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Why does sudden abstinence fatal?

Alliance Raws-Zoe

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Jul 16, 2018
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Alcohol damages the brain, heart, liver and pancreas, and increases the risk of some cancers,
such as oral cancer and bowel cancer.
It also weaken the immune system, making people more susceptible to diseases like pneumonia and tuberculosis.
Alcohol can be deadly if consumed in excess.

37811356_182529272648560_6815584620206096384_n.jpg


Given these serious health consequences, it is not surprising that many people who are addicted to alcohol try to quit.
However, if the method is not correct, abstinence from alcohol may also have serious health consequences, including death.
Our bodies adapt to some long-term changes in order to survive.
One example is angina, the narrowing of blood vessels that carry blood to the heart .
There is evidence that people with this condition improve slowly and can adapt to reduced blood flow by adding new blood vessels.

37875429_182529245981896_3913359907016933376_n.jpg


Similarly, long-term alcoholics can experience some physiological changes.
Alcohol inhibits the production of certain types of neurotransmitters which transmits information between nerve cells.
After a while, the body adapts to sustained high levels of alcohol by producing more of these neurotransmitters
and their receptors (proteins that bind neurotransmitters to the surface of nerve cells).

When someone who has already developed an alcohol dependence suddenly stops drinking, the neurotransmitter surges far beyond what the body needs.
This surge in neurotransmitters explains many of the symptoms of sudden abstinence, including sweating, tachycardia, restlessness and anxiety.

The neural pathways of excitement and inhibition in the brain control the central nervous system and heart.
When alcohol is withdrawn, high levels of neurotransmitters can overstimulate organs, including the heart.

The situation tends to get worse as the structure of the heart changes with long-term alcohol consumption.
Muscle strength and thickness were significantly reduced in people who consumed more than 90 grams of alcohol per day for more than five years.

Sudden withdrawal of alcohol can also lead to kidney failure. Alcohol must be broken down and removed from the body as urine.
This requires water because the decomposition product must be in a solution state.

Alcohol suppresses the production of an anti-diuretic hormone, so too much alcohol can make you pee more and dehydrate.
Electrolytes in the body, such as sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium, are usually aqueous,
and excessive alcohol can lead to electrolyte imbalances and acid and alkali imbalances. These imbalances will eventually lead to severe kidney failure.

37791960_182529212648566_6492049496917147648_n.jpg


The risk of death from sudden abstaining is very real and very high, and is estimated to be between 6 and 25 percent, depending on the symptoms.
Sadly, the unpleasant experience of abstaining from alcohol, both physically and mentally ,has led many to fall back into heavy drinking.

If you are drinking, it is recommended that you stick to the government's guidelines and consume no more than 14 units per week,
which is equivalent to about six pints of beer or six glasses of wine (175ml).
 

dale338

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Jun 15, 2016
Messages
772
Alcohol damages the brain, heart, liver and pancreas, and increases the risk of some cancers,
such as oral cancer and bowel cancer.
It also weaken the immune system, making people more susceptible to diseases like pneumonia and tuberculosis.
Alcohol can be deadly if consumed in excess.

37811356_182529272648560_6815584620206096384_n.jpg


Given these serious health consequences, it is not surprising that many people who are addicted to alcohol try to quit.
However, if the method is not correct, abstinence from alcohol may also have serious health consequences, including death.
Our bodies adapt to some long-term changes in order to survive.
One example is angina, the narrowing of blood vessels that carry blood to the heart .
There is evidence that people with this condition improve slowly and can adapt to reduced blood flow by adding new blood vessels.

37875429_182529245981896_3913359907016933376_n.jpg


Similarly, long-term alcoholics can experience some physiological changes.
Alcohol inhibits the production of certain types of neurotransmitters which transmits information between nerve cells.
After a while, the body adapts to sustained high levels of alcohol by producing more of these neurotransmitters
and their receptors (proteins that bind neurotransmitters to the surface of nerve cells).

When someone who has already developed an alcohol dependence suddenly stops drinking, the neurotransmitter surges far beyond what the body needs.
This surge in neurotransmitters explains many of the symptoms of sudden abstinence, including sweating, tachycardia, restlessness and anxiety.

The neural pathways of excitement and inhibition in the brain control the central nervous system and heart.
When alcohol is withdrawn, high levels of neurotransmitters can overstimulate organs, including the heart.

The situation tends to get worse as the structure of the heart changes with long-term alcohol consumption.
Muscle strength and thickness were significantly reduced in people who consumed more than 90 grams of alcohol per day for more than five years.

Sudden withdrawal of alcohol can also lead to kidney failure. Alcohol must be broken down and removed from the body as urine.
This requires water because the decomposition product must be in a solution state.

Alcohol suppresses the production of an anti-diuretic hormone, so too much alcohol can make you pee more and dehydrate.
Electrolytes in the body, such as sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium, are usually aqueous,
and excessive alcohol can lead to electrolyte imbalances and acid and alkali imbalances. These imbalances will eventually lead to severe kidney failure.

37791960_182529212648566_6492049496917147648_n.jpg


The risk of death from sudden abstaining is very real and very high, and is estimated to be between 6 and 25 percent, depending on the symptoms.
Sadly, the unpleasant experience of abstaining from alcohol, both physically and mentally ,has led many to fall back into heavy drinking.

If you are drinking, it is recommended that you stick to the government's guidelines and consume no more than 14 units per week,
which is equivalent to about six pints of beer or six glasses of wine (175ml).

I think most here have a general idea of the affects of alcohol. It is true that someone who drinks excessively for long periods of time, will likely need to tapper down. Cold turkey can be deadly and lead to severe side affects. The problem is, the tapering, usually leads to excessive drinking, hence why someone is a alcoholic in the first place. Been there myself a few years ago when I turned to drinking during a sad depressive state in life. It helped me through the period, but when I decided it was time to quit, it was not an easy venture.

Alcohol is socially acceptable, but it is one of the harshest and potentially "evil" of all drugs out there. Even more so than cocaine in my opinion. Once you get up to where you're drinking 10 plus drinks per day, you have a true battle on your hands to come back down. It will affect every aspect of your life. You'l be depressed, physically you'll feel like death and it takes months to recover.
 
Last edited:

buck

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People that drink excessively wont read this post.
 

Voxide

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Jun 6, 2012
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It could be fatal due to downregulation of GABA receptors, then your glutamate ramps up to compensate. It's more complicated than that, but you can sum it up as a plain mechanical rebound reaction. If you're a heavy enough boozer, you'll seize, if you've really been a hardcore booze-bag for many years, this glutamate spike could make your heart give out.

Used to drink nearly 15 units per day. Was it fun? No.
 

dale338

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Jun 15, 2016
Messages
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It could be fatal due to downregulation of GABA receptors, then your glutamate ramps up to compensate. It's more complicated than that, but you can sum it up as a plain mechanical rebound reaction. If you're a heavy enough boozer, you'll seize, if you've really been a hardcore booze-bag for many years, this glutamate spike could make your heart give out.

Used to drink nearly 15 units per day. Was it fun? No.

Yep, you have to taper down over at least a few weeks. But what happens, is most boozers, get a day in and then go on a binger and they are back where they started. When you start getting the shakes by 2pm, you know you've gone too far. I used to think I had hangovers until one day I realized it was withdrawals. The minute I had a drink, I started feeling good again. Got to the point the only time I felt normal was when buzzed. But in reality I was just a fucked up mess.

I was only drinking maybe 10-12 vodkas per day. I switched to wine and was able to go to 6-7 drinks daily for a week, then 3-4, then 1-2, for the third week and then quit. Even after that, I still felt off for a few months.

Alcohol gives you a high, you feel strong, happy, social on the upswing and that is what gets most people. I was a completely different person buzzed. But it's no way to live life.
 

maldorf

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Yep, you have to taper down over at least a few weeks. But what happens, is most boozers, get a day in and then go on a binger and they are back where they started. When you start getting the shakes by 2pm, you know you've gone too far. I used to think I had hangovers until one day I realized it was withdrawals. The minute I had a drink, I started feeling good again. Got to the point the only time I felt normal was when buzzed. But in reality I was just a fucked up mess.

I was only drinking maybe 10-12 vodkas per day. I switched to wine and was able to go to 6-7 drinks daily for a week, then 3-4, then 1-2, for the third week and then quit. Even after that, I still felt off for a few months.

Alcohol gives you a high, you feel strong, happy, social on the upswing and that is what gets most people. I was a completely different person buzzed. But it's no way to live life.

One thing I used to worry about was when I was using steroids. Steroids put a lot of stress on the liver and I figure drinking would really add to that. I never really drank much at all when I was on steroids because of that, and also the fact that it is a detriment to building muscle. I was really strict.

Now that I am only on TRT I drink one or two bottles of wine each week. Nothing too heavy.
 

SWOLNUTZ

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I think at one point in my life, I drank too consistently for too long. I decided to stop and I noticed by day 4 I felt really off but started feeling better after that. By 10 days out, I noticed I felt a lot happier than I ever had drinking. I slept better and I felt more friendly.

I don't drink now because of that.
 

rgrmedic

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I feel better on a Saturday morning when I don’t drink on Friday night.. I also don’t wake up in jail anymore.. that’s kinda nice
 

KillerStack

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I pretty much haven't drank at all in the past 15 years, except this summer vacation, right now, when I had some beers a couple of times. Anyway, I came across some reddit posts about alcohol "after glow" where posters were claiming they felt great mentally the day after moderate alcohol intake. Some said their social life mental outlook improved dramatically when they had a drink or two nightly - I mean once all the alcohol already left the system the day after. I'm not taking up drinking but has anyone here noticed this so-called after glow effect?
 

dale338

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I pretty much haven't drank at all in the past 15 years, except this summer vacation, right now, when I had some beers a couple of times. Anyway, I came across some reddit posts about alcohol "after glow" where posters were claiming they felt great mentally the day after moderate alcohol intake. Some said their social life mental outlook improved dramatically when they had a drink or two nightly - I mean once all the alcohol already left the system the day after. I'm not taking up drinking but has anyone here noticed this so-called after glow effect?

I think that's a real thing for those really stick to 1-3 drinks nightly. Not like I was 10-12. LOL. Whole different ballgame. Study after study had shown that 1-2 drinks per day is healthy. For me, where I am now and with my past problems with it, I just refrain all together. I feel that 1-2 per night would lead back to where I was and I have no desire to revisit that dark place.
 

pickapeck

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I think maybe because I'm older now but alcohol wrecks my physique. I still have 2-4 drinks every Fri and Sat but I would look and feel a lot better if I cut it out all together but the side effect would probably be killing someone I am forced to work with. But whenever I drop it all together my waist comes own and I harden up some.
 

jcc80

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I pretty much haven't drank at all in the past 15 years, except this summer vacation, right now, when I had some beers a couple of times. Anyway, I came across some reddit posts about alcohol "after glow" where posters were claiming they felt great mentally the day after moderate alcohol intake. Some said their social life mental outlook improved dramatically when they had a drink or two nightly - I mean once all the alcohol already left the system the day after. I'm not taking up drinking but has anyone here noticed this so-called after glow effect?
I believe it's a 'glutamate rebound', on a much smaller scale than the withdrawal symptoms mentioned earlier. Some people respond well to that. I just feel 'off' the day after drinking, even if there's no real hangover. So it's all about the person's unique brain chemistry.

Note: I think my answer is correct, but I definitely could be full of shit too.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

lif22

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I think maybe because I'm older now but alcohol wrecks my physique. I still have 2-4 drinks every Fri and Sat but I would look and feel a lot better if I cut it out all together but the side effect would probably be killing someone I am forced to work with. But whenever I drop it all together my waist comes own and I harden up some.
Ditto for me. I can get away with drinking a couple of drinks on Friday (vodka straight) and look decent on Saturday as I dry out from the dehydration. But if i drink on Saturday as well I swell up and lose all definition. Doesnt come back for 2-3 more days. I stick to drinking 1 day of the week.
 

Thebigone

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I’ve always hated alcohol. Never did much for me but get me nauseous. 15 years ago when I was in my fraternity I had to figure something out and the solution was GHB and Gatorade lol
 

lntense

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I was doing a 5th of vodka a night for quite a while with small breaks 1-2 days in between. Then lowered it to a pint for a few months now I’m at little to none at all. But when I do drink it’s a lot.. Alcohol just is not for me. Although it makes me very happy while I’m doing it. That dopamine surge. I never understood how alcohol made people tired. It wakes me up like coffee lol.
 

juggy38

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We detox alcoholics with Ativan tapers...the GABA system needs time to re-regulate.

Some heavy heavy drinkers would need 1-2mg Ativan every 2 hours the first 36-48h after last drink
 

Thebigone

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We detox alcoholics with Ativan tapers...the GABA system needs time to re-regulate.

Some heavy heavy drinkers would need 1-2mg Ativan every 2 hours the first 36-48h after last drink

Short term is ok but benzodiazepines will further inhibit gaba when they are discontinued. But using them for detox to prevent seizures is necessary with some alcoholics.
 

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