• All new members please introduce your self here and welcome to the board:
    http://www.professionalmuscle.com/forums/showthread.php?t=259
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
M4B Store Banner
worldofroids
Riptropin Store banner
Generation X Bodybuilding Forum
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Buy Needles And Syringes With No Prescription
Mysupps Store Banner
IP Gear Store Banner
Anabolic Hormones Store Banner
Ganabol Store Banner
Spend $100 and get bonus needles free at sterile syringes
Professional Muscle Store open now
advertise1
PHARMAHGH1
Bruce Labs Store banner
gd
Professional Muscle Store open now
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
roids-210x65-48kb-1
granabolic123
napsgear-210x65
advertise1
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
advertise1
PM-Ace-Labs
advertise1
kinglab
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store
over 5000 supplements on sale at professional muscle store

Nick Walker's new Training Style?

thedorkyd1

Member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Sep 5, 2018
Messages
70
Hey guys, if you follow Nick om instagram you probably already know what i mean. If not and want to have a look, pick any training video in the last few months and you'll see what im saying.

Nick seems to have lightened his loads a fair bit in order to focus on slow tempo and contraction of the muscle. With 4ish second negatives he really squeezes out each rep and maximizes TUT with consistant form.

Is this really the most optimal way to go (in regarda to hypertrophy)? For those of us who lift as heavy as possible in the 6-20 range, should we lighten our weights to perform absolute perfect slow reps, or take a more best of both worlds approach where we use good form (not perfect) and maximise intensity
 

luki7788

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
892

The above post will explain everything and over the years of experience, observations and others, I agree with what is written in it 100%

You also forgot that Nick doesn't want to increase muscle mass anymore, because if he does, he will look completely caricatured and he will not have any chance of good places in competitions
 

Freak Monster

Active member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Messages
231
Hey guys, if you follow Nick om instagram you probably already know what i mean. If not and want to have a look, pick any training video in the last few months and you'll see what im saying.

Nick seems to have lightened his loads a fair bit in order to focus on slow tempo and contraction of the muscle. With 4ish second negatives he really squeezes out each rep and maximizes TUT with consistant form.

Is this really the most optimal way to go (in regarda to hypertrophy)? For those of us who lift as heavy as possible in the 6-20 range, should we lighten our weights to perform absolute perfect slow reps, or take a more best of both worlds approach where we use good form (not perfect) and maximise intensity
Nick Walker is now in contest prep and is alredy have enough muscle mass , he can do light workouts sometimes to recover joints but you and me that dont have enough mass we need to push weights every week. The only way to get huge and dense is heavy weights point . You cant follow workouts of the genetic freaks like Phil or dexter that grow doing pussy workouts ( they are genetic freaks )
 

USMuscle9403

Well-known member
Registered
Joined
Dec 24, 2004
Messages
2,793
I'm not sure what makes you think because he switched up his routine that it must be the optimal way to train. Like others say, the guy can't add any more size without doing a goddamn good impression of a Frigidaire, so it really doesn't make sense for him to add any more size.
 

DarrenG29

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
730
Weight moved builds muscle but going past a certain load won’t provide more muscle just injury’s ask any big guy strong how many injuries they got now we all have injuries not from shit form but the stress of the load on the joints year in year out

but I’ve posted my thoughts and example if you can bench 3 plates doing 4-5 incline doesn’t build a bigger pec muscle look at Ian weak pecs but big bench

you then get better with that 3 plate bench and increase work load reps or sets and week in week out it’s enough weight to continue tearing down muscle as the load is heavy enough and getting stronger serves zero benefit as a bodybuilder

just watch Dennis wolf train
 

DarrenG29

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
730
To further that once you’ve built enough strength steroids like tren and many others that push strength it’s now not the preferred way to grow if your a powerlifter strongman sure but a bodybuilder I wouldn’t say it’s the ideal way

again weight heavy enough is needed but all us bodybuilders can bench 3-4 plates so getting stronger than this or deadlifting 8-9 plates really doesn’t provide bigger muscle.
 

USMuscle9403

Well-known member
Registered
Joined
Dec 24, 2004
Messages
2,793
To further that once you’ve built enough strength steroids like tren and many others that push strength it’s now not the preferred way to grow if your a powerlifter strongman sure but a bodybuilder I wouldn’t say it’s the ideal way

again weight heavy enough is needed but all us bodybuilders can bench 3-4 plates so getting stronger than this or deadlifting 8-9 plates really doesn’t provide bigger muscle.

This is interesting and I won't say you're wrong, but my hypothesis is that it has more to do with maturity of knowing how to train. When you're young, or just starting gear, you wanna bang up those big weights and move some iron. Obviously, you get much stronger and much bigger. However, eventually, that training maturity takes over and 315 barbell rows are slow and controlled instead of being groaners and grinders. You used to be able to bang out 315, sure, but now with the way you train, 315 is what you need and your back looks bigger and better simply based on how well they've become in tune with your body. For instance, moved up to 345x8 on them this morning. Felt good, but I couldn't help but think, "that could have felt a lot better, maybe lighter next time and master 335, instead"

For what it's worth, I'm NOT implying bigger weights don't eventually lead to bigger muscles, but the process, as well as the reverse (training with the same weights leading to more muscle), have some interesting avenues that need to be explored. I remember Lee Haney, "stimulate, don't annihilate", and he only used 185lbs on barbell rows for that massive barn door back (I've seen that fucker in person). Is there a genetic component to this, as well?

Just food for thought, I'm not even trying to argue. I enjoy learning from those who know more than me
 

DarrenG29

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Jan 16, 2021
Messages
730
This is interesting and I won't say you're wrong, but my hypothesis is that it has more to do with maturity of knowing how to train. When you're young, or just starting gear, you wanna bang up those big weights and move some iron. Obviously, you get much stronger and much bigger. However, eventually, that training maturity takes over and 315 barbell rows are slow and controlled instead of being groaners and grinders. You used to be able to bang out 315, sure, but now with the way you train, 315 is what you need and your back looks bigger and better simply based on how well they've become in tune with your body. For instance, moved up to 345x8 on them this morning. Felt good, but I couldn't help but think, "that could have felt a lot better, maybe lighter next time and master 335, instead"

For what it's worth, I'm NOT implying bigger weights don't eventually lead to bigger muscles, but the process, as well as the reverse (training with the same weights leading to more muscle), have some interesting avenues that need to be explored. I remember Lee Haney, "stimulate, don't annihilate", and he only used 185lbs on barbell rows for that massive barn door back (I've seen that fucker in person). Is there a genetic component to this, as well?

Just food for thought, I'm not even trying to argue. I enjoy learning from those who know more than me
This also is a great post and absolutely has truth too it that with time years you just tighten that up and it’s more strict controlled like how nick is doing it now I really do like how nick trains I have done this kind of form slow control your weights much less but the feeling is purely on the muscle and no ego is involved we can get injury’s regardless but I think also it’s finding what works for you not everyone can have the same range of motion limb length flexibility etc.

and the lee Haney phrase I also believe in
 

Bandy0974

Member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Oct 18, 2020
Messages
72
A lot of the biggest bodybuilders that you see who train for the pump or with lighter weights most definitely didnt start that way. After they had built a base of strength with heavy weight it allowed them to have much higher ceiling for their potential.
 

Tallandsmal

Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 6, 2017
Messages
139
Who was it that said to look at what a guy did to get huge, not what he's doing while he is huge.
 

TheOtherOne55

Sponsor Rep
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Sponsors
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Messages
3,847
Apologies to the OP, but Nick hasnt really changed a thing.
Go look back to last year....literally Feb or Jan of last year.
Nick has ALWAYS done this slow and controlled thing.
His smith bench video from this past week is identify to any other pressing video he's posted in the past 18 months.
 

jimmy orangaflop

New member
Newbies
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
14
I think the heavy weights can only get you so far. Recruiting various muscles to move a heavy load isn’t really working exactly what you intend to be working. In terms of building an aesthetic physique I think you need strict form first and foremost. Heavy is also subjective, and from my experience the vast majority of people lifting heavy subjectively speaking don’t make any progress with their physique. Just my opinion here
 

Dugbet

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Oct 6, 2020
Messages
1,208
I think the heavy weights can only get you so far. Recruiting various muscles to move a heavy load isn’t really working exactly what you intend to be working. In terms of building an aesthetic physique I think you need strict form first and foremost. Heavy is also subjective, and from my experience the vast majority of people lifting heavy subjectively speaking don’t make any progress with their physique. Just my opinion here

That's total nonsense, aesthetics are determined by your genes, not your training style. You can replicate Zane, Benfatto or Bumstead's training, you won't look like them.
 

Dugbet

Well-known member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Oct 6, 2020
Messages
1,208
I'm not following Nick, it's surprising the amount of threads that have been opened about him in the last 2 months, I don't know what is special about that boy compared to so many others, but ...

But, this discussion on how to train (heavy weight vs high volume, pump and light) goes on every week and seems like it will never end, when it's pretty simple.

If you are young and healthy, you should try to lift heavy loads, high intensity, not too much volume ... so when you build size, you have years or decades of heavy work behind you and you have reached a certain status (national level, pro card, Olympia stage , whichever is for each), then, you can move on to other less aggressive, longevity and maintenance focused training approaches. I guess it's the same with gear.

Yes, you can see freaks like Dillet, Flex, Rhoden, Phil ... who don't seem like they ever trained basic and heavy, but the consensus is that they are rare cases even among the genetic elite of Olympia competitors. If you don't have those genes, and you should know it, it is not a good idea to follow their training methods.

Finally, Nick or any other bodybuilder should have an annual macro cycle where they will go between different training methods, so watching a video and assuming that this style is responsible for their success in physical terms is naive and ignorant at best.
 

tenny

Well-known member
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Messages
7,460
I'm not following Nick, it's surprising the amount of threads that have been opened about him in the last 2 months, I don't know what is special about that boy compared to so many others, but ...

But, this discussion on how to train (heavy weight vs high volume, pump and light) goes on every week and seems like it will never end, when it's pretty simple.

If you are young and healthy, you should try to lift heavy loads, high intensity, not too much volume ... so when you build size, you have years or decades of heavy work behind you and you have reached a certain status (national level, pro card, Olympia stage , whichever is for each), then, you can move on to other less aggressive, longevity and maintenance focused training approaches. I guess it's the same with gear.

Yes, you can see freaks like Dillet, Flex, Rhoden, Phil ... who don't seem like they ever trained basic and heavy, but the consensus is that they are rare cases even among the genetic elite of Olympia competitors. If you don't have those genes, and you should know it, it is not a good idea to follow their training methods.

Finally, Nick or any other bodybuilder should have an annual macro cycle where they will go between different training methods, so watching a video and assuming that this style is responsible for their success in physical terms is naive and ignorant at best.
yup........pretty simple
 

Joshua82

Active member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Nov 5, 2017
Messages
178
Nicks style hadn’t changed much, still low volume, lifting heavy, going to failure, and still with explosive concentrics. He’s just doing the negative a bit slower. Like TheOtherOne mentioned he’s always had good control over the weight. He just seems to be emphasizing the negative a bit more which makes sense for someone at his strength levels.
 

Dens228

Verified Customer / Kilo Klub
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,398
I don't follow anyone on Instagram except family and a few friends, this thread had me curious about Nick's posts.......there's tons of Nick Walkers, can anyone point me to which is his????
 

tenny

Well-known member
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Messages
7,460
I don't follow anyone on Instagram except family and a few friends, this thread had me curious about Nick's posts.......there's tons of Nick Walkers, can anyone point me to which is his????
just pick one......they are all the same



:cool:
 

b-boy

IFBB Pro / Quadruple Featured Member/ Verified Cus
IFBB PROS
Featured Member
Kilo Klub Member
Registered
Verified Customer
Joined
Jun 15, 2003
Messages
8,842
I don't follow anyone on Instagram except family and a few friends, this thread had me curious about Nick's posts.......there's tons of Nick Walkers, can anyone point me to which is his????
 

Freak Monster

Active member
Registered
Newbies
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Messages
231
Why many post´s of NICK? of course were you find a kid with 24 years old so big , with so incredible quality and muscle maturity that looks like a 40+s bodybuilder ? yes is not a pretty physique but the boy dont made himself and we cant change our bone structure . I hare mine to but i cant do nothing to change .
 

Staff online

  • LATS
    Moderator / FOUNDING Member / NPC Judge
  • Bio
    Moderator

Forum statistics

Total page views
512,505,242
Threads
125,874
Messages
2,462,087
Members
156,445
Latest member
BOBICA
Top