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Low dose daily cialis for BP?

Ranchhand

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I passed on Kilimanjaro in 2012 because it was a lot of money for what was basically a high altitude day hike. Yes, the guides do it so much that it's not even close to difficult for them. What I do are usually in winter or alpine ascents. Extremely technical and usually a large degree of planning and calculation is required. I did my first winter ascent on Mt. Washington in the White Mountains in New Hampshire when I was 28. A month later, Mt. Baker in Glacier Peak Wilderness, Northern Cascades with the American Alpine Institute. Man, I was hooked. I'm doing another winter assault on Mt. Rainier in late March. LOL! Joking, you don't assault a mountain, it assaults you. If you don't respect it, it kills you.

That's why cardio is through the roof and trying to suck as much weight as possible right now. I'm using caffeine to burn calories but it's wreaking havoc on my sleep schedule. I bulked up way too much this winter. But I had no idea this spot would have opened up. And I've been with this team before so that puts me at ease. All very competent and fit people. We did an alpine ascent of Mt Shuksan in one day a few years back. The fitness of our lead is in outer space. I think he could run up that mountain. You can see it popping up through the clouds in this photo I took at the Mt. Baker summit below. Consider this another in my series of "Diary Of A Moderator" posts. The photo below that I believe was in South America at sunrise. I'm in the background in the white burgoleen getting my stove ready for breakfast. Dehydrated eggs and rice. Yum. 😜
Mt. Washington in New Hampshire was my first exposure to backcountry skiing. That's where I learned to earn my turns by hiking/climbing and then skiing down, I was hooked too, love super steep and deep back country ski runs, nothing like that feeling and sensation of steep bottomless powder. I've been living in the Rocky mtns for 20 years now because of my intro to Mt. Washington. OuchThatHurts thanks for sharing your high altitude mountaineering experiences, that's a unique share we rarely get on PM here, much appreciated 🤘😎👍
 

OuchThatHurts

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Mt. Washington in New Hampshire was my first exposure to backcountry skiing. That's where I learned to earn my turns by hiking/climbing and then skiing down, I was hooked too, love super steep and deep back country ski runs, nothing like that feeling and sensation of steep bottomless powder. I've been living in the Rocky mtns for 20 years now because of my intro to Mt. Washington. OuchThatHurts thanks for sharing your high altitude mountaineering experiences, that's a unique share we rarely get on PM here, much appreciated 🤘😎👍
I did my share of skiing on Washington and Ranier as well! The powder is righteous, man. And nothing like skiing all day then sitting in an outdoor hot tub while snow is falling on you. Awesome. My family had a timeshare there for many years and I was the only one to fly out there and use it. Otherwise it sat empty for 4 weeks every year. We don't get many rock jocks and ice guys on here. Glad to meet fellow nutcase! LOL! And anytime bro! Rock on! I get pumped just thinking about it. I've climbed rock, ice, mixed, you name it. I took one look at this 200ft spike and I just had to have it. A serac that looked like a mini Matterhorn. Like it was made just for me. The photo beneath I saved bc was a featured article in Rock and Ice on crevasse rescue.

💪😎🤙

3249_1068275704692_8233823_n_1068275704692.jpg

3249_1068275664691_1144977_n_1068275664691.jpg
 

nothuman

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It constricts blood vessels making you colder, burning more energy, but what else is caffeine? Remember, at altitude what does your body do? Makes more RBCs and Hgb right? Of course. So you're blood become thicker to transport more O2 on top of the fact that caffeine iiiiiiisssss..... a natural diuretic! So you add cold temps = higher BP + thick blood + less water.

Uh oh.... You're at 22,000ft, dehydrated with thick blood and it's freezing and your BP is spiking = ☠

And there is nobody going to come for you. You might as well be on the moon. And you're 100 miles from anything resembling civilization.

It's the perfect storm.
This is why electrolytes are so important. Having those in hand in this situation you describe can save a life.
 

OuchThatHurts

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This is why electrolytes are so important. Having those in hand in this situation you describe can save a life.
When I trained in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, we were taught to do many things as guides. Electrolytes are a good one which is why I always put powdered Gatorade into my water once it's been purified to both give me electrolytes as well lowering the water's freezing point.

But in this case, you have 2 options only. 1) Find a way to assist or drag the person to lower altitude or nearest camp and/or 2) create a makeshift camp with a small tent and put the person inside and cover them with unused jackets, coats, put them in a sleeping bag, and some hand warning packets which you break and they become warm, in other words, anything to get the person's body temp up as much as possible while giving them as much fluids as possible. Then it's a race for you (the guide) to get down to a place where you can get a call through to emergency for a helo rescue. Usually this is 10's of thousands of dollars and they won't be skis up until the bastards have been paid.

This is why a guide always has a card with a $100k+ limit (my visa is 120k), a bivy tent, extra water, and a sleeping bag(s), antibiotics, painkillers, and a hundred other things. These can be divided up among team members to share weight. Unfortunately, alpine style ascents are as light as possible, carrying only that which you need to get up the next leg as fast and light as possible. This is why planning has to be perfect bc one error can kill you or the whole darn team. But once you get above 10,000 ft options become more limited bc many helos and even small aircraft do not have pressurized cabins and the engines need oxygen also so going too high could stall you out or the pilot could get sick from the high altitude without being acclimated.

Anyway, there's a lot more to expand on here but the reason people die on mountains is usually logistical and not so much health or injury. Logistics and poor planning. Everything must be planned down to the smallest detail or you're just asking for problems.

So when that altimeter reads 15, 20+ thousand feet, you know that you are totally on your own. Every step higher you take is one step further into danger and you must be willing to put aside your ego or desire to summit and turn around at even a hint of possible trouble. When people stray from the plan and venture past the point of no return (PNR), that's when people die.

Summiting a high peak is the best feeling in life besides when my kids were born but it's extremely technical. Months of planning and training go into just days or maybe weeks from the summit.

Every mental, intellectual, physical, training, experience will be tested fully. Even being at altitude, weird thing creep into your head. You're irritable, hateful, selfish, selfless, brave, and loving, all at the same time. But amazingly, it's all so worth it. It's like nothing else. Nothing compares.

"Every peak, every summit I reach, I'm that much closer to the truth that is my life."
 

Ranchhand

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I did my share of skiing on Washington and Ranier as well! The powder is righteous, man. And nothing like skiing all day then sitting in an outdoor hot tub while snow is falling on you. Awesome. My family had a timeshare there for many years and I was the only one to fly out there and use it. Otherwise it sat empty for 4 weeks every year. We don't get many rock jocks and ice guys on here. Glad to meet fellow nutcase! LOL! And anytime bro! Rock on! I get pumped just thinking about it. I've climbed rock, ice, mixed, you name it. I took one look at this 200ft spike and I just had to have it. A serac that looked like a mini Matterhorn. Like it was made just for me. The photo beneath I saved bc was a featured article in Rock and Ice on crevasse rescue.

💪😎🤙
Must say OuchThatHurts you are the real deal when it comes to being an alpinist. I never took it to the point you have. I did fulltime ski patrol at a ski resort in my 20's and that's when I got into these purist outdoor adventures but never was able to take it to the point you have. Mainly finances stalled me out or I would have taken it farther but did enjoy the experiences I had.

"Every mental, intellectual, physical, training, experience will be tested fully. Even being at altitude, weird thing creep into your head. You're irritable, hateful, selfish, selfless, brave, and loving, all at the same time. But amazingly, it's all so worth it. It's like nothing else. Nothing compares."

I've been there, you find yourself when you have all those emotions running through your head and you have to get a grip to make sure you make it out just fine or even alive. It's a real test of mental fortitude when you're in the hate and you have hours to go before your back at camp, but the feeling you get when back at camp is indescribable ecstasy. Again, thanks for sharing, I'm sure you have more great stories to share.
 

OuchThatHurts

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Must say OuchThatHurts you are the real deal when it comes to being an alpinist. I never took it to the point you have. I did fulltime ski patrol at a ski resort in my 20's and that's when I got into these purist outdoor adventures but never was able to take it to the point you have. Mainly finances stalled me out or I would have taken it farther but did enjoy the experiences I had.

"Every mental, intellectual, physical, training, experience will be tested fully. Even being at altitude, weird thing creep into your head. You're irritable, hateful, selfish, selfless, brave, and loving, all at the same time. But amazingly, it's all so worth it. It's like nothing else. Nothing compares."

I've been there, you find yourself when you have all those emotions running through your head and you have to get a grip to make sure you make it out just fine or even alive. It's a real test of mental fortitude when you're in the hate and you have hours to go before your back at camp, but the feeling you get when back at camp is indescribable ecstasy. Again, thanks for sharing, I'm sure you have more great stories to share.
Thanks. It really is a path of self-discovery. You learn all of the things inside you and some you love and some are just dark. Dark, dark! You need to get hold of all that and double and triple check yourself and your gear constantly. Between REI, a local pharmacy, and my father's nursery and landscaping business, you could say I had sponsorship.

So the gear and travel was taken care of by half but I still made mistakes. Like I almost got myself killed in the Pemi (Pemigewasset Wilderness) by wearing a cotton t-shirt and jockeys. How that works is you if neglect to wear synthetic fiber underclothes which wick moisture away from your skin into the mid-layer fleece, cotton holds water. Absorbs it like a sponge. Now youre a 20 mile hike into the -50° to -70° wilderness and your t'shirt and jockeys are soaked from sweat and now frozen. Which pretty much means that 70% of your body area is against ice. Hypothermia sets in, boom. Yer dead. When it's sunny and warm, cotton keeps you cool for this reason.

Can you imagine dying simply because you chose cotton underwear? Craziest shit. SMH

😂
 

jaxino

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has anyone tracked how much of a drop they get in readings from 5mg daily of Cialis? is it comparable to carditone or low dose telimistraton.

cialis was initally created for BP or maybe viagra but then remarkted for ED.
ARBs are more effective. Telmisartan already at 40mg ed works great.
Cialis at 5mg is a tad low, i would go for 10mg, but you will never see a drop similar to 40mg Telmisartan.
Can't say anything about Carditone, since it's not sold where i live.
 

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