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Two Excellent Training Articles

Kaladryn

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On the first one, I have to disagree with the author, he states that the primary pathways for growth are:

Mechanical tension
Metabolic stress
Muscle damage

I completely disagree, muscle growth is a neurological response to overload. Many years ago, it was thought to be things like muscle damage, but no longer. Even the American College of Sports Medicine recently changed their stance on this (about 10 years ago).

After reading the study in the 2nd link, I see how they are linking the neurological overload to the three things listed above, however I also think they are being somewhat misleading about the certainty of their causes and effects.
 
Last edited:

BigJB

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Also, the strongest powerlifters are by far the largest. You take one of those superhumanly strong superheavyweight olympic powerlifters and properly diet the excess bodyfat off of him and see how much muscle he has under there...

same thing for any heavy/superheavy powerlifter...

it's a good article to make you think but I believe he's simply attempting to make training seem more complicated than it is.

lift weight, increase weight and volume/intensity over time with proper exercise variation and u win. Diet discipline and rest all assumed proper.
 

Kaladryn

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Also, the strongest powerlifters are by far the largest. You take one of those superhumanly strong superheavyweight olympic powerlifters and properly diet the excess bodyfat off of him and see how much muscle he has under there...
This is a good point, plus powerlifters tend to have a very large frame, this makes their muscle mass less pronounced.

BTW, I didn't mean to bash that mega study, it is excellent and everyone should read it if they haven't already.
 

Stayinfit

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Great point Kaladryn.

I do remember in a video Dorian Yates did where he was training two guys. He stated something to the affect, keep track of the weight you use in your first exercise and try and get stronger at that...the other exercises you just throw in... can't remember exactly but this article touched on that I think.
 

BigDM

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Really enjoyed reading that article. Thanks Shelby!
 

golden_age_bb

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On the first one, I have to disagree with the author, he states that the primary pathways for growth are:

Mechanical tension
Metabolic stress
Muscle damage

I completely disagree, muscle growth is a neurological response to overload. Many years ago, it was thought to be things like muscle damage, but no longer. Even the American College of Sports Medicine recently changed their stance on this (about 10 years ago).

After reading the study in the 2nd link, I see how they are linking the neurological overload to the three things listed above, however I also think they are being somewhat misleading about the certainty of their causes and effects.
Can you expand on this?
 

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