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Skip Hill brings up an interesting topic on @ThinkBigBodybuildingMedia. 🧐

It depend on how long it’s been since you did a deload. At my peak, 8 weeks was the longest I could train without needing to take a week off.
I, personally, from a bodybuilding perspective don’t see a need for deloads if programming is done correctly. But even if implementing them for a psychological reason or because of how you set up your programming, every other week seems excessive to say the least.

I’m not a huge fan of Paul Carter or agree with all he says, but I do agree with him here. Many pros definitely are not programming deloads, though some are.

 
I can see how this would be effective. I used to do a lot of jump training to increase my vertical. I found that a week or two off from training provided the best results. I don’t think it was necessarily beneficial in training (it might’ve been) but what I think is that our muscles are not fully recovered for a good week or two even if they feel fine! It’s extremely noticeable when you’re trying to dunk a basketball! No rest and I could barely squeak one over the rim. After a week or two off, I’d be doing windmills and reverses and shit! To perform your best your muscles need to be fully recovered!
It could be the muscles not fully recovering. But I believe it’s mostly our joints followed by our central nervous system that’s struggling to recover. I believe our muscles recover much faster than the joints and cns as we advance into the intermediate and advanced stages of bodybuilding.
 
I can see how this would be effective. I used to do a lot of jump training to increase my vertical. I found that a week or two off from training provided the best results. I don’t think it was necessarily beneficial in training (it might’ve been) but what I think is that our muscles are not fully recovered for a good week or two even if they feel fine! It’s extremely noticeable when you’re trying to dunk a basketball! No rest and I could barely squeak one over the rim. After a week or two off, I’d be doing windmills and reverses and shit! To perform your best your muscles need to be fully recovered!
For performance, sure there are benefits to backing off. For hypertrophy though, I mostly disagree.
 
I, personally, from a bodybuilding perspective don’t see a need for deloads if programming is done correctly. But even if implementing them for a psychological reason or because of how you set up your programming, every other week seems excessive to say the least.

I’m not a huge fan of Paul Carter or agree with all he says, but I do agree with him here. Many pros definitely are not programming deloads, though some are.

I think some people just recover better than others. Even on a low volume program Dorian Yates did a one week deload after 6-8 weeks of training. Then you have guys like Ronnie Coleman who probably didn’t do a deload unless they were injured.
 
For performance, sure there are benefits to backing off. For hypertrophy though, I mostly disagree.
I agree. But backing off can be of great benefit if your body has a lot of wear and tear on it. I think it all depends on where you’re at in life.
 
I think some people just recover better than others. Even on a low volume program Dorian Yates did a one week deload after 6-8 weeks of training. Then you have guys like Ronnie Coleman who probably didn’t do a deload unless they were injured.
In that scenario, why not adjust your training to something sustainable then though?
 
I can see how this would be effective. I used to do a lot of jump training to increase my vertical. I found that a week or two off from training provided the best results. I don’t think it was necessarily beneficial in training (it might’ve been) but what I think is that our muscles are not fully recovered for a good week or two even if they feel fine! It’s extremely noticeable when you’re trying to dunk a basketball! No rest and I could barely squeak one over the rim. After a week or two off, I’d be doing windmills and reverses and shit! To perform your best your muscles need to be fully recovered!
This is peaking performance. Used in most sports in some way.

But to improve(gain muscle for bodybuilders) nobody do this for a long time during the year.
 
I find it strange that you don’t come back stronger after taking a week off. That said, I’ve taken a week off and actually came back weaker. But that’s the exception and not the norm. Most of the time I come back stronger.
@FK86, does not use AAS, he’s a natural weight lifter. So that part of the equation.

Cage
 
I, personally, from a bodybuilding perspective don’t see a need for deloads if programming is done correctly. But even if implementing them for a psychological reason or because of how you set up your programming, every other week seems excessive to say the least.

I’m not a huge fan of Paul Carter or agree with all he says, but I do agree with him here. Many pros definitely are not programming deloads, though some are.

I feel like Paul says some pretty extreme things to be different anywhere from low reps to side delts and seems like he has been proposing very low volume as of late, and says that overhead extension don't target the long head where pretty much everyone else does.

But I do think if someone is training hard deload can only benefit and not hurt. I've found when I feel like I need them it's usually do to under recovering mentally and physically...lack of sleep, work stress. As hard as we try to recover sometimes things happen we can't. Life happens. I usually feel fuller actually on a deload and get my energy back.
 
I am older like Skip, but fuck that one week off shit.

Sure, if you dont love the gym go ahead.

I lift because I love it. It is part of my routine, it is my escape from life. It makes me feel great, mentally and physically.

It is glorious regardless of of the outcome, IE getting stronger and building muscle.
 
This is peaking performance. Used in most sports in some way.

But to improve(gain muscle for bodybuilders) nobody do this for a long time during the year.
I didn’t know what it was called but yeah that makes total sense to me. Bodybuilding is definitely not the same!
 
Training is much more than just "physical" for me, its "mental health". I need to be in the gym.
That much time "away" would mess with my head in a bad way... (I've been like this all during 45 yrs of training).

Smarter to me would be to drop gear down to TRT only (real TRT) and exercise more for health. (At Skip's age)...
It does make sense though (to some).
 
But I do think if someone is training hard deload can only benefit and not hurt. I've found when I feel like I need them it's usually do to under recovering mentally and physically...lack of sleep, work stress. As hard as we try to recover sometimes things happen we can't. Life happens. I usually feel fuller actually on a deload and get my energy back.

this topic is not about the occasional deload or chill week when life is extremly stressful.
This topic is about doing a deload week or off week every other week.
And this, for me atleast, seems not productive at all
 
A week off doesn't necessarily detrain you, in fact, depending on how you train it should make you stronger! Althought I think sometimes muscularly you might be at peak I speculate it's kind of possible to "forget" a movement with too long a rest, a kind of neural detraining so reps or load might be down because of that.

I totally believe in low frequency as well as low volume being enough or sometimes even optimal for hypertrophy, maybe because I was so influenced by Mentzer and Yates starting out. Mentzer, late in his life, wrote about one of the Barbarian brothers doing a set of leg extentions once every 2 weeks and like doubling both load and reps and putting on a lot of muscle in a few weeks. I actually believe it, but only provided you go on a PED program.

Twice I very quickly recovered muscle from illness and those times I only trained once a week simply because I needed to be driven to the gym and needed some assistance. I only trained deadlifts with a couple of sets of something for the rest of my body. Everything came back to previous peak. It's amazing how little exercise I need, I definitely could maintain almost everything training just once a week. Maybe it's "all drugs"!

Paul Cartner, that asshole lol, was mentioned and he's cited a study which proved that twice weekly training for a certain muscle didn't provide any faster gains compared to once. While I think typical exercise studies might be close to worthless for us for a few reasons, it could still be true.
 
I dont see how anyone at an advanced age is "coming back stronger" every week. My peak strength left a long time ago.
I can’t speak for Skip, but I think he might be experiencing the same thing as me. And that is this: after I’ve been training hard for a while, I begin to struggle to maintain my current strength gains. I eventually reach a point to where I start getting weaker due to joint pain and/or nervous system recovery. When I take a week off, I come back stronger than where I left off. That’s not to say I continually come back stronger than when I began the training cycle. But I do continually come back stronger than where I left off.
 
I am older like Skip, but fuck that one week off shit.

Sure, if you dont love the gym go ahead.

I lift because I love it. It is part of my routine, it is my escape from life. It makes me feel great, mentally and physically.

It is glorious regardless of of the outcome, IE getting stronger and building muscle.
The old school bulk up routines of the 80’s were highly composed of training 8 weeks on and then taking one week off before repeating another 8 weeks of intense training. I’ve found this to work best for my body. Taking a week off is hard for me mentally but I always come back refreshed, stronger than where I left off, and the ability to get a better pump—given I stayed on my diet and anabolics. I’m also able to experience more muscle soreness after the lay off.
 

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