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1 Year Heart Update

nothuman

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I knew generally but I don't think I ever knew the entire history.

Yea there definitely seems to be a correlation between GH use and heart size. I've seen some studies indicating GH helping with the GI issues I have but I'd be way too scared to risk it messing with my heart.

I'm a little confused about your E/A numbers. This is just from Wikipedia:
-Normal diastolic function (E > A)
-Impaired relaxation (E:A reversal i.e. E is < A)
-Pseudonormal (E:A ratio appears normal)
-Restrictive filling (E:A ratio often > 2)

If you were at 1.3 that seems to indicate things were normal. And if you're now at 0.8 that seems to indicate an issue (impaired relaxation). Mine is the opposite end with >2 so "restrictive filling" according to this even though my "spectral doppler waveforms are more suggestive of normal diastolic function". Am I missing something with your numbers?

Regarding my cardio: I do 2hr of cardio per week. Typically that is about 1.5hr of LISS (130bpm) and one session of HIIT. This involves 10 all-out 15sec sprints on a bike. This gets me up to about 170bpm. At Cleveland Clinic last year my VO2 Max was 49. I feel like doing much more would just make my heart larger (as you know, extreme athletes tend to have more cardiac issues, more atrial fibrillation, and larger hearts).

I haven't gotten nt-ProBNP but I've gotten BNP tested numerous times and it's ranged from 4-25 (<100 being normal) so thus far that hasn't been an issue.

Yea. It's frustrating. I understand...the way the medical system is set up these doctors can't be spending an hour with one patient, but when it comes to something like the heart we're going to have a ton of questions especially if we're well read. And like you said, you see the report and then have a ton of questions. I'm going to see a men's health doctor who sort of has a specialty practice geared toward men who have used gear and want to optimize their health. We have an hour long consultation next week. As I've mentioned in this thread before I've worked with Dr. Rand McClain and while I like him I think he's too quick to brush things off. Always telling me my heart is totally normal for an athlete when it's clearly not. This new doctor is very serious about getting men to optimal health post AAS use so I'm hoping he has some answers for me. I'd love to start HCG and get my test a little higher if it's not going to make my problems worse but my heart health is my main concern. Will update everyone about what he says.
Sorry I just looked again and I had it reversed. E/A was 0.8 and now it is 1.3

If bnp or pro bnp is low, then cardio is not affected by a damaged heart, so that is good.
 

Pumped340

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Sorry I just looked again and I had it reversed. E/A was 0.8 and now it is 1.3

If bnp or pro bnp is low, then cardio is not affected by a damaged heart, so that is good.
Yea the BNP being low calms my mind a bit. What are your values?

I also mentioned the "edema" / sock lines I get. He said mine isn't that significant and my estimated "wedge pressure" is 4, with 8-15 being questionable and 15+ being problematic. Never heard of any of this either. The way he was talking though....it was like you said..."it should be fine" kind of attitude. I think it's just because relative to the medical messes they see our situation isn't a big deal but to us anything that isn't completely fine is a problem.
 

nothuman

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Yea the BNP being low calms my mind a bit. What are your values?

I also mentioned the "edema" / sock lines I get. He said mine isn't that significant and my estimated "wedge pressure" is 4, with 8-15 being questionable and 15+ being problematic. Never heard of any of this either. The way he was talking though....it was like you said..."it should be fine" kind of attitude. I think it's just because relative to the medical messes they see our situation isn't a big deal but to us anything that isn't completely fine is a problem.
I completely agree that the fact they don't want to tell us anything unless it's a big issue sucks. I get they don't want to scare patients but when people like us are inquisitive and really want the info, they should give it to us.

My Pro-BNP in March was really good. It was 14 (lab range 0-86 but I've read online anything over 200 is bad). I was nervous to get it tested because I was getting winded a bit but all I had to do was cut some weight and my endurance skyrocketed. Needless to say, that Pro-BNP really helped me sleep better at night.
 

Pumped340

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I completely agree that the fact they don't want to tell us anything unless it's a big issue sucks. I get they don't want to scare patients but when people like us are inquisitive and really want the info, they should give it to us.

My Pro-BNP in March was really good. It was 14 (lab range 0-86 but I've read online anything over 200 is bad). I was nervous to get it tested because I was getting winded a bit but all I had to do was cut some weight and my endurance skyrocketed. Needless to say, that Pro-BNP really helped me sleep better at night.
Yea that's great man, good to hear. Still doing HIIT 2-3x per week?

Forgot to mention above but apparently people with "Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome" do get chest pain....so these doctors previously telling me to relax because my chest pains weren't from my heart...well maybe it has been all this time. Before I was able to at least relax a bit thinking that as much as it sucks to feel pressure in my chest it wasn't my heart. Not anymore.
 

nothuman

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Yea that's great man, good to hear. Still doing HIIT 2-3x per week?

Forgot to mention above but apparently people with "Mitral Valve Prolapse Syndrome" do get chest pain....so these doctors previously telling me to relax because my chest pains weren't from my heart...well maybe it has been all this time. Before I was able to at least relax a bit thinking that as much as it sucks to feel pressure in my chest it wasn't my heart. Not anymore.
Yup, I'm headed to the gym in a couple of hours to do HIIT today as a matter of fact. I was previously doing it too often but I've settled in to 3x per week and not overly long each time. Only a few intervals has been shown to be beneficial for boosting fitness levels (I typically do 8 but sometimes I'll even do less).

Sounds like you may have figured that part out in terms of the chest pains.
 

nothuman

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@Pumped340 I looked at your 2015 test results again since this thread came back up on my feed, and your heart is suffering because your iron and thyroid were both very low (they almost always go hand in hand). I've been living though this myself. I would also venture to guess your cortisol may be low too. Most doctors wouldn't know this.
 

Pumped340

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@Pumped340 I looked at your 2015 test results again since this thread came back up on my feed, and your heart is suffering because your iron and thyroid were both very low (they almost always go hand in hand). I've been living though this myself. I would also venture to guess your cortisol may be low too. Most doctors wouldn't know this.
PM'd you about my thyroid and iron. Iron and ferritin have been low for many years due to my IBD....I should start supplementing with Iron.

Thyroid and cortisol levels are always normal though. Thyroid goes slightly low when dieting for a while.
 

nothuman

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PM'd you about my thyroid and iron. Iron and ferritin have been low for many years due to my IBD....I should start supplementing with Iron.

Thyroid and cortisol levels are always normal though. Thyroid goes slightly low when dieting for a while.
Hey I will answer you on the thread instead if you don't mind

You should look at a site like rt3-adrenals.org (my personal favorite) as it is very comprehensive as far as thyroid health goes and what else it affects. I went for years with a FT3 of around 2.9 as well and thought nothing of it because it's in the normal range. Turned out it was lower than when I was younger because I had lower iron than previously, thanks to blood donations and a major surgery.

Then I saw my Reverse T3 was in the 20s and read FT3 isn't optimal until it's in the high 3s. Having low iron will make thyroid medication not work as well though, so if you take T4, you'll likely only raise your RT3 level instead of your FT3 level, which you do not want. Your FT4 is in a good place in the low 1s, but the purpose of it is to create FT3, which is the gas that makes your thyroid function optimally.

I developed low iron from too many blood donations in order to keep my hematocrit/hemoglobin down. I noticed I had similar thyroid numbers as you for a few years. I didn't have noticeable symptoms for a while but the longer I went like that with lower iron, the lower my cortisol went down (adrenal glands). My worst symptom is severe brain fog, where my head is in some kind of trance all the time and makes it really hard to function. Also fatigue, memory loss, etc.

How are your lipids? I'm guessing they aren't as good as they could be unless you use supplements like krill oil, bergamot, etc. Lower thyroid and iron are likely the root cause.

So going back to myself, I threw every heart health supplement in the fold and still found my heart grow 1mm in a year. I am worried about the diastolic side of my heart (HFwPEF), which is the one there is no treatment for. I don't have it or anything, but if I do not fix my thyroid, it will slowly continue to get worse.

All the research I've done shows that low FT3 is really bad for the heart. I have all the studies that I will post to show you. Meanwhile, most doctors are under the bs impression that it can be the opposite, which is only true if FT3 is too high. I am still in the process of optimizing my thyroid and hope I am able to pull it off and feel like myself again. The good news is a lot of these studies say cardiac issues from low T3 are reversible (up to a point of course).

If I were you, I'd take a high dose of ferrous bisglycinate (most absorbable form of iron that has virtually no side effects) for a month and then get a full iron panel and thyroid panel again (get RT3 too bc it's a very important indicator of how your body converts T4 into T3). Being that you're on TRT, your iron should improve faster than a middle aged woman who is menstruating. At that point, you should add thyroid medication (can't say which one without seeing updated thyroid panel but it could either be T4, T3, or combo). I would also recommend ordering a 4 point cortisol saliva test and do that at home, so you can see if your natural cortisol production at four points of the day is normal or not. If not, you'd have to treat that too.

I am dealing with all this stuff now, and it took me forever to understand and figure out what was wrong with me. I really really think this is your issue as well. It's more common than people think. I am in groups where many others are dealing with the same stuff. Low iron, thyroid, and cortisol go hand in hand with each other. Some might call it "adrenal fatigue" but that is a very misleading term that minimizes what the actual problem is. Other important things that need to not be low are selenium (this is a big one), copper, zinc, d3, and b12. The site I mentioned explains all this.
 

nothuman

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The impact of thyroid hormone dysfunction on ischemic heart disease
2019 study

Thyroid Dysfunction in Heart Failure and other Cardiovascular Outcomes

A New Type of Nerve Cell Found in the Brain
It develops in the brain with the aid of thyroid hormone and regulate heart rhythm and blood pressure

Thyroid Replacement Therapy and Heart Failure

Thyroid Hormone and Cardiac Disease: From Basic Concepts to Clinical Application

The Role of Thyroid Hormone Therapy in Acutely Ill Cardiac Patients

T3: The Forgotten Thyroid Hormone
Dr. William Davis on low T3 and coronary heart disease

T3 Therapy Lowers the Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation After Cardiac Operations

T3 Effects on Cardiovascular System in Patients with Heart Failure
http://www.eurekaselect.com/82050/article

Relation Between Free T3/Free T4 Ratio, Echocardiographic Parameters and Mortality in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Low-T3 Syndrome: A Strong Prognostic Predictor of Death in Patients with Heart Disease

T3 Questions Answered by Dr. John C. Lowe
Question 5: Heart Pounding

Low Thyroid Hormone Increases Risk of Death from Heart Attack by 70%

Low T3 Syndrome: A Strong Predictor of Low Cardiac Output and Death in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Acute Effects of T3 Replacement Therapy in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Low-T3 Syndrome

Safety and Hemodynamic Effects of Intravenous T3 in Advanced Congestive Heart Failure

Low T3: A Strong Predictor of Outcome in Acute Stroke Patients
 

nothuman

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Just saw your PM that said your FT3 is sometimes up to 3.5. Well that is definitely better, but I'd still investigate everything I said because you may find something is off. You still do not want low iron. A saturation % of 20 is not good. People focus too much on high iron here when low iron is arguably worse. It's possible you won't need thyroid meds if you get the iron up but the only way to know is to get it up and test everything.
 

Pumped340

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Hey I will answer you on the thread instead if you don't mind

You should look at a site like rt3-adrenals.org (my personal favorite) as it is very comprehensive as far as thyroid health goes and what else it affects. I went for years with a FT3 of around 2.9 as well and thought nothing of it because it's in the normal range. Turned out it was lower than when I was younger because I had lower iron than previously, thanks to blood donations and a major surgery.

Then I saw my Reverse T3 was in the 20s and read FT3 isn't optimal until it's in the high 3s. Having low iron will make thyroid medication not work as well though, so if you take T4, you'll likely only raise your RT3 level instead of your FT3 level, which you do not want. Your FT4 is in a good place in the low 1s, but the purpose of it is to create FT3, which is the gas that makes your thyroid function optimally.

I developed low iron from too many blood donations in order to keep my hematocrit/hemoglobin down. I noticed I had similar thyroid numbers as you for a few years. I didn't have noticeable symptoms for a while but the longer I went like that with lower iron, the lower my cortisol went down (adrenal glands). My worst symptom is severe brain fog, where my head is in some kind of trance all the time and makes it really hard to function. Also fatigue, memory loss, etc.

How are your lipids? I'm guessing they aren't as good as they could be unless you use supplements like krill oil, bergamot, etc. Lower thyroid and iron are likely the root cause.

So going back to myself, I threw every heart health supplement in the fold and still found my heart grow 1mm in a year. I am worried about the diastolic side of my heart (HFwPEF), which is the one there is no treatment for. I don't have it or anything, but if I do not fix my thyroid, it will slowly continue to get worse.

All the research I've done shows that low FT3 is really bad for the heart. I have all the studies that I will post to show you. Meanwhile, most doctors are under the bs impression that it can be the opposite, which is only true if FT3 is too high. I am still in the process of optimizing my thyroid and hope I am able to pull it off and feel like myself again. The good news is a lot of these studies say cardiac issues from low T3 are reversible (up to a point of course).

If I were you, I'd take a high dose of ferrous bisglycinate (most absorbable form of iron that has virtually no side effects) for a month and then get a full iron panel and thyroid panel again (get RT3 too bc it's a very important indicator of how your body converts T4 into T3). Being that you're on TRT, your iron should improve faster than a middle aged woman who is menstruating. At that point, you should add thyroid medication (can't say which one without seeing updated thyroid panel but it could either be T4, T3, or combo). I would also recommend ordering a 4 point cortisol saliva test and do that at home, so you can see if your natural cortisol production at four points of the day is normal or not. If not, you'd have to treat that too.

I am dealing with all this stuff now, and it took me forever to understand and figure out what was wrong with me. I really really think this is your issue as well. It's more common than people think. I am in groups where many others are dealing with the same stuff. Low iron, thyroid, and cortisol go hand in hand with each other. Some might call it "adrenal fatigue" but that is a very misleading term that minimizes what the actual problem is. Other important things that need to not be low are selenium (this is a big one), copper, zinc, d3, and b12. The site I mentioned explains all this.
I appreciate you writing all of that out, but I don't believe it applies to me except for the low iron, likely due to my Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Lipids are great:
Cholesterol, Total: 168 (125-200 mg/dL)
HDL Cholesterol: 61 (> 40 mg/dL)
Cholesterol/HDL: 2.8 (< 5.0)
LDL Cholesterol: 93 (<100 mg/dL)
Triglycerides: 48 (<150 mg/dL)
Non-HDL Cholesterol: 107 (<190)

Selenium mid range:
Selenium RBC: 176 (120-300 mcg/L)

Vitamin D normal (I take 5000iu D3 per day):
Vitamin D, 25-OH, Total: 41 (30-100ng/mL)

B Vitamins normal:
Vitamin B12: 688 (200-1100 pg/mL)
Vitamin B2: 13.1 (6.2-39.0 nmol/L)

Cortisol always ranges from 9 to 19
Cortisol, A.M.: 9.8 (4.0-22.0 mcg/dL)


Even low doses of T4 completely tank my TSH levels. All of my thyroid tests are normal now that I don't take thyroid medication. As expected, T3 and T4 go down a bit while dieting while RT3 goes up, and the reverse happens when I add calories back in.

The studies (I just looked at 4) you presented do discuss issues from low T3, however, none seem to state that T3 levels in the middle of the reference range are actually considered low. Certainly, actually low T3 levels could lead to numerous health issues.

Also, just looking at the titles, I'm sure a lot of these are correlational i.e. stroke patients end up having lower T3 afterwards.

I do believe I should stop holding off on the iron supplementation though given how many tests I've had that show low levels.
 

nothuman

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I appreciate you writing all of that out, but I don't believe it applies to me except for the low iron, likely due to my Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Lipids are great:
Cholesterol, Total: 168 (125-200 mg/dL)
HDL Cholesterol: 61 (> 40 mg/dL)
Cholesterol/HDL: 2.8 (< 5.0)
LDL Cholesterol: 93 (<100 mg/dL)
Triglycerides: 48 (<150 mg/dL)
Non-HDL Cholesterol: 107 (<190)

Selenium mid range:
Selenium RBC: 176 (120-300 mcg/L)

Vitamin D normal (I take 5000iu D3 per day):
Vitamin D, 25-OH, Total: 41 (30-100ng/mL)

B Vitamins normal:
Vitamin B12: 688 (200-1100 pg/mL)
Vitamin B2: 13.1 (6.2-39.0 nmol/L)

Cortisol always ranges from 9 to 19
Cortisol, A.M.: 9.8 (4.0-22.0 mcg/dL)


Even low doses of T4 completely tank my TSH levels. All of my thyroid tests are normal now that I don't take thyroid medication. As expected, T3 and T4 go down a bit while dieting while RT3 goes up, and the reverse happens when I add calories back in.

The studies (I just looked at 4) you presented do discuss issues from low T3, however, none seem to state that T3 levels in the middle of the reference range are actually considered low. Certainly, actually low T3 levels could lead to numerous health issues.

Also, just looking at the titles, I'm sure a lot of these are correlational i.e. stroke patients end up having lower T3 afterwards.

I do believe I should stop holding off on the iron supplementation though given how many tests I've had that show low levels.
Thanks for the latest labs

Important question: What time did you draw those labs when your cortisol measured that low? If it was at 8am, that's a big clue. What you really should do is order a 4 point saliva test online because that will tell you a lot.

You may not agree that your thyroid is an issue, and that's fine. I can't definitely say that you're wrong and those lipids look really good. I just want to plant the seed in your head that you think about this next time you go in for labs and get an RT3 test too to see if you are converting T4 into T3. Low iron makes it very difficult to convert. I would not waste another day without taking ferrous bisglycinate (this form is best and doesn't cause sides, which you'd appreciate having IBS) taken with Vitamin C.

The FT3 normal range is the same as the normal testosterone range. It can be low but still in the normal range. 3.5 isn't terrible, but 2.9 is pretty bad. A lot of your numbers look like a mirror image of mine (maybe slightly better than mine) and others I've seen online who are struggling. I didn't have symptoms at first but then eventually hit me hard as it got worse.

If you have low iron and low morning cortisol, there is a strong chance your thyroid is not optimal. It may not be terrible, but not optimal. Cortisol and RT3 will paint a much larger picture. All those things being optimized will stop stressing the heart, and possibly improve it.

I'd try to get the selenium a little higher, btw, as that is also a major player in thyroid conversion.

At least think about all this, ok?
 

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Thanks for the latest labs

Important question: What time did you draw those labs when your cortisol measured that low? If it was at 8am, that's a big clue. What you really should do is order a 4 point saliva test online because that will tell you a lot.

You may not agree that your thyroid is an issue, and that's fine. I can't definitely say that you're wrong and those lipids look really good. I just want to plant the seed in your head that you think about this next time you go in for labs and get an RT3 test too to see if you are converting T4 into T3. Low iron makes it very difficult to convert. I would not waste another day without taking ferrous bisglycinate (this form is best and doesn't cause sides, which you'd appreciate having IBS) taken with Vitamin C.

The FT3 normal range is the same as the normal testosterone range. It can be low but still in the normal range. 3.5 isn't terrible, but 2.9 is pretty bad. A lot of your numbers look like a mirror image of mine (maybe slightly better than mine) and others I've seen online who are struggling. I didn't have symptoms at first but then eventually hit me hard as it got worse.

If you have low iron and low morning cortisol, there is a strong chance your thyroid is not optimal. It may not be terrible, but not optimal. Cortisol and RT3 will paint a much larger picture. All those things being optimized will stop stressing the heart, and possibly improve it.

I'd try to get the selenium a little higher, btw, as that is also a major player in thyroid conversion.

At least think about all this, ok?
Where do you like to get your ferrous bisglycinate?

You said "that low" about the cortisol, but my levels are very normal. Middle of the range to upper normal (if anything, I've hoped for lower levels). Yes almost all bloodwork I get is around 8am.

Regarding your analogy to testosterone, I'm not actually one who believes someone's testosterone has to be around 1000 to be optimal. I don't believe there's data supporting that. I see guys say they have "low testosterone" at 600ng/dL and I find that ridiculous, that is not low testosterone and the majority of peak natural athletes have very normal testosterone levels. I know less about thyroid now (though at one point I looked into it quite a lot) but again I do believe 2.9 to be very normal. I have taken T4 and T3 before and did not feel any better, TSH was tanked, and I certainly took way too much at times (a regret of mine).

Next time I go I'll get an RT3 thrown in there. I'm cutting now and getting to fairly low calories so I would expect FT3 to be lower and RT3 to be higher again.
 

nothuman

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Where do you like to get your ferrous bisglycinate?

You said "that low" about the cortisol, but my levels are very normal. Middle of the range to upper normal (if anything, I've hoped for lower levels). Yes almost all bloodwork I get is around 8am.

Regarding your analogy to testosterone, I'm not actually one who believes someone's testosterone has to be around 1000 to be optimal. I don't believe there's data supporting that. I see guys say they have "low testosterone" at 600ng/dL and I find that ridiculous, that is not low testosterone and the majority of peak natural athletes have very normal testosterone levels. I know less about thyroid now (though at one point I looked into it quite a lot) but again I do believe 2.9 to be very normal. I have taken T4 and T3 before and did not feel any better, TSH was tanked, and I certainly took way too much at times (a regret of mine).

Next time I go I'll get an RT3 thrown in there. I'm cutting now and getting to fairly low calories so I would expect FT3 to be lower and RT3 to be higher again.
Taking any T4 with how low your iron is would only raise your RT3, probably by a lot. I would have been shocked if you didn't feel terrible doing that. I tried that and it was a disaster.
 

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Taking any T4 with how low your iron is would only raise your RT3, probably by a lot. I would have been shocked if you didn't feel terrible doing that. I tried that and it was a disaster.
Where do you like to get your ferrous bisglycinate?

Doing T4 alone did not make me feel better but also did not make me feel worse. It was crazy, at one point I was an idiot and was taking 400mcg T4 ED and noticed no increase in metabolism (or blood levels of T3). Of course when I took T3 directly I noticed that a lot in terms of increased body temperature and caloric expenditure. I really do question if some of my heart issues came from my short stint of excessive T3 usage :(

I don't know how anyone gets by with just T4. Maybe because when I took it I wasn't legitimately hypothyroid, but even a small amount of T4 completely crashed my TSH and did not raise my T3 at all.
 

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Where do you like to get your ferrous bisglycinate?

Doing T4 alone did not make me feel better but also did not make me feel worse. It was crazy, at one point I was an idiot and was taking 400mcg T4 ED and noticed no increase in metabolism (or blood levels of T3). Of course when I took T3 directly I noticed that a lot in terms of increased body temperature and caloric expenditure. I really do question if some of my heart issues came from my short stint of excessive T3 usage :(

I don't know how anyone gets by with just T4. Maybe because when I took it I wasn't legitimately hypothyroid, but even a small amount of T4 completely crashed my TSH and did not raise my T3 at all.
I use the NOW brand of ferrous bisglycinate and used 4 pills a day for a month. It raised my iron pretty quickly, possibly because I'm a male on RBC increasing TRT if I had to guess.

And I hear you. I did something similarly dumb with taking the T4 only because I wasn't given proper direction. I had 5 different people saying 5 different things without knowing who to listen to. I can't say my symptoms were worse either when I took T4 only but my labs told me I was headed in the wrong direction (I might have overstated before by using the term "disaster.")

It seems like most people feel better on a combo of T4 and T3, rather than T4 alone. The issue with taking T4 is that there are many things in the body that can be going on to prevent it from converting to Free T3, which defeats the purpose of using it. Low levels of iron, selenium, cortisol, b12, iodine, and d3 are a number of things that can prevent both natural and bioidentical T4 from converting properly. It's critical that all of these are normal/high-ish

My issue was high T4 and low T3, which turns out raises my risk of death by 77% or something like that (one of the ways is by attacking the heart). Therefore, T3 only is the way to go in the short term for me because I need to lower my RT3, raise my FT3, and lower my FT4. Once my symptoms subside and I accomplish that, I plan to switch to a combo of 100mcg T4 with 25mcg T3, since I should be able to convert T4 properly again. It was doing damage to my heart despite my healthy lifestyle and multitude of proven heart hearth supplements. Turns out they don't overpower low T3 syndrome, which was 2.9 in my case, and that is very low. At first I didn't notice symptoms, but over time they started and basically confined me to the couch.

In your case, an FT3 of 2.9 will probably be harmful and prevent your heart from improving, while a 3.5 FT3 is better and a little more uncertain. Ideally, a number like 4.0 would be nice. That's the number I'm trying to get to myself. You may not require thyroid medication if you can increase your iron and other potential deficiencies, but you'd need the whole thyroid panel to know that.

Btw, I had no clue about any of this stuff just a few months ago. I had to learn all about this because I couldn't live with the symptoms. One of the things I learned along the way is how important a healthy thyroid is to heart health, and a large part of it is having normal iron levels. Keep me posted.
 

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