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Vitamin D And Fish Oil Supplements Mostly Disappoint In Long-Awaited Research Results

danieltx

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https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/11/10/666545527/vitamin-d-and-fish-oil-supplements-disappoint-in-long-awaited-study-results

Many people routinely take nutritional supplements such as vitamin D and fish oil in the hopes of staving off major killers like cancer and heart disease.

But the evidence about the possible benefits of the supplements has been mixed.

Now, long-awaited government-funded research has produced some of the clearest evidence yet about the usefulness of taking the supplements. And the results — published in two papers — are mostly disappointing.

"Both trials were negative," says Dr. Lawrence Fine, chief of the clinical application and prevention branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health, which funded the studies.

"Overall, they showed that neither fish oil nor vitamin D actually lowered the incidence of heart disease or cancer," Fine says.

The results were presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago and released online Saturday by The New England Journal of Medicine. One paper focused on vitamin D supplementation, and the other focused on fish oil.

The trials involved nearly 26,000 healthy adults age 50 and older with no history of cancer or heart disease who took part in the VITAL research project. Twenty percent of the participants were African-American.

Some of the participants took either 1 gram of fish oil — which contains omega-3 fatty acids — plus 2,000 international units of vitamin D daily. Others consumed the same dose of vitamin D plus a placebo, while others ingested the same dose of fish oil plus a placebo. The last group took two placebos. After more than five years, researchers were unable to find any overall benefit.

While the overall results were disappointing, there appeared to be a beneficial effect when it came to one aspect of heart disease and fish oil: heart attacks.

A secondary analysis showed taking fish oil lowered the risk of heart attack by about 28 percent, which is a "statistically significant" finding, says Dr. JoAnn Manson, who is chief of the division of preventive medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. She led the research.

Those who appeared to benefit the most were people who didn't ordinarily eat much fish in their day-to-day diet, as well as African-Americans, Manson says.

African-Americans in the study experienced a 77 percent lower risk of heart attack compared with taking a placebo, which is a "dramatic reduction," Manson says. Further research is needed to confirm these findings, she adds, but, "in the meantime, it would be reasonable for African-Americans to talk with their health care providers about whether they may be candidates for taking fish oil supplements."

In an editorial also published in the New England Journal of Medicine, authors Dr. John F. Keaney and Dr. Clifford J. Rosen take issue with some of the analysis in the study and write that the positive findings about heart attacks and African-Americans and individuals who don't eat much fish need to be interpreted with caution.

There were no serious side effects, such as bleeding, high blood calcium levels or gastrointestinal symptoms found with either supplement.

Manson and her colleagues plan to further analyze their data and look for possible links between vitamin D and fish oil and cognitive function, autoimmune disease, respiratory infections and depression. Earlier research suggests the supplements may have some benefit for these conditions.

In the meantime, NIH official Lawrence Fine says, don't throw out your fish oil and vitamin D.

"At this point, if one is thinking about supplementation, either omega-3s or vitamin D, talking to your physician or health care provider is the next step," Fine says.

Fine and Manson stressed that vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil are important nutrients, but that the best way to get them is as part of a well-balanced diet. That includes eating fatty fish like sardines, tuna and salmon, and vitamin D-fortified cereals, milk and orange juice.

Another study presented at the same meeting examined whether a substance derived from a component of fish oil, known as icosapent ethyl, might reduce adverse events among people who already have cardiovascular risk factors, such as hardening of the arteries, diabetes or high blood fats known as triglycerides.

Overall, that study found there was a 25 percent risk reduction for patients taking the extract. These patients were less likely to die from heart disease, have a heart attack or stroke, be hospitalized for chest pain or need procedures such as angioplasty, stenting or bypass surgery, researchers reported.

"We are reporting a remarkable degree of risk reduction," says Dr. Deepak Bhatt, who headed the study and is a cardiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

The study, which was also a randomized clinical trial, tracked participants for an average of five years. The volunteers took icosapent ethyl, which is sold under the brand name Vascepa and was developed by the Amarin Corporation, which funded Bhatt's research.

The product is available by prescription only for patients with high triglycerides. But the company is expected to apply for FDA approval within the next year to expand treatment to include all high-risk cardiovascular patients.
 

nothuman

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The high dose (prescription) fish oil studies were mainly positive. Always use more than the labels suggest to get the benefits of fish oil. This does make it very expensive though, unfortunately.

As far as Vitamin D supplements go, maybe they aren't as good as we thought, but for $10 a bottle that will last an entire year, I'm going to keep taking it.
 

Voxide

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Vitamin D might increase androgen receptor density doe :(
 

liv2pb

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Reducing heart attack risk by 25% and 77% for african americans sounds pretty amazing to me; considering they were probably using a shit fish oil with 300mg or less of omega.
 
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f450

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Reducing heart attack risk by 25% and 77% for african americans sounds pretty amazing to me; considering they were probably using a shit fish oil with 300mg or less of omega.

Exactly what I was thinking. Imagine a cancer drug with 77% efficacy...
 

danieltx

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Dave Palumbo's response to article:

[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0DmijBgXOg"]BODYBUILDING BENEFITS OF ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS! - YouTube[/ame]
 

Pericles

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another bs article and no real meta analysis

the article had this in it and lost me there
"Fine and Manson stressed that vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil are important nutrients, but that the best way to get them is as part of a well-balanced diet. That includes eating fatty fish like sardines, tuna and salmon, and vitamin D-fortified cereals, milk and orange juice'

because milk has so much vitamin d...
 

nothuman

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For what it's worth, my cardiologist made a list of what he thinks are the most important heart health supplements the other day: fish oil, coq10, curcumin, magnesium, vitamin d3, vitamin k2, and multivitamin
 

liv2pb

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For what it's worth, my cardiologist made a list of what he thinks are the most important heart health supplements the other day: fish oil, coq10, curcumin, magnesium, vitamin d3, vitamin k2, and multivitamin

Solid list imo
 

Beti ona

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The government financed this study, I do not need to know more, probably the correct answer is the opposite of their "objective and disinterested conclusions". :rolleyes:
 

Beti ona

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another bs article and no real meta analysis

the article had this in it and lost me there
"Fine and Manson stressed that vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil are important nutrients, but that the best way to get them is as part of a well-balanced diet. That includes eating fatty fish like sardines, tuna and salmon, and vitamin D-fortified cereals, milk and orange juice'

because milk has so much vitamin d...

Hahaha, lmfao, fucking joke, balanced diet?
 

Tom

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The objective of this study is to steer as many people away from these healthy nutrients as possible!!!!
 

little slice

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Big Pharma......more profit from an unhealthy population.




perhaps... but then why would they pump out generics like lisinopril n stuff like that for dirt cheap?



idk mayne.. just glad my medication is like $2 a month lmao
 

nothuman

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perhaps... but then why would they pump out generics like lisinopril n stuff like that for dirt cheap?



idk mayne.. just glad my medication is like $2 a month lmao

I think people who play the "I have to pick a side" game are misguided. There is certainly use for both OTC and RX products. Even a lot of doctors play this game.
 

musclemoose

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The government financed this study, I do not need to know more, probably the correct answer is the opposite of their "objective and disinterested conclusions". :rolleyes:

Its my belief that a multivitamin can in fact replace eating vegetables. I personally think the government tells us vitamins cant replace a healthy diet because if we were told it could than most people wouldn't spend the extra money on vegetables. they post these studies to confuse people because agriculture is the backbone of this country and we gotta keep the farmers growing those veggies. Common sense tells me that no matter how you digest your nutrients they all enter your body through your mouth whether its whole food or a pill. so i dont think eating more fish vs. taking fish oil as any different. i dont care for fish and will take my pills. same with veggies. no way i can eat enough veggies to get my nutrients. i cant stomach all that broccoli and asparagus. im lucky if i eat one serving a day.
 
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pickapeck

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The government financed this study, I do not need to know more, probably the correct answer is the opposite of their "objective and disinterested conclusions". :rolleyes:

The government funds most scientific research in the US. There is a grant review process that is the model for most other countries. By discounting government funding of research you are discounting pretty much all research including that done on steroids and growth hormone and all the other PEDs we play with. The government does this to spur research in areas that are not at the time direct conduits to profit but are scientifically useful to extend scientific understanding for future bench to bedside discoveries. They also fund instrument development.For instance, there would be no mass spectrometers if not for the National Center for Research Resources. There would also be no DNA sequencing. There would also would have been no human genome project.
 
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Beti ona

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Its my belief that a multivitamin can in fact replace eating vegetables. I personally think the government tells us vitamins cant replace a healthy diet because if we were told it could than most people wouldn't spend the extra money on vegetables. they post these studies to confuse people because agriculture is the backbone of this country and we gotta keep the farmers growing those veggies. Common sense tells me that no matter how you digest your nutrients they all enter your body through your mouth whether its whole food or a pill. so i dont think eating more fish vs. taking fish oil as any different. i dont care for fish and will take my pills. same with veggies. no way i can eat enough veggies to get my nutrients. i cant stomach all that broccoli and asparagus. im lucky if i eat one serving a day.

Personally I think that food should be the basis of a diet, but nobody needs to consume processed cereals and another 90% of "food" that is sold in the grocery store. I am convinced that the nutritional pyramid of the FDA and other "health" associations is based on the economic element of the different industries: food, health, pharma ... and not the health of the population.

The government continually pushes the consumption of vegetal foods because that way they can sell all the soy, rice, corn, sugar ... they produce. They know that few people eat broccoli and fruits, but everyone loves their cereal box for breakfast with oranje juice and special drink diferent to milk.
 

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