, incline banded dumbell presses, hammer strength incline, and smith slight incline(the one barbell chest move I do) is the brunt of my heavy chest work. Training on the dc 3 way split obviously I rotate these in and out with similar exercise but pretty much always neutral grip. I get the most chest activation this way. Then I finish of with a really good stretch movement like dumbell or cable flyes, or DC peck deck push presses for high reps in the 15-20 range. Boom

Back:back is a bodypart that takes some ingenuity for me. I’ve never grown much from standard barbell rows or deadlifts. Here are my favorite back movements in order
Prone rows, angles90 grips hammer strength pulldowns(google Paul carter doing these. These grips allow you to use a neutral grip on any machine or exercise. These are a fucking game changer!!! No more elbow tendinitis for me, and they engage the lats way better)
1 arm barbell rows, rack chins, dead stop dumbell rows, cable pulldowns, rack dead/high pull hybrid, various shrugs with a slow negative and 5 second hold on the contraction for 15-20 reps. I like 8-12 reps for all other back exercises

biceps: I learned a long time ago that trying to go heavy on biceps gave me constant lateral epicondylitis, and didn’t grow my arms much. When I started training in the 12-20 range they blew up. Most I might use on dumbell curls would be about 35s but man I make those things hard. Hard contractions, slow negatives, big squeeze at the top. My favorite exercises are spider curls, preacher machines, grip4rce curls with barbells or dumbells, and spud inc towel strap cable curls.
I always train for arms with some form of reverse grip, hammer, or pinwheel curl, and finish with elitefts grenade attachment forearm curls

triceps: start with heavy compound movements, move on to stretching movements.
I typically start with a cable movement for high reps to warm up. Then onto either dip machine tricep dips, close grip bench, or reverse grip bench. I vary these by doing them in a smith machine on a bench and as a floor press.
then I move on to either jm presses, pjr pullovers, skuklcrushers, or dumbell roll ups. After that I want a huuuuuge stretch!! Either French presses, 1 arm overhead dumbell extensions, or overhead cable or machine extensions. After that I finish off with either tricep push downs using 2 ropes(1 in each hand) or my spud strap tricep push downs. I like 12-15 reps for most


hamstrings: always always always train hams before quads. Gets them pumped and they act like a cushion on squats and leg presses, and it gets a lot of blood around the knee for your heavy work. I only do about 4 movements for hams and they work like hell for me.
Banded glute ham raises(sometimes called razor curls. I learned these from Laura Phelps sweat and they’re fucking incredible. I get such terrible hamstring cramps afterwards I sometimes can’t walk for awhile! I can show how to do them if anyone cares to know) lying curls, seated curls, rdl’s. That’s it. I like a little higher reps for hams. 12-15.

Quads:after hams I always start with some sort of squat, front squat, leg press. Lots of warmups and then a heavy set of 10-12 and a heavier set of 6-8.
after that I’ll pick another one of the above exercises and do the same sets and reps.
then I finish with a stretch move like lunges, extensions, or sissy squats. Then a dc style widowmaker and done. This has always worked for me since day 1 19 years old doing the dc 2 way split

calves: I train calves 3-4 days a week and only back off when the soles of my feet hurt. 2 sets dc style supersetted with 2 high rep straight sets of banded tib raises. In 20 years of training this combo in the last 4 years has been the only thing to finally force them to grow

abs: I really don’t train abs. They get lots of stimulation from my other exercises and honestly when I powerlifted and hit them like crazy they got all the development they’ll ever need. Once in a blue moon I’ll bust out the ab roller but it’s few and far between.

VERY important!!!! DC style stretches after every bodypart. Huge difference in my recovery when I do them vs without
Great Post Brother
 

UsmcOldSchoolMuscle

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Training is a passion of mine and I have pretty much tried everything over the years. The basic movements are generally the best but over the years I have learnt that for me (and others) every muscle can respond differently. I figured I would write this brief thread and others could write what they have noticed and it may help a few guys out who have lagging body parts. Obviously for most things we want to be using great form (targeting the intended muscle effectively) whilst progressing in strength in a variety of rep ranges (5-8, 8-12, 15+). Although for me some muscles have responded best when I moved away from the "basics".

Delts- training all 3 heads every rotation, pretty standard stuff, heavy pressing, lateral raises (I prefer db's but cables are great too), research the best form for lateral raises as it makes a big difference, drop sets, 1 working (6-12) and 1 drop off (12-15) is a great approach. 8-12 reps most of the time though.

Chest- I really had to perfect the form for my chest to start growing. I could bench press 4pps with a shitty chest for years so form was key for me. I had to start with less weight but over time progressed in strength with improved execution. Any pressing movement I can feel a good contraction (plate loaded machines, db presses etc). Pec Deck and chest dips. 1 working (6-12) and 1 drop off (12-15) is a great approach. 8-12 reps most of the time though.

Back- Generally heavier movements. Big weights for density. Unilateral movements for lats. Seated cable rows and chest supported rows pulling with my elbows low and at my side. Behind the back barbell shrugs. Heavy pullovers. I have a bad lower back so I prefer seated DB deadlifts.

Bi-ceps- generally higher reps, constant tension, unilateral training, concentration. Cable curls and machine preacher curls (both unilateral then both arms). Heavy db hammer curls. Supersets. Don't need to push the weight and it's more about form, tension, squeeze etc. 12-15 reps.

Tri-ceps- heavy and basic movements. Heavy skullcrushers, close grip bench and dips. Combining one compound and one isolation/pump movement (pushdowns being my fav). Drop sets. Negatives (stretch). 10-12 reps.

Quads- high but heavy reps, deep rom leg press, hack squats, leg extensions, pain, torture, drop sets, rest paused sets etc. Many respond best to squats but not everyone.

Hams- a bit of everything but lot's of intensity techniques, drop sets, static holds, negative reps etc. Deep ROM leg press, seated leg curls, stiff leg deadlifts (straight leg for higher reps with lighter weight and slightly bent knee for heavier weights).

Calves- everything, heavy weight, lighter weight, 12-15 reps, 15-30 reps, very high reps (50+), calf presses and seated calf raises, drop sets, static holds on the negative, full rom, key word "stretch", cardio tiptoes, tibialis raises (db or machine are my fav), deep tissue massage, stretch again.

Abs- mainly bodyweight exercises, vacuums, twists, some weighted crunches, higher reps, minimal rest.
I enjoyed the post Elvia... Many thanks

I have never tried the Seated Dumbbell "deadlifts". I will give these a go.
I also have seen mountaindog1 showing a seated "good mornings" variation which I will also give consideration.
 

heavyhitter

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I enjoyed the post Elvia... Many thanks

I have never tried the Seated Dumbbell "deadlifts". I will give these a go.
I also have seen mountaindog1 showing a seated "good mornings" variation which I will also give consideration.
Seated good mornings are awesome as well and will smash your erectors and glutes. I only do good mornings seated due to a back injury. Slow controlled negative, explosive positive
 

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