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Government tracking emails(USA)

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perfection

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Ok guys I just saw this on the news today and they are tracking every email known to man. Just wondered if this will or is going to have an effect on this board and sponsors here. That means an email sent over seas or a phone call sent over seas they track to see where it is going. Wondering if there is a way to get around this? Anyone else worried about this?
 

rAJJIN

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Are you surprised by it?
I would say the same goes for Text messages, Phone calls or anything else.
Why would it effect the board or the sponsors?
This forum has been here for more then 10 years. BigA and the renegade guys
many years prior to that. It has been through Gear Grinder and also Operation Raw deal. What we advise is for members to make sure they do not break the Law! Anytime you do that there is risk involved for you!
The board and the forum are International and have been set up to abide by the laws. Its why we have to erase so many posts and bann members. Not only for your own safety but also for the Forums safety.

I have noticed that guys will get real tight lipped for a short time after a gear grinder or Raw deal round up... then in 6 months to one year they are wide open with big mouths and detail posting. Pften a slew of new guys not even old enough to know about the previous round ups.

So members should always pay attention. This is an open public forum for anyone in the world to join and be a part of.
As for sponsors often Less is better. we always recommend a thumbs up or down is plenty.
 

rAJJIN

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As for getting around it?
around what? The FBI or DEA technology? Good luck with that one!
Maybe if you are part of the ANON or something LOL
I would advise instead do not give them a reason to want you, or to have to Monitor you.
 

pimpman

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Hellbilly

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As for getting around it?
around what? The FBI or DEA technology? Good luck with that one!
Maybe if you are part of the ANON or something LOL
I would advise instead do not give them a reason to want you, or to have to Monitor you.

lol, right. They just compromised TorMail of all things, so even the dark web has been hit.
 

way2tense

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OP...lol...thanks for the heads up.
I had no idea that the feds were monitoring e-mails.:rolleyes:
first time ive ever used an emoticon.
 

K1

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They have bigger fish to fry

Every time I read a post like this I just laugh at the stupidity...Goes along the same lines of the idiots who say about the govt spy on it's citizens, "If you're not doing anything illegal then you shouldn't care if they are reading your emails or listening to your call."...Just plain ignorance:rolleyes:

You guys better wake up real quick because things are going to be changing pretty soon and if they end up going back to the old days of making orders about 90%+ of you are going to be left out in the cold.....
 

K1

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Lavabit Shutdown Citing Govt Interference

Email service Lavabit abruptly shut down citing government interference | Technology | theguardian.com

Founder of service reportedly used by Edward Snowden said he would not be complicit in 'crimes against the American people'

'The first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this,' Levison wrote.

The email service reportedly used by surveillance whistleblower Edward Snowden abruptly shut down on Thursday after its owner cryptically announced his refusal to become "complicit in crimes against the American people."

Lavabit, an email service that boasted of its security features and claimed 350,000 customers, is no more, apparently after rejecting a court order for cooperation with the US government to participate in surveillance on its customers. It is the first such company known to have shuttered rather than comply with government surveillance.

"I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit," founder Ladar Levison wrote on the company's website, reported by Xeni Jardin the popular news site Boing Boing.

Levison said government-imposed restrictions prevented him from explaining what exactly led to his company's crisis point.

I feel you deserve to know what's going on – the first amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this," Levison wrote. "Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise. As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.

Privacy advocates called the move unprecedented. "I am unaware of any situation in which a service provider chose to shut down rather than comply with a court order they felt violated the Constitution," said Kurt Opsahl, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Several technology companies that participate in the National Security Agency's surveillance dragnets have filed legal requests to lift the secrecy restrictions that prevent them from explaining to their customers precisely what it is that they provide to the powerful intelligence service – either wittingly or due to a court order. Yahoo has sued for the disclosure of some of those court orders.

The presiding judge of the secret court that issues such orders, known as the Fisa court, has indicated to the Justice Department that he expects declassification in the Yahoo case. The department agreed last week to a review that will last into September about the issues surrounding the release of that information.

There are few internet and telecommunications companies known to have refused compliance with the NSA for its bulk surveillance efforts, which the NSA and the Obama administration assert are vital to protect Americans. One of them is Qwest Communications, whose former CEO Joseph Nacchio – convicted of insider trading – alleged that the government rejected it for lucrative contracts after Qwest became a rare holdout for post-9/11 surveillance.

"Without the companies' participation," former NSA codebreaker William Binney recently told the Guardian, "it would reduce the collection capability of the NSA significantly."

Snowden was allegedly a Lavabit customer. A Lavabit email address believed to come from Snowden invited reporters to a press conference at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport in mid-July.

While Levinson did not say much about the shuttering of his company – he notably did not refer to the NSA, for instance – he did say he intended to mount a legal challenge.

"We've already started preparing the paperwork needed to continue to fight for the Constitution in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals," Levinson wrote. "A favorable decision would allow me resurrect Lavabit as an American company."

He continued: "This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would strongly recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States."

Opsahl noted that the fact that Levinson was appealing a case before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals indicated the government had a court order for Lavabit's data.

"It's taking a very bold stand, one that I'm sure will have financial ramifications," Opsahl said.

"There should be more transparency around this. There's probably no harm to the national security of the United States to have it publicly revealed what are the legal issues here," Opsahl continued.

Representatives from the NSA, White House, Justice Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence did not immediately reply to a request for comment
 

K1

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Silent Circle sees 'writing on the wall,'

Shutsdown Secure Email Service

Silent Circle sees 'writing on the wall,' shuts down secure email service | The Verge

Phil Zimmerman’s encrypted communications company Silent Circle is shuttering its Silent Mail email service after another secure email service used by NSA leaker Edward Snowden, called Lavabit, closed down earlier today. Silent Circle wrote that it saw "the writing on the wall" after Lavabit owner Ladar Levison explained he was being forced to "become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away."

Silent Circle’s other services, Silent Phone and Silent Text, are completely end-to-end encrypted; only the users hold the keys needed to decrypt the messages, so even if the company were compelled to produce evidence in court, it wouldn’t have access to its customers’ communications in a usable form. But the protocols used for email — SMTP, POP3, and IMAP — can’t be secured, facing the team with a dilemma: continue providing Silent Mail, which offers similar privacy protections as other secure email services, or ditch the service altogether.

"It's always better to be safe than sorry."

Silent Circle says it hadn't yet received any government requests for data, but didn't want to simply wait until the feds came calling for its customers' emails. "We’d considered phasing the service out, continuing service for existing customers, and a variety of other things up until today. It is always better to be safe than sorry, and with your safety we decided that the worst decision is always no decision," it said.

Update: We've reached out to Silent Circle and received the following statement from Chief Technical Officer Jon Callas:

We give very strong security guarantees about Silent Phone and Silent Text, and every time we talked about key management, metadata, and so on, had to have a little asterisk footnote that essentially said, "Except for Silent Mail." Email is different. It's also useful, which is why we offered as a service.

We have had discussions about it from the very start, and our discussions about whether we should have it at all have been picking up speed. What to do about it was an agenda item on our next BoD meeting, even. We had also planned changes in our offerings to be announced next week.

When we saw the sad news about Lavabit, we had discussions about what that means for us and anyone else running a secure email system. Ladar Levison is a great guy and his team does fantastic work. Something happened there. We can but guess, but there are a lot of obvious guesses.

Our own discussion took on a new urgency. After debate and discussion, we decided that it's best for everyone if we just close it down, delete all the mail, and wipe the disks. It's drastic, but whatever made Lavabit have to close down can't be good for us or our subscribers, whom we have pledged to protect. Of all the choices we had, that seemed the least bad.

For those that do not know:

Philip R. “Phil” Zimmermann, Jr. (born February 12, 1954) is the creator of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), the most widely used email encryption software in the world. He is also known for his work in VoIP encryption protocols, notably ZRTP and Zfone. Zimmermann is currently the President and co-founder of the global encrypted communications firm, Silent Circle.

Zimmermann has received numerous technical and humanitarian awards for his pioneering work in cryptography:

* In 2012, Zimmermann was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame by the Internet Society.
* In 2008, PC World named Zimmermann one of the “Top 50 Tech Visionaries” of the last 50 years.
* In 2006, eWeek ranked PGP 9th in the 25 Most Influential and Innovative Products introduced since the invention of the PC in 1981 .
* In 2003, Reason named him a “Hero of Freedom”
* In 2001, Zimmermann was inducted into the CRN Industry Hall of Fame .
* In 2000, InfoWorld named him one of the “Top 10 Innovators in E-business” .
* In 1999, he received the Louis Brandeis Award from Privacy International.
* In 1998, he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Secure Computing Magazine.
* In 1996, he received the Norbert Wiener Award for Social and Professional Responsibility for promoting the responsible use of technology.
* In 1995, he received the Chrysler Design Award for Innovation, and the Pioneer Award from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.
* In 1995, Newsweek also named Zimmermann one of the “Net 50”, the 50 most influential people on the Internet.
* Simon Singh’s The Code Book devotes an entire chapter to Zimmermann and PGP.
 

K1

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Child porn bust takes half of Tor's hidden sites offline

Child porn bust takes half of Tor's hidden sites offline | The Verge

A man in Ireland believed to be behind Freedom Hosting, the biggest service provider for sites on the encrypted Tor network, is awaiting extradition on child pornography charges, reports The Independent. Denied bail until there is a ruling on the extradition request, Eric Eoin Marques has been described by an FBI special agent as "the largest facilitator of child porn on the planet," and faces up to 30 years in prison if tried in the US.

The Tor (short for "the onion router") network is designed to anonymize traffic, with a layered structure by which users re-route each other's requests through a web of computers multiple times, obfuscating the identity of the sender and receiver. Numerous reports claim that Freedom Hosting users were targeted using a JavaScript exploit of vulnerabilities in the Tor Browser Bundle, a self-contained open source web browser built from Mozilla’s Firefox that makes it easy for ordinary users to access the Tor network. With a user's browser compromised it would be possible to make the affected computer request a webpage outside of the Tor network, reporting its non-Tor IP address in what’s known as a "correlation attack" — in this case, sending requests to a Verizon IP address, according to The Daily Dot. It’s believed that by compromising Freedom Hosting, the attackers have knocked out half of Tor’s hidden services — websites and other services like email (Tormail) that are only accessible over the Tor network.

Freedom Hosting is the largest and best-known hidden service provider, hosting a number of prominent darknet destinations, including well-known child pornography sites as well as Silk Road, an online marketplace for drugs and other illegal merchandise. Its high profile as a safe haven for child porn earned it the ire of internet activist collective Anonymous, which used DDoS attacks to temporarily take it offline in 2011. Marques is scheduled to appear in Ireland’s High Court on Thursday, reports The Independent.

Posted by chicken hawk over on anasci:

The Hidden Wiki discussion page has the most comprehensive explanation of the attack that I've found. The only part I don't agree with, simply because there is no evidence, is the claim that the FH admin was identified through bitcoin cashing out. It is factually incorrect that Onion Bank was started months ago. It was started like 10 days before the bust. However, the FH admin may have been accepting private bitcoin donations, particularly from the CP site operators and users. After all, someone was paying the bills to keep the site running. It's possible that the FBI made a donation and tracked the payment, and if the FH admin didn't take proper precautions in cashing out, he was identified that way. All this will come out in the discovery during his court case.

I do agree that the compromise of Tormail accounts could be very bad for some members of our community, especially if they didn't encrypt their emails and routinely delete read emails from the server.

Here's the Hidden Wiki discussion of the attack.

1. It runs only if Javascript was enabled and affects Firefox 17 on Windows. The exploit used (MFSA 2013-53) and was fixed in Firefox 17.0.7 which is the one used in the latest Tor Browser Bundle, and relies on Windows libraries to execute its payload. If you were using an outdated Tor Browser on Windows and you had Javascript enabled (it is by default) then you have definitely been compromised. If you were using Tor on any other OS, had disabled Javascript, or had the latest version of the Tor Browser Bundle (Torbrowser - Help - About shows the version, which must be 17.0.7 or higher) then you are safe and your public IP has not been transmitted anywhere.

2. The exploit has only been online since after the servers came back on August 3rd, 2013. Now read on for the details...
By default, the Tor Browser comes with NoScript set to "Allow All Javascript Globally", meaning that Javascript is enabled by default. They do this to make it convenient for users which is why it's the default setting even though it's not safe.

3. If you were running an exploitable version of the Tor Browser on Windows and didn't either manually set NoScript to "Forbid Javascript Globally" or disabled Javascript entirely via the Firefox settings, then you are absolutely 100% busted. But if you had disabled Javascript like smart people kept telling you, using either of the two methods mentioned, then the code never executed and you are safe.

4. The FreedomHosting compromise consisted of a small, non-existent image <img> tag injected into all Freedom Hosting sites, and this <img> tag contained an <img onerror=""> event attribute. The fact that the image was missing meant that the "onerror" code ran and retrieved the rest of the code from another Onion site. They did it this way via a small, hidden image to avoid drawing attention to any obvious <script> tags.

5. The main payload (main exploit code) from that onion site then created an iframe and set a cookie in it (the sole purpose of which was to reliably identify your unique browser as you traveled between different compromised FH sites, to build a list of which FH sites you've been visiting) and more importantly ran some 0-day exploits using heap overflows to run any code they desired and escape the Tor sandbox.

6. The 0day exploit code executed some functions that revealed your public internet IP address, MAC address, local hostname (such as "LarrysPC") and what Freedom Hosting site you were browsing (they used a unique UDID for each compromised website) and sent it all to a clear-net IP in Washington. This is no joke. I wish I was kidding. It really did this! They transmit your unique browser ID (cookie value) over the clear internet to their public-internet server, thus giving them a physical person tied to the "random person" they've been observing browsing the different FH sites. With this connection performed, they know your public IP, they have the computer's hostname & MAC address to conclusively identify your computer, they have your unique browser ID cookie, and they have a full list of Freedom Hosting sites that have been viewed by that unique browser. They know exactly how deeply you are involved and their lists allow them to target the people that are clearly intentionally seeking out illegal content.

7. The use of 0day exploits means that the attacker had the huge resources required to find such completely new exploits, and is therefore most likely the government.

8. The fact that FreedomHosting was compromised means that the attacker either physically seized the servers and installed the code (government), or managed to exploit the webserver software (other malicious attacker). Considering recent news reports, it is clear that it was the government.

9. The fact that the clear-net IP collecting all the data is in Washington and that FreedomHosting is now down without a word suggests that the attacker was in fact the FBI.

10. The attacker now has the public IP addresses + what FreedomHosting site you were viewing of everybody that had Javascript enabled on Windows with an outdated Tor Browser Bundle. You better prepare to be raided. Destroy all the evidence now, if your freedom depends on it.

11. The cookie is called "n_serv" and can be viewed under Tor Button - Cookie Protections. By default, Tor is set to erase all non-protected cookies on browser restarts (and to make all cookies non-protected unless explicitly told by the user to protect certain cookies). This means that the "n_serv" cookie will not persist between browser restarts, unless the FBI has made part of their exploit code tell Tor Button to protect the cookie. That is very unlikely, though, as it would be difficult to do so and wouldn't do them much good, since the cookie changing its value doesn't actually harm their operation. They will still get your public IP for every unique browser ID that's being transmitted to them, so it doesn't matter to them if the cookie gets cleared and the browser ID changes. Therefore, due to the fact that the cookie clears itself on restart, the only way to know if you've been affected if you're running a vulnerable browser bundle is if your browser has been running non-stop since before FreedomHosting went down. Meaning that your browser has been running for at least 1 week, preferably 2 or more. If you've got no "n_serv" cookie in a session that has lasted that long then you conclusively know that the exploits have never successfully executed on your machine. The cookie only clears on browser restart. I've always been using NoScript in "Forbid Javascript Globally" mode, my last browser restart was over 2 weeks ago and I am 100% sure I have browsed some FH sites before they went offline and without restarting this browser and I don't have the cookie. People that have either set NoScript to globally forbid, or disabled Javascript entirely in the Firefox settings, are therefore conclusively safe. Everyone else will have been infected and can check for the existence of that cookie to verify that fact (will only be there if their browser hasn't restarted in the past few weeks). Note that the cookie will be created if Javascript is enabled, but the exploit that transmits your public IP to tie that cookie to your identity is a separate action and will only run on exploitable (outdated) Tor Browser Bundles on Windows. Therefore, the existence of the cookie is not enough reason to panic yet. If you're using Windows and you've got a Javascript-enabled Tor Browser that's older than 17.0.7 then your identity has absolutely been compromised.

12. Previous news reports from July 29th, 2013 shows that the FBI performed a nationwide "child sex trafficking" bust, freeing 105 children and arresting 150 pimps/ring leaders (FBI — Operation Cross Country: Recovering Victims of Child Sex Trafficking).

13. Other news from July 29th, 2013 shows that the FBI is trying to extradite "the biggest child-porn facilitator on the planet" from Ireland (FBI bids to extradite 'largest child-porn dealer on planet' - Independent.ie). Seems that the FH admin was a 28 year old that was arrested in Ireland and that the javascript exploits were set up in a joint-operation between the FBI and the Irish law enforcement since all collected IPs were sent to the FBI. If this is the guy, then Freedom Hosting is never coming back, and he's looking at a lot of jailtime.

14. Also consider the fact that the attackers installed code that uniquely identifies each FreedomHosting site you were visiting, since FH served much more than just child porn. The FBI wouldn't want to bust down the doors of people that were looking at relatively harmless stuff from FreedomHosting. They really cared about knowing which specific sites you were viewing and took many steps to ensure that they accurately tracked which sites you visited, through the use of per-site UDIDs and a tracking cookie.

15. Timeline of events: FreedomHosting admin starts accepting BitCoins a few months ago. The FBI traces his BitCoin transactions to withdrawals into a real-world bank account via currency exchange services, thus revealing the identity of the FH admin, and an arrest is made on July 29th, 2013 in Ireland. The servers were then shut down. On August 3rd, 2013 the sites came back online with the exploit code installed.

Note by Mirrorshades: This is speculation -- I don' t think that anyone except those involved really knows how the FH admin was traced.

16. It is pretty conclusive: Get a fucking move on if you were too stupid to disable Javascript, keep Tor Browser Bundle updated, were running Windows, and visited any of the FH sites after they came back online. You do not have much time. Someone in Washington, otherwise known as the FBI, now has your public IP and a list of which FH sites you were browsing. GET A FUCKING MOVE ON! NOW! Destroy everything before you end up behind bars! Remember to run multiple secure wipe-passes of your entire hard drives so that NOTHING can be recovered, and remember that encryption alone is not safe enough, data leaks out of your encrypted containers into the operating system's thumbnail caches. They might not be able to view your actual encrypted TrueCrypt images, but they sure as hell can see what kind of images you had been looking at in the past (Windows has a global thumbnail database containing smaller versions of all Thumbs.db contents from every drive on the system, Mac OS has a QuickLook cache of everything you have ever viewed, and Linux has similar leaks depending on what image viewers you were using). Also remember that they can force you to give up encryption keys (and even sentence you harshly based on suspicion if you refuse to give it out), so it's definitely not safe to keep encrypted TrueCrypt containers. Your freedom should be worth more than that. Take no chances. Perform a full 3-pass random DBAN (Darik's Boot And Nuke | Hard Drive Disk Wipe and Data Clearing) format of ALL hard disks that were used for child porn AND ALL operating system disks related to that! We are on the verge of a global law-enforcement crackdown unlike anything else ever before once the FBI uses the data they have collected, and you may only have a few days until the knock comes. Don't waste time with 35-pass erases, it takes days and they may knock on the door sooner than it can finish and research shows that even a single-pass erase is safe enough, but if you are truly paranoid (even though you would not gain anything from it and would only waste more time) you could do 3 random passes just to be extra safe. Good luck everyone and may God be with you. Time to brace for impact. And remember that silence does not mean that nothing is going on. People that are getting busted won't have any time to connect to Tor and let others know they've been busted. Silence does not mean that busts are not taking place. The FBI is taking this FreedomHosting compromise as the biggest victory in human history. You should treat it with equal respect and do everything in your power to stay safe. This is the calm before the storm. You will see the victims being paraded around in a giant FBI press release within a month or two.

17. For those that had blocked Javascript and are safe: It's now a good idea to remember that Tor should never be trusted, and that any content from Tor sites can be compromised at any time. Always be sure to update your media players such as VLC to the latest versions to protect against exploits in media files. There are no signs that such tampering has taken place, but this is a good time to remind people to be smart. How to be as safe as you can be: 1: Keep Tor Browser Bundle up to date every time you get an update notification. 2: Always disable Javascript. 3: Always keep all your software fully updated. 4: Run everything in a Virtual machine (VirtualBox is free) to avoid data leaking out into your main OS. 5. Use Linux in that VM even if you are primarily a Windows user, because Linux is a fuckton more resilient against attacks. 6: Use encrypted containers inside the VM if your freedom depends on your data being safe from prying eyes. 7: Trust noone. Never reveal personal info on Tormail (now compromised) or even Torchat. You never want to leak anything that leads back to you. Always assume that everyone is out to get you and you will never have the issue of trusting the wrong person.

18. More warnings (TORMAIL): The hidden service for Tormail has been compromised since it ran on FreedomHosting. It's therefore very likely that all the contents of your Tormail inboxes are in their hands. Do not log into your accounts. Depending on how Tormail works, your emails might possibly have been stored in encrypted form in the database and will only be decrypted whenever you log in. In that case, they can only read them by installing a backdoor that makes unencrypted copies as soon as someone logs into their account. Logging in would thereby give them the unencrypted versions. Alternatively, if Tormail already stored everything unencrypted then they already have a complete copy of it and no logging-in-and-deleting will do any good whatsoever. Unfortunately everything points towards Tormail just using a regular IMAP mail server hosted on Freedom Hosting (because of how they allowed regular Roundcube / SquirrelMail access to your mailbox, both of which are just regular unencrypted IMAP web clients), and that would mean that all plaintext emails are already in the FBI's hands and there's nothing you can do about it. Do not log in. Logging in can only make things worse! Tormail is guaranteed to be a major part of this sting because it (along with certain private messaging systems on boards) is the most likely place where people will reveal their true identities to people they've trusted. Tormail has been compromised and all you can do now is NOT log in, and pray that everything was stored as decrypt-on-demand via custom IMAP server software (unfortunately extremely unlikely because no off-the-shelf IMAP servers offer encrypted email storage). That, and destroy all the evidence so that anyone knocking down your door will find nothing on your computers.

More information:

SUMMARY: This is a critical security announcement.

An attack that exploits a Firefox vulnerability in JavaScript [1]
has been observed in the wild. Specifically, Windows users using the
Tor Browser Bundle (which includes Firefox plus privacy patches [2])
appear to have been targeted.

This vulnerability was fixed in Firefox 17.0.7 ESR [3]. The following
versions of the Tor Browser Bundle include this fixed version:
2.3.25-10 (released June 26 2013) [4]
2.4.15-alpha-1 (released June 26 2013) [4]
2.4.15-beta-1 (released July 8 2013) [5]
3.0alpha2 (released June 30 2013) [6]

Tor Browser Bundle users should ensure they're running a recent enough
bundle version, and consider taking further security precautions as
described below.

WHO IS AFFECTED:
In principle, all users of all Tor Browser Bundles earlier than
the above versions are vulnerable. But in practice, it appears that
only Windows users with vulnerable Firefox versions were actually
exploitable by this attack.

(If you're not sure what version you have, click on "Help -> About
Torbrowser" and make sure it says Firefox 17.0.7. Here's a video: [7])

To be clear, while the Firefox vulnerability is cross-platform, the
attack code is Windows-specific. It appears that TBB users on Linux
and OS X, as well as users of LiveCD systems like Tails, were not
exploited by this attack.


**broken link removed**

Mirrorshades

P.S.: I should make it clear that I did not write the above posting, I merely copied and pasted it here for everyone's benefit.

Stay safe, everyone!
 

akmc231

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Hate these threads. The bodybuilding community minds it's own business and doesn't hurt society in any way. I'd bet most people on this site are educated middle to upper-middle class people who go to work and pay their taxes and do absolutely nothing wrong. Who's to tell these people they don't have a right to be muscular? Freedom used to mean something
 

MaineGuy

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Every time I read a post like this I just laugh at the stupidity...Goes along the same lines of the idiots who say about the govt spy on it's citizens, "If you're not doing anything illegal then you shouldn't care if they are reading your emails or listening to your call."...Just plain ignorance:rolleyes:

You guys better wake up real quick because things are going to be changing pretty soon and if they end up going back to the old days of making orders about 90%+ of you are going to be left out in the cold.....

Well, I used to work for the Agency doing this, so I think I would know a little. Sorry. I am not disputing the government is doing this. I think one of the questions was do we have to worry about it doing "what we do". I still stand behind my statement that they have bigger fish to fry. No, I don't agree with what they are doing, but that was not the question.
 
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K1

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Well, I used to work for the Agency doing this, so I think I would know a little. Sorry. I am not disputing the government is doing this. I think one of the questions was do we have to worry about it doing "what we do". I still stand behind my statement that they have bigger fish to fry. No, I don't agree with what they are doing, but that was not the question.

Yeah and I have known many little fish that got popped in a effort to get to the "bigger fish to fry"...So "sorry" the "little" that you know isn't really worth all that much to them, is it?!

Like I said, once things change again most will be back to trying to get their shit through the local gyms and the rest of us will much safer for it.....
 

MaineGuy

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Yeah and I have known many little fish that got popped in a effort to get to the "bigger fish to fry"...So "sorry" the "little" that you know isn't really worth all that much to them, is it?!

Like I said, once things change again most will be back to trying to get their shit through the local gyms and the rest of us will much safer for it.....

I just don't think now that it has gone public that they will use this to get the little fish using AAS. That is just my opinion though. If others were so scared and thought this was going to happen, then I would think they would stop doing business the way they are doing it. Obviously it has been a tactic to get the little fish to get to the larger fish, my point is AAS itself is not as high on the list as terrorism using this type of technology.
 

K1

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I just don't think now that it has gone public that they will use this to get the little fish using AAS. That is just my opinion though. If others were so scared and thought this was going to happen, then I would think they would stop doing business the way they are doing it. Obviously it has been a tactic to get the little fish to get to the larger fish, my point is AAS itself is not as high on the list as terrorism using this type of technology.

This goes far behind mere terrorism...You guys need to stop getting your news from MSN and facebook...If you are right and have worked for these type of agencies before then please explain the SOD cover ups by the DEA...Are you trying to tell us all that the NSA is not passing our emails, phone calls, etc, etc, etc onto other agencies...Doesn't appear you know as much as you would like to believe:

US Directs DEA To Cover Up Program

**broken link removed**

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A secretive U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration unit is funneling information from intelligence intercepts, wiretaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records to authorities across the nation to help them launch criminal investigations of Americans.

Although these cases rarely involve national security issues, documents reviewed by Reuters show that law enforcement agents have been directed to conceal how such investigations truly begin - not only from defense lawyers but also sometimes from prosecutors and judges.

The undated documents show that federal agents are trained to "recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up where the information originated, a practice that some experts say violates a defendant's Constitutional right to a fair trial. If defendants don't know how an investigation began, they cannot know to ask to review potential sources of exculpatory evidence - information that could reveal entrapment, mistakes or biased witnesses.

"I have never heard of anything like this at all," said Nancy Gertner, a Harvard Law School professor who served as a federal judge from 1994 to 2011. Gertner and other legal experts said the program sounds more troubling than recent disclosures that the National Security Agency has been collecting domestic phone records. The NSA effort is geared toward stopping terrorists; the DEA program targets common criminals, primarily drug dealers.

"It is one thing to create special rules for national security," Gertner said. "Ordinary crime is entirely different. It sounds like they are phonying up investigations."

THE SPECIAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

The unit of the DEA that distributes the information is called the Special Operations Division, or SOD. Two dozen partner agencies comprise the unit, including the FBI, CIA, NSA, Internal Revenue Service and the Department of Homeland Security. It was created in 1994 to combat Latin American drug cartels and has grown from several dozen employees to several hundred.

Today, much of the SOD's work is classified, and officials asked that its precise location in Virginia not be revealed. The documents reviewed by Reuters are marked "Law Enforcement Sensitive," a government categorization that is meant to keep them confidential.

"Remember that the utilization of SOD cannot be revealed or discussed in any investigative function," a document presented to agents reads. The document specifically directs agents to omit the SOD's involvement from investigative reports, affidavits, discussions with prosecutors and courtroom testimony. Agents are instructed to then use "normal investigative techniques to recreate the information provided by SOD."

A spokesman with the Department of Justice, which oversees the DEA, declined to comment.

But two senior DEA officials defended the program, and said trying to "recreate" an investigative trail is not only legal but a technique that is used almost daily.

A former federal agent in the northeastern United States who received such tips from SOD described the process. "You'd be told only, ‘Be at a certain truck stop at a certain time and look for a certain vehicle.' And so we'd alert the state police to find an excuse to stop that vehicle, and then have a drug dog search it," the agent said.

"PARALLEL CONSTRUCTION"

After an arrest was made, agents then pretended that their investigation began with the traffic stop, not with the SOD tip, the former agent said. The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as "parallel construction."

The two senior DEA officials, who spoke on behalf of the agency but only on condition of anonymity, said the process is kept secret to protect sources and investigative methods. "Parallel construction is a law enforcement technique we use every day," one official said. "It's decades old, a bedrock concept."

A dozen current or former federal agents interviewed by Reuters confirmed they had used parallel construction during their careers. Most defended the practice; some said they understood why those outside law enforcement might be concerned.

"It's just like laundering money - you work it backwards to make it clean," said Finn Selander, a DEA agent from 1991 to 2008 and now a member of a group called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, which advocates legalizing and regulating narcotics.

Some defense lawyers and former prosecutors said that using "parallel construction" may be legal to establish probable cause for an arrest. But they said employing the practice as a means of disguising how an investigation began may violate pretrial discovery rules by burying evidence that could prove useful to criminal defendants.

A QUESTION OF CONSTITUTIONALITY

"That's outrageous," said Tampa attorney James Felman, a vice chairman of the criminal justice section of the American Bar Association. "It strikes me as indefensible."

Lawrence Lustberg, a New Jersey defense lawyer, said any systematic government effort to conceal the circumstances under which cases begin "would not only be alarming but pretty blatantly unconstitutional."

Lustberg and others said the government's use of the SOD program skirts established court procedures by which judges privately examine sensitive information, such as an informant's identity or classified evidence, to determine whether the information is relevant to the defense.

"You can't game the system," said former federal prosecutor Henry E. Hockeimer Jr. "You can't create this subterfuge. These are drug crimes, not national security cases. If you don't draw the line here, where do you draw it?"

Some lawyers say there can be legitimate reasons for not revealing sources. Robert Spelke, a former prosecutor who spent seven years as a senior DEA lawyer, said some sources are classified. But he also said there are few reasons why unclassified evidence should be concealed at trial.

"It's a balancing act, and they've doing it this way for years," Spelke said. "Do I think it's a good way to do it? No, because now that I'm a defense lawyer, I see how difficult it is to challenge."

CONCEALING A TIP

One current federal prosecutor learned how agents were using SOD tips after a drug agent misled him, the prosecutor told Reuters. In a Florida drug case he was handling, the prosecutor said, a DEA agent told him the investigation of a U.S. citizen began with a tip from an informant. When the prosecutor pressed for more information, he said, a DEA supervisor intervened and revealed that the tip had actually come through the SOD and from an NSA intercept.

"I was pissed," the prosecutor said. "Lying about where the information came from is a bad start if you're trying to comply with the law because it can lead to all kinds of problems with discovery and candor to the court." The prosecutor never filed charges in the case because he lost confidence in the investigation, he said.

A senior DEA official said he was not aware of the case but said the agent should not have misled the prosecutor. How often such misdirection occurs is unknown, even to the government; the DEA official said the agency does not track what happens with tips after the SOD sends them to agents in the field.

The SOD's role providing information to agents isn't itself a secret. It is briefly mentioned by the DEA in budget documents, albeit without any reference to how that information is used or represented when cases go to court.

The DEA has long publicly touted the SOD's role in multi-jurisdictional and international investigations, connecting agents in separate cities who may be unwittingly investigating the same target and making sure undercover agents don't accidentally try to arrest each other.

SOD'S BIG SUCCESSES

The unit also played a major role in a 2008 DEA sting in Thailand against Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout; he was sentenced in 2011 to 25 years in prison on charges of conspiring to sell weapons to the Colombian rebel group FARC. The SOD also recently coordinated Project Synergy, a crackdown against manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers of synthetic designer drugs that spanned 35 states and resulted in 227 arrests.

Since its inception, the SOD's mandate has expanded to include narco-terrorism, organized crime and gangs. A DEA spokesman declined to comment on the unit's annual budget. A recent LinkedIn posting on the personal page of a senior SOD official estimated it to be $125 million.

Today, the SOD offers at least three services to federal, state and local law enforcement agents: coordinating international investigations such as the Bout case; distributing tips from overseas NSA intercepts, informants, foreign law enforcement partners and domestic wiretaps; and circulating tips from a massive database known as DICE.

The DICE database contains about 1 billion records, the senior DEA officials said. The majority of the records consist of phone log and Internet data gathered legally by the DEA through subpoenas, arrests and search warrants nationwide. Records are kept for about a year and then purged, the DEA officials said.

About 10,000 federal, state and local law enforcement agents have access to the DICE database, records show. They can query it to try to link otherwise disparate clues. Recently, one of the DEA officials said, DICE linked a man who tried to smuggle $100,000 over the U.S. southwest border to a major drug case on the East Coast.

"We use it to connect the dots," the official said.

"AN AMAZING TOOL"

Wiretap tips forwarded by the SOD usually come from foreign governments, U.S. intelligence agencies or court-authorized domestic phone recordings. Because warrantless eavesdropping on Americans is illegal, tips from intelligence agencies are generally not forwarded to the SOD until a caller's citizenship can be verified, according to one senior law enforcement official and one former U.S. military intelligence analyst.

"They do a pretty good job of screening, but it can be a struggle to know for sure whether the person on a wiretap is American," the senior law enforcement official said.

Tips from domestic wiretaps typically occur when agents use information gleaned from a court-ordered wiretap in one case to start a second investigation.

As a practical matter, law enforcement agents said they usually don't worry that SOD's involvement will be exposed in court. That's because most drug-trafficking defendants plead guilty before trial and therefore never request to see the evidence against them. If cases did go to trial, current and former agents said, charges were sometimes dropped to avoid the risk of exposing SOD involvement.

Current and former federal agents said SOD tips aren't always helpful - one estimated their accuracy at 60 percent. But current and former agents said tips have enabled them to catch drug smugglers who might have gotten away.

"It was an amazing tool," said one recently retired federal agent. "Our big fear was that it wouldn't stay secret."

DEA officials said that the SOD process has been reviewed internally. They declined to provide Reuters with a copy of their most recent review.
 
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K1

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And here is some more since you are so much in the "know"

DEA reportedly covering up its use of NSA surveillance data to prosecute Americans

DEA reportedly covering up its use of NSA surveillance data to prosecute Americans | The Verge

Lies and blurred lines may be compromising justice at home

Despite assurances from top intelligence officials that the National Security Agency only conducts certain surveillance operations to pursue suspected terrorists, a report from Reuters alleges that a secretive Drug Enforcement Administration unit is using NSA data to launch criminal investigations of US citizens for drug crimes. In a troubling twist, Reuters reports that the DEA is covering up its relationship with the NSA by training federal agents to retroactively recreate the investigative trail in an effort to conceal its NSA leads.

Reuters reports that the effort by the DEA's Special Operations Division (SOD) has resulted in the agency essentially lying to defense lawyers, prosecutors, and even judges about how their investigations began. As The Washington Post notes, the issue is troublesome because of the blurred lines between foreign and domestic investigations, which permit different tactics; the NSA is a military intelligence agency that is supposed to conduct spying on non-US citizens, whereas agencies like the DEA and FBI are tasked with domestic criminal investigations that must respect the constitutional rights of US citizens.

The DEA is essentially lying to defense lawyers, prosecutors, and even judges

The DEA's process for concealing the origin of its leads is called "parallel construction." As Reuters explains, parallel construction may be legal in establishing probable cause for an arrest — but using it to hide how an investigation began could violate the rules of pretrial discovery by keeping useful evidence from defendants. "It's just like laundering money," a former DEA agent told Reuters. "You work it backwards to make it clean."

Neither the DEA nor the Department of Justice returned The Verge's request for comment by the time of publication.

News of the DEA's collusion with the NSA comes as pressure mounts for intelligence agencies and top government officials to reveal more information about the extent of domestic surveillance programs. While President Obama's administration has broadly defended the NSA's activities, Congress is divided on key laws that have enabled the NSA to justify programs like a phone surveillance dragnet that collects records on every call placed within the United States.

Part of the problem is that the public — and even Congress — doesn't know the full extent of the NSA's capabilities, or the legal justifications behind them. And despite several congressional hearings on domestic spying programs, top intelligence officials have obfuscated the full truth, leading some lawmakers to call for the resignation of Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

When asked in June whether the NSA collected "any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of Americans," Clapper replied "not wittingly." A leaked court order revealing that the NSA regularly asks Verizon for all metadata associated with its customers phone calls showed Clapper's statement to be false.

Now, as Reuters has revealed, it appears the worst fears of some civil liberties advocates and government surveillance critics have been realized.

"This is inappropriate, dangerous, and contrary to the rule of law."

"When law enforcement agents and prosecutors conceal the role of intelligence surveillance in criminal investigations, they violate the constitutional rights of the accused and insulate controversial intelligence programs from judicial review," ACLU deputy legal director Jameel Jaffer said today, regarding the DEA's actions. "This is inappropriate, dangerous, and contrary to the rule of law."
 

waynaferd

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Gotdamn, I can't stand it when my father has to show me some lame ass email he got from a friend...can't imagine being the poor suckas looking thru literally billions of emails...unless they look for code words like DVDs to nab the evil doers.

I hope they enjoy the ball and penis pics I send my wife lol
 

Beastinup

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Ok guys I just saw this on the news today and they are tracking every email known to man. Just wondered if this will or is going to have an effect on this board and sponsors here. That means an email sent over seas or a phone call sent over seas they track to see where it is going. Wondering if there is a way to get around this? Anyone else worried about this?

Fkn goverment
 

BigRick82

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Gotdamn, I can't stand it when my father has to show me some lame ass email he got from a friend...can't imagine being the poor suckas looking thru literally billions of emails...unless they look for code words like DVDs to nab the evil doers.

I hope they enjoy the ball and penis pics I send my wife lol

It's not some poor sucker sitting behind a computer looking/scanning emails. It's super computers picking up code words and packing them together. I'm sure once your IP, email, Phone comes through with so many hits on specifics words then you get a person checking in on you.
 
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