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Calesthenics program along side bb training

qbkilla

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Wondering if anyone has done any sort of calesthenics training, functional programming, along side a more bodybuilding program?

Ive wanted to increase my pullups for a while now for functional strength and found this routine has good feedback online ..


Basically 5 sets of pullups 6 days per week. My question, do you think this would cut into recovery from a pplppl, or bro split? I'm thinking maybe just drop sets for back day, and use the pullups as my back exercises only. I doubt I would have to adjust volume on other parts but wanted to get some opinions

Anyone ever did a pull-up program or other type of training in addition to your regular split? I know I've seen guys do MMA training along side bodybuilding, I'd assume they had to make some adjustments to volume or frequency, or both.
 

airman

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Maybe depends on how much you weigh (effort) and maybe age. For myself, I think doing 5 sets daily, I'd be toast after a few days, bicep tendinitis for sure. And probably feel worn out overall.

Overall I think any exercise done daily, especially at 5 sets will end up interfering with the rest of your lifting. But I guess, the only way to know for sure, is to try it for a week.
 

benchmstr

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I have 4 doorway pull-up bars throughout my house and barn(pretty much a house).

every time I walk through that doorway I knock out a set and it’s never less than 10.

I also do body weight squats between every set of all exercises I do usually

I used to try and knock out 100 push-ups, 100 sit-ups and 100 leg raises while I cooked and ate breakfast every morning also as part of my cardio.

it’s like anything…your body will adapt..bodybuilders are NOT athletes…they aren’t putting enough stress on their bodies to not recover from a little extra
 

old timer

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For myself, I think doing 5 sets daily, I'd be toast after a few days, bicep tendinitis for sure. And probably feel worn out overall.
^^THIS^^

If you want to get better at pull-ups, I suggest doing the pull-up program AS WRITTEN. If you wanted to keep the pushing and legs portion from losing much ground, I suggest high intensity, low volume, and low frequency for those bodyparts. Maybe quickly work-up to a near 3 rep max on ONE push exercise and ONE leg exercise twice per week (using different exercises each workout) . . . THAT'S IT. Do the program, improve your pull-ups, then get back to your old program with perhaps one set of max pull-ups somewhere in the pull portion of subsequent workouts to keep you good at them.
 

Dugbet

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Do not look for 2 different goals at the same time, for some reason pro athletes dedicate themselves to one thing only, so that do not interfere with the progress and recovery of their main goal.

If you want to improve on pull ups, do as with any other exercise, progressive overload by training to fail it once a week, or introduce it into a power routine with 2 or 3 frecuency instead of deadlift.
 

TheOtherOne55

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I'm probnably in the small percentage here but just take the majority of your vertical pull volume WAY DOWN.
Then keep your daily pullup stuff in. Also, stick exactly to that program. In my 20s i did mostly PLing stuff but I threw in one of those Pullup programs (always one of my worst lifts despite having a good back) and got my pullups into the 10-15 range which was great for me. Those programs you really need to follow tho.

Do not look for 2 different goals at the same time, for some reason pro athletes dedicate themselves to one thing only, so that do not interfere with the progress and recovery of their main goal.

If you want to improve on pull ups, do as with any other exercise, progressive overload by training to fail it once a week, or introduce it into a power routine with 2 or 3 frecuency instead of deadlift.
Pro athletes are a bad example. I think you're trying to get at that lots of traditional athletes like using block periodization, but pro athletes dont do that. Maybe track and field athletes, where you need one level of expertise is a better example. But if you're a pro football player, you are working on athleticism, strength, power, endurance all day everyday and have been your whole life. But if you're a 100m runner, there is no way in hell running 5000m helps you at all. Like you said, if anything, it makes you worse because you are not following that singular goal of specificity.
 

benchmstr

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Do not look for 2 different goals at the same time, for some reason pro athletes dedicate themselves to one thing only, so that do not interfere with the progress and recovery of their main goal.

If you want to improve on pull ups, do as with any other exercise, progressive overload by training to fail it once a week, or introduce it into a power routine with 2 or 3 frecuency instead of deadlift.
Not really a good example…on one hand your right about specificity…but on the other hand this can be disproved with the conjugate method where you are getting better at 3 things at once
 

Dugbet

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Everything must be adjusted, frequency, duration, intensity ... according to rest and nutrition, and also age, genetics and gear.

But if you already have an intense program, whatever it is, and you are progressing slowly towards some goal, adding extra work, whatever it is, is not the best idea.
 

machomadness22

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I could do the most pull-ups when I did them every day but my lifts suffered this was way back when I was training for
Something not bodybuilding related.
 

qbkilla

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Some good feedback, been busy haven't read all posts in detail but thank you.
 

11111

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You should do it QBkilla. I've done this exact program in the past, back when I read it on t-nation. I did it in addition to my normal training. It's great, you'll become a much better chinner, you'll probably add a little size to your lats/upper back, as well as probably your biceps.
 

Gravyv

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It'll be tough to recover from doing a pullup specific program in addition to lifting. I think a better compromise is to just add in the bodyweight specific work after each lifting session (pullups with back, pushups with chest, etc). Its what I did when I was in the military and I needed to maintain at least 20 pullups to max out my pft scores.

If I felt my pullups were suffering, i'll add in a 20-30 rep lat pulldown set followed up by however many sets of bw pullups I need to get to 50 total reps. You could do pullups throughout the rest of the week but I wouldn't do a lot or to failure. After 12-15 pullups conditioning and technique comes into play.
 

benchmstr

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You should do it QBkilla. I've done this exact program in the past, back when I read it on t-nation. I did it in addition to my normal training. It's great, you'll become a much better chinner, you'll probably add a little size to your lats/upper back, as well as probably your biceps.
Agreed..anyone who says otherwise? Refer them to serge nubrete morning sit-up routine
 

lookslikesausage

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I'll second the bicep tendonitis point. In my experience, and I was someone who spent a fair amount of time doing pullups and considered them one of the most important lifts for the upper body (if you can't do at least ten or close to it PERFECT dead hang bodyweight pullups with the chin clearing the bar, something is wrong), once I tried to program them in more than once a week with any sort of intensity whatsoever, tendonitis reared its ugly head rather quickly. For me, it was a very fine line. The tendonitis would creep in very quickly based on my volume. I could do them hard one day in the week and then maybe a second day but only for a few sets and they had to be easy. Also important to note is that I was also doing plenty of other sets of pulls for my upper back so all of your pulling volume must be accounted for to avoid elbow tendonitis. Mine got so bad that at times I could not even grab a glass to drink out of without significant pain. I'd say go for it be mindful and don't try to fight through the tendonitis pain if it becomes apparent.
 

FrancisK

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I do a set pull ups, dips and push-ups at the start and end of every workout. It’s a really good warm up and top off….gets you ready to rock or finishes you off really well.
 

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Obviously your size will have a lot to do with how many pull-ups yo can do. I just don't carry much mass, but I almost always got compliments on my pull-ups when I worked out in a public gym. Here's a workout from a couple of years ago (pre covid)

 

Muay Thai

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I have always done my sureno workouts from when I was locked up, 3 pump burpees with navy seals integrated (113s aka 100 for your crime and trece for the homeys), brown eagles, aztecas, I have videos of rich PT clients doing prison workouts with me the past decade lmfao. Also I have trained muay thai on and off which was a HUGE complement to bodybuilding results with exception to bulk periods , yoga as well. All surenos in california do the same mandatory workouts and variations
 

Muay Thai

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Obviously your size will have a lot to do with how many pull-ups yo can do. I just don't carry much mass, but I almost always got compliments on my pull-ups when I worked out in a public gym. Here's a workout from a couple of years ago (pre covid)

making em look easy bro! smashing em.
 

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